Global Health Issues in Behavioral Finance

In: Business and Management

Submitted By davisj61
Words 1051
Pages 5
Title Page
Introduction
a. Global Health Issues
b. Economic Impact
Behavioral Finance
a. Emotional Biases
i. Risk Aversion
ii. Regret Aversion
Market Implications
a. Every market in today’s economy was impacted either directly or indirectly by the SARS epidemic.
i. Most saw measurable decreases in GDP
b. Global cost of lost economic activity due to SARS was approximately $54 billion
Conclusion
a. Economic damage caused by SARS can be attributed to the behavioral finance emotional biases of loss aversion and regret aversion affecting investors globally.

Global Health Issues, Behavioral Finance and the Markets:
The Role of Behavioral Finance in how Global Health Issues Impact the Economy
Jonathan Davis
David A Kennedy
Lee V Smith
Tayler T Young
Syed Zain T Zaidi
November 10, 2015
University of Houston- Downtown

Global Health Issues, Behavioral Finance and the Markets:
The Role of Behavioral Finance in how Global Health Issues Impact the Economy
With globalization on the rise, infectious diseases that appear in one country have the opportunity to spread rapidly to others. Recent examples include the 2003 outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and the 2014 outbreak of the Ebola virus. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 8,098 individuals became infected worldwide with SARS and 774 of those individuals ultimately died from the illness (CDC, 2005). While Ebola killed 5,160 out of the 14,098 people infected with the virus (Barber, 2014). Collectively, though tragic, the outbreaks did not lead to the global health impact many feared. However, they had a tremendous economic impact.
Though the most immediate economic impact is felt in the disease-inflicted countries, the economic costs from global diseases like SARS go beyond the damages to those countries. The economic shock to one…...

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