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Growing Up in Zambia

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Fo r Te a ch er s

Growing up in Zambia
A Teachers’ Guide to Civic Education

Camfed has created a new and innovative resource pack for the teaching and learning of Civic
Education. It combines three books: this teachers’ guide, a student workbook and a collection of stories and photographs entitled Listen to My Story. We hope that together, they will inspire a high level of creativity in classrooms across Zambia.
Civic Education is a key aspect of the school curriculum and one that prepares pupils for a productive and fulfulling life. The resource pack addresses issues of great concern to children and young people as they grow up in our society. A particular focus is gender and issues of inequality in Zambia. Many of the stories, photographs and activities enable boys and girls to reflect on the influences on their lives that shape their choices.
English skills, literacy, and other elements of the curriculum are also supported and the sessions in the pack are designed to show how life and learning converge to change people’s futures. I hope that the many Zambian teachers and students who use this rich resource will benefit from the stories, and that the interactive and reflective activities will stimulate interest and learning in different local settings.
Every child has the right to education. Yet in Zambia, as in many other countries around the world, millions of children, especially girls, are excluded from school. We often hear the statistics, but it is rare for those excluded children to have opportunities to make their voices heard. The resource pack draws on the stories of young Zambians from around the country who have struggled to claim their right to education. They have chosen to speak out and share their experiences with other young people to inspire them, and encourage those who may identify with them to have courage. The stories illustrate the many challenges young people, and particularly young women, face on their journey through life, but they also confirm that education can be the torch that lights the way forward.
As a former teacher amd headteacher, I understand the joys and challenges of teaching and the enormous responsibilities involved in helping to shape young lives. I wish you every success in your important career.
Barbara Chilangwa
Executive Director, Camfed Zambia and former Permanent Secretary of Education

1

Teacher’s Guide

Foreword

Teacher’s Guide

2

Teacher’s Guide

Guidance Notes
This guide has been written to raise awareness of some of the challenges faced by children, particularly girls, in Zambia and to contribute to the skills young people develop through education and school which equip them to face and tackle these challenges for themselves.
The resource has been designed to support teaching of the national curriculum, and is most relevant to Civic Education and Spiritual and Moral Education. There is emphasis on group work and discussion that will help pupils develop their oral and aural skills, particularly in
English language. Details of how each session meets the requirements of the curriculum are given below.
Units 1 and 2 are designed for grades 8 and 9 and units 3 and 4 for grades 10 – 12. However, as a teacher, you may want to adapt some of the activities for other grades as you feel appropriate. This guide is intended to stimulate and inspire teacher creativity in the classroom. A Human Rights Approach
Many of the activities in this resource deal with human rights. Pupils will certainly learn about
‘rights’. However, what happens in the classroom should also reflect a human rights approach, and the way in which teachers and pupils interact with each other should have, at its heart, respect and trust. Having high expectations of all pupils, listening to their comments and ideas and encouraging them to do their best are excellent ways of demonstrating respect for pupils. Be aware of the diversity of your pupils and their range of abilities. Use a variety of teaching styles to suit the different needs of your pupils. Encourage the pupils to reflect on, and take responsibility for their own leaning and achievements.

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Teacher’s Guide

Active and Cooperative Learning
The sessions and activities adopt an active and cooperative approach to learning which will enable you, the teacher, to bring a new dimension to teaching that will engage pupils and enliven sessions. It will, in particular, promote the values of pupils, leading to their selffulfilment as mature and responsible citizens. The term ‘active learning’ refers to structured exercises and activities that require individuals to interact with others and to reflect on the experience afterwards. Cooperative learning is the way in which pupils can learn with and from each other. It is based on an acknowledgement that we are all social beings and this interaction helps develop social skills and collaboration for life.
To this end, many activities in the book require pupils to work with others in small groups to discuss and problem solve. Talking out loud and listening to what others say is one of the main ways in which people learn. This helps pupils take more ownership of their own learning and enables them to gain confidence by trying their ideas out with their peers in a safe surrounding. This requires, and will help pupils develop, a range of collaborative, cooperative and interactive skills as well as their speaking and listening skills.
The types of activities used in this resource include:
• small group discussion followed by plenary sessions to develop and synthesise arguments
• open ended collaborative enquiries on topical and contentious issues
• role play, simulations and debates that reflect events in society
• quizzes to test pupils level of knowledge
• story writing and drama to help pupils put themselves in the shoes of others.
The book does not avoid ‘difficult’ issues and offers teachers guidance as to how to introduce these issues with sensitivity. The activities also aim to show pupils some potential solutions to

