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Germany Revision

In: Historical Events

Submitted By Lewisss123321
Words 13280
Pages 54
SECTION 1: THE SUCCESSES AND FAILURES OF THE WEIMAR GOVERNMENT 1918-OCTOBER 1933

|9 November 1918 |Abdication of the Kaiser |
|January 1919 |Spartacist Uprising |
|February 1919 |First Weimar elections |
|28 June 1919 |Treaty of Versailles signed |
|July 1919 |Weimar Constitution announced |
|March 1920 |Kapp Putsch signed |
|January 1923 |Occupation of the Ruhr |
|January-November 1923 |Hyperinflation |
|8-9 November 1923 |Munich Putsch |
|1924 |Dawes Plan |
|1925 |Locarno Treaties |
|1926…...

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