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Girl, Interrupted

In: English and Literature

Submitted By dietzcar44
Words 682
Pages 3
Caroline Dietz
Girl, Interrupted Susanna Kaysen does not show many signs of madness through out the book until the chapter entitled “Bare Bones.” (Pg. 94-104) The reader is shocked to find, in this chapter, Kaysen attempting to rip through her hand in order to see if it contained any bones. The chapter begins with Torrey leaving the hospital. Later that day, Kaysen randomly begins to examine her hand. She states, “my palm looked like a monkey’s palm” (Pg. 101) then continues to claim her hand may not be human. She then tries to bite into her hand in order to see inside of it. This is the first act of madness that we have seen from Kaysen so far in this book. She takes the reader through every thought she has in this process. First examining her hand, second biting her hand, third scratching at her hand, and finally being subdued. Kaysen is very distraught when looking at her hand. She worries she is not human because she believes she does not possess any bones in her hand. She claimed, “if I spread my fingers apart, my hand looked more human.” (Pg. 102) This is, of course, absurd to me. All people have bones, and Kaysen is obviously a person, but she is so adamant on not having any bones in her hand. Then, in order to prove to herself she is a real human, she decides to rip into her hand. Though it is hard for me to understand this thought process, I do understand the concept of being curious and wondering about aspects of them selves. Whether or not they are normal. This is what Kaysen is portraying. The fear of not being like her friends and being an outcast.
When the nurse finally notices Kaysen’s actions, she hands Kaysen a cup filled with medicine. Thorazine, to be exact. The nurses do not ask any questions, they do not try to help or try to get to the real problem that caused this situation, they just hand Kaysen a cup with medication to calm her...

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