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We believe this resource will help pupils:
• develop confidence to voice their own opinions
• develop skills in recognising the views and experiences of others
• develop skills in critical thinking and in developing arguments
• develop skills of cooperation and conflict resolution
• develop trust in their creative power
• develop skills of democratic participation
• gain experience of taking action for change.
Before undertaking any of the sessions you are strongly advised to read the teachers’ guide all the way through and refer back to it when working through the sessions and activities.
We anticipate that you may wish to adapt the activities to suit your particular circumstances.
More detailed guidance for each individual session is given below.
Curriculum Relevance
In the description of the sessions, we indicate the objectives and the curriculum relevance of each session in the student workbook. Similar information is also provided for the pupils at the beginning of each session. In general the resource will complement the curriculum and the work of teachers in the following ways:
Civic Education
The activities address many aspects of Civic Education but in particular the themes of citizenship, human rights and obligations, gender and development, economic development, conflict and conflict resolution, and awareness of HIV/AIDS.
English
The activities are designed to: develop pupils’ oral and aural skills through discussions and debates; their reading, listening and comprehension skills through reading the stories; their writing skills through developing pieces of work in different genres and for different audiences; and their composition and language skills through communicating their own experiences and ideas.
Spiritual and Moral Education
The following themes are features of the stories and the activities in this resource: growing up, choosing career and talents, freedom, community, authority, leadership, ambition, hope, friendship, love, marriage, suffering and loss.

5

Teacher’s Guide

problems and help them develop the skills to solve problems they may experience or identify themselves. Pupils will be able to engage with the lives of others through stories from young
Zambians which feature throughout the book.

Teacher’s Guide

Cross-cutting Themes
The themes of health, living together, attitudes and values are found throughout the book:
• Health: safe lifestyles – HIV/AIDS, disease prevention, and competencies – social health including family life, attitudes towards disability, and reproductive health.
• Living Together: family life, Zambian culture and traditions, gender roles and equality between men and women, human rights issues and democracy, caring for vulnerable people and citizenship education
• Attitudes: self confidence and independence, responsibility for own learning, tolerance for the views of others, cooperation when working in a group, open-mindedness towards alternative perspectives.
• Skills: ability to follow instructions, decision-making, problem-solving, creative thinking, critical thinking, handling information.
• Values: spirit of inquiry, understanding, healthy living, leadership, caring, sharing, concern for all life, kindness, respect.
Localising the Curriculum
Every Zambian school is at liberty to localise the curriculum according to local circumstances.
We encourage you to involve local community members in some of these sessions to bring personal knowledge and experiences to the issues that are addressed. We suggest that the range of people is as wide as possible, allowing pupils to hear and learn from the diversity of knowledge and experience that exists within their own communities.

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Group Work
The ideal number for a group is between four and eight. This should allow all those in a group to express a range of different views and ideas, without the groups being too big, so that some pupils might not have a chance to contribute, or may feel intimidated. Groups can be self-selecting, random or teacher-selected. There are some advantages in the composition of the groups remaining the same and some for them changing depending on the type of activity. On some occasions single-sex groups are called for and this is made clear in the session notes. Your role will be to create the groups ensuring that they work well together, and that pupils understand what they are being asked to do. Observe how the groups work together. If someone is not participating, encourage them, and consider moving them to a different group.
Individual Work
Pupils will often be expected to work on their own after they have exchanged ideas in group or as a whole class to synthesise and consolidate their own thinking.
Whole Class
Pupils may work as a whole class to brainstorm an issue, and collect and share the opinions they have formed in group work. Whole class work can be very productive when all pupils form a circle.
This gives everyone a chance to see and be seen, and to contribute.
Timing
Each session is designed to last approximately 40 minutes. As the teacher you can decide to spend less or more time on some aspects of an activity, or to spread one session over two lessons if you consider the activity to be particularly relevant to your pupils. The length of the activity will depend on things like how long you allow for discussions and how much extra material you and the pupils bring to the activity.

