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Gilgamesh and Sumerians

In: English and Literature

Submitted By Afreena07
Words 1132
Pages 5
Sumerians, the earliest assemblers of civilization in Mesopotamia, established their culture and beliefs based on their perspective of life shaped by their environment. Owing to the geographical location and extreme environmental contrasts in nature in Mesopotamia, it is evident that the inhabitants of this region were both in a state of astonishment and angst. Thus, this was reflected in their tales and stories. The Mesopotamians were humbled people who stressed importance in the afterlife, and devotion to their gods. Their culture emerged from the persistent change and methodological affairs they were accustomed to. In the epic of Gilgamesh, the story follows the heroic journey of a man who is “two-thirds divine and one-third human” to his road to attaining wisdom and piety (Gilgamesh, 71). It is characterized by hope and forgiveness rather than the presumed pessimistic attitude of the Mesopotamians.
The story begins with an introduction to Gilgamesh, the main character, who is a ruler over his people and seen as and “unvanquished leader, hero in the front lines, beloved by his soldiers” (Gilgamesh, 71). Although at first his people are unhappy with Gilgamesh as their king, the story follows through with transformation of this character from a despicable, violent ruler to a hopeful, wiser individual. The prevalence of violence in Gilgamesh’s personality is a reflection of the destruction the Mesopotamians encountered in their nature. There are various occurrences in this poem where Gilgamesh allows his anger to result in a destruction of some sort. Nonetheless, he presents an anticipating attitude toward the hereafter rather than a pessimistic one, which is presented at the end of the narration.
Further into the story, Enkidu, a friend of Gilgamesh, accompanies the hero on his journey to killing Humbaba, the great beast from the forest. Enkidu’s introduction in...

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