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Genetic Disorders

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Tay-Sachs Disease

Foreword: Before beginning to read this review of the case study, please note that current events of today pertain more to preconception screening for genetic anomalies and genetic studies. Today due to preconception genetic screening many parents opt to terminate a fetus with fatal or painful anomalies; therefore a large portion of the research for parents who are expecting a child with Tay Sachs Disease was noted to be during an approximate 30 year span from the mid-1950’s to the early-mid 1980’s, thus older citings will be noted.
“Tay-Sachs parents say that their child dies three times—when the disease is diagnosed, when the child enters the hospital, and the final time.” (Atwater, 1964)
“How do you parent without a net, without a future, knowing that you will lose your child, bit by torturous bit?” (Rapp, 2011)

Will it be a boy or a girl? What color will the eyes, the hair be? Whose smile will the baby have? These are just a few of the many questions that begin when parents find out they have conceived a child, and most of the time the questions only grow as the pregnancy progresses too; what will they want to be when they grow up? Who will they look like? Will they be strong, graceful, independent, or determined? Should we look at preschools and colleges now? It may not seem to occur very often that parents will say to themselves; we never thought about how we might parent a child without a future. Now instead of questions that may focus on the future, the focus is questions for the present and seeking answers; how much time will I have with my child? How do I handle the problems and pain? Why is my child being punished before they are even born? What did I do wrong? Why won’t anyone tell me how to fix this? In some situations, such as the case study for this paper, these questions occur all too often and may have only heartbreaking...

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