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Teacher’s Guide

Groupings
As you read through the sessions you will notice that the pupils will be expected to work individually, in groups or as a whole class. This is indicated in the text.

Teacher’s Guide

Assessment and Evaluation
Evaluation is about making judgements about the worth of what you are doing in order to make appropriate changes and improvements. Several people are stakeholders in your class work and may wish to know how pupils are faring – the head teacher, parents and guardians, education authorities, and pupils themselves. There are several reasons to evaluate sessions.
First of all, evaluation will tell you if you have achieved what you set out to do, what element of the work made the difference and how you could change things if necessary for future use.
It is important that you are clear about your objectives – what you want to achieve – in order to evaluate successfully.
You can evaluate in a number of ways:
• use pre and post-activity quizzes to gauge changes in pupils’ knowledge and skills
• ask pupils questions about what they feel they have learnt
• observe what the pupils do to see if they have understood, for example when they are doing a drama
• get an overall impression by asking pupils at the end of the session to give either a thumbs up, a thumbs down or a horizontal thumb for how much they enjoyed the session, whether they felt they learnt anything new, or useful etc
• set tasks for pupils to do at home to reflect what they have learnt in class.
An important aim of this resource is to encourage pupils to take more responsibility for their own learning. To measure success in achieving this aim, there is a reflection activity at the end of each session. Pupils should be encouraged to reflect on the work they have done in the session and focus on what the aims of the session were. You may wish to discuss with pupils their ideas of how they have done and help them focus on the areas where more understanding or effort is required.

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About this Unit
Although this unit is designed for grades 8 and 9, you may consider adapting and using some of the sessions with pupils at higher grades.
The rationale for this unit is the belief that self-esteem and self-confidence are of vital importance in learning and education. It is designed to encourage pupils to understand others, and develop their ability to stand up for themselves and others. Self-esteem has been called ‘the secret heart of learning’. Essential to self esteem is a sense of identity, a sense of belonging, feeling secure and safe, feeling life has meaning and purpose and feeling capable.
Research has shown a strong link between a child’s self-esteem and his or her academic success; children who feel good about themselves learn more easily, retain information longer and have goals and ambitions. If they have a sense of well-being, they are much more likely to be sensitive to others’ needs, and be able to handle the ups and downs of daily life, including prejudice, peer pressure, abuse, addiction, delinquency and violence.
The sessions in this unit therefore focus on the individual, and aim to:
• develop self-esteem
• give a sense of purpose
• develop individuality
• develop understanding of human needs
• empower pupils to take some control of their own lives.
An important part of this personal development includes thinking about themselves as girls and boys and the impact of their gender on their experiences and expectations. This theme is taken up again in Unit 2.
All about Me
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• identify what they are good at
• know what it means to have strong self esteem
• help them develop more self confidence and independence.
Before running this session you will need to:
• be able to arrange an open space so that pupils can move around
• if the equipment is available, set it up so that pupils can watch a short film on video.
This session supports the following curriculum areas:

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Teacher’s Guide

Unit 1: My Life (Grades 8 and 9)

Teacher’s Guide

Civic Education
The session addresses attitudes and values which are relevant to Civic Education such as respect for yourself and others, a spirit of team work and cooperation.
English
Oral and aural language skills.
Spiritual and Moral Education
Growing up, identifying talents, leadership, ambition and optimism.
Cross-cutting Themes
Self confidence and independence, responsibility for own learning, respect for oneself and others. My Dreams and Goals
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• focus on what they want out of life
• recognise that expectations for boys and girls may be different
• identify actions they can take which will help them achieve their goals.
Before running this session you will need to think about how you will arrange the pupils into mixed sex groups.
This session supports the following curriculum areas:
Civic Education
This session addresses attitudes and values which are relevant to Civic Education such as self reliance and respect for work. It touches on gender and development, political developments in Zambia, and some aspects of citizenship.
English
Oral and aural language skills.
Spiritual and Moral Education
Growing up, identifying talents, leadership and ambition.
Cross -cutting Themes
Self confidence and independence, taking responsibility for one’s own learning, respect for oneself and others.

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Teacher’s Guide

Human Needs
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• know that all human beings have needs
• understand that these needs must be met in order for people to achieve their potential.
Before running this session you will need to provide large sheets of paper or alternatively pupils can work in their exercise books.
This session supports the following curriculum areas:
Civic Education
This session introduces the concept of needs which are the basis for human rights and the study of development
English
Oral and aural language skills.
Spiritual and Moral Education
Growing up, ambition and friendship.
Cross -cutting themes
Safe life styles, taking responsibility for one’s own learning, citizenship, human rights, caring for vulnerable people, respect for oneself and others.
Where is Your Power?
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• realise that people can have different kinds of power
• understand that some people have less power over their lives than others
• appreciate that power can be used for good, and for bad.
No specific preparation is necessary for this session. This session supports the following curriculum areas:
Civic Education
This session lays the foundations for work on democracy, human rights and gender and development. English
Oral and aural language skills.

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Teacher’s Guide

Spiritual and Moral Education
Growing up, identifying talents, leadership, ambition, and freedom.
Cross -cutting Themes
Self confidence and independence, responsibility for own learning, respect, cooperatively working in a group.
Obstacles and Cooperation
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• identify the kinds of obstacles that they may face in life
• understand that it is easier to achieve things through cooperation.
This session involves an activity called The Obstacle Game. You may wish to consider running this activity outside. Here are the instructions:
You will need 4 benches similar in size and one long piece of rope. Set up the course as shown in the diagram below. Copy out the instructions for each team.

Hand out the instructions to each team. They should not look at any of the other teams’ instruction or be told that the cards are different. Follow up this activity by asking the following questions:
• Which team finished first? Why?
• Which team finished last? Why?
• Was the race fair?
• How did it feel to be in the team that had the advantage? How did it feel to be in the team that had the disadvantage?

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Team A
In turn:
Jump over the rope
Jump over the bench
Touch the wall
Jump over the bench
Jump over rope
Touch the next person in line

Team C
In turn:
Jump over the rope
Run around the bench twice
Touch the opposite wall
Run around the bence twice
Jump over the rope
Touch the next person in line

Team B
In turn:
Jump over the rop
Run around the bench once
Touch the wall
Run around the bench once
Jump over the rope
Touch the next person in line

Team D
In turn:
Lift up the rope and crawl under it
Run around the bench three times
Touch the wall
Run around the bench three times
Lift up the rope and crawl under it
Touch the next person in line

Ask the pupils to think of real life situations in which people must compete, despite the fact that some have challenges which place them on an unequal footing, and some may not be able to start the challenge at all. Encourage them to think of gender, or physical ability for example. This session supports the following curriculum areas:
Civic Education
This session addresses attitudes and values which are relevant to Civic Education such as a spirit of team work, sharing with others, helpfulness, and cooperation.
English
Oral and aural language skills.
Spiritual and Moral Education
Growing up, choosing a career, identifying talents, ambition, and suffering.
Cross-cutting themes
Self-confidence and independence, taking responsibility for one’s own learning, respectn for others, and human rights.

13

Teacher’s Guide

• What could be done to make this race fair?
• Was there anyone in the class who couldn’t join in at all, perhaps because they find physical activity difficult?

Teacher’s Guide

Unit 2: Citizenship (Grades 8 and 9)
About this Unit
This unit is designed for grades 8 and 9. However, you may consider adapting and using some of the sessions with pupils at higher grades.
The rationale for this unit is the need for young Zambians to learn about citizenship and what it means to make a positive contribution to their communities. Young people should be encouraged to be involved in decision-making, both in schools and in the wider community, and they should be encouraged to think critically about their role in society and their potential as agents of change.
As part of citizenship education, teachers and pupils have an obligation to promote equality, justice, respect for others and democratic participation. These ideals should be integral to and embedded within the curriculum.
In the previous unit the focus was for pupils to reflect on themselves. In this unit the focus moves outwards to look at what being a citizen means in terms of rights and responsibilities and how, although all citizens are equal, girls and women face particular hurdles and barriers to both achieving their rights and participating as citizens. As we grow up, our culture as well as the media, influences us to act like a man or act like a woman, often without us realising it. Some aspects of this kind of socialisation are important but when assumptions are made that all men and women have to conform to their stereotypes, this can lead to discrimination and the denial of human rights. This unit will provide a foundation for work in grade 10 on citizenship. 14

Teacher’s Guide

What is a Good Citizen?
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• understand that they belong to several different communities
• recognise that they have specific responsibilities to those communities • identify and describe the qualities of a ‘good citizen’.
No specific preparation is necessary for this session. This session supports the following curriculum areas:
Civic Education
This session addresses the theme of citizenship, human rights and gender roles.
English
Oral and aural language skills.
Spiritual and Moral Education
Cooperation, freedom, authority and leadership.
Cross-cutting themes
Gender roles, equality, citizenship, cooperatively working in groups, open mindedness towards alternative perspectives.
Citizens’ Rights
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• understand the basis and development of human rights
• understand that they have rights
• identify obstacles to good citizenship
• know about the existence of the Convention on the Rights of the Child
• consider how rights can improve life in the future.
Before running this session you will need to consider how you will arrange the pupils into mixed sex groups for the first part of this session.

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This session supports the following curriculum areas:
Teacher’s Guide

Civic Education
This session addresses the themes of human rights, obligations, gender roles and gender equality. English
Oral and aural language skills.
Spiritual and Moral Education
Making choices, cooperation, trust, freedom, love and suffering.
Cross-Cutting Themes
Safe lifestyles, gender roles, equality, human right, citizenship.
Gender
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• understand what gender means
• appreciate how gender affects expectations and attitudes
• appreciate that girls and boys perform different tasks and do different activities
• know how stereotyping can limit the potential of both girls and boys.
Before running this session you will need to consider how you will arrange the pupils into mixed sex groups for the first part of this session.
This session supports the following curriculum areas: Civic Education
This session specifically addresses themes of gender roles, gender equality and human rights.
English
Oral and aural language skills.
Spiritual and Moral Education
Talents, ambition and freedom.
Cross -cutting Themes
Self confidence and independence, responsibility for own learning, respect and human rights.

16

Teacher’s Guide

Equality
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• understand inequality and how it affects people, particularly women, around the world
• realise how inequality manifests itself in home and family settings.
No specific preparation is necessary for this session. This session supports the following curriculum areas:
Civic Education
This session addresses the themes of gender equity, human rights and development.
English
Oral and aural language skills
Spiritual and Moral Education
Making choices and talents, ambition and leadership.
Cross-cutting Themes
Gender roles and equality, self confidence and independence, respect and human rights

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Teacher’s Guide

Unit 3: Social Challenges (Grades 10 - 12)
About this unit
Although this unit is designed for grades 10 - 12, you may consider adapting and using some of the sessions with pupils at grades 8 and 9.
Zambia is one of many countries in the world that faces particular and significant social challenges. Whilst there have been many pro-poor and pro-women programmes initiated to bring about change, many children, especially girls, still do not enjoy equality of opportunity.
Zambia has also been faced with huge problems because of HIV/AIDS which has reduced the care available for children, the teachers available for children and has diverted precious resources away from education to health care.
This resource is particularly concerned with the challenges faced by girls who lack equality of opportunity due to gender stereotyping and traditional beliefs and practices which deny them the chance to complete their education and fulfill their potential.
Barriers to school
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• appreciate the importance of education
• understand that there is a gap between access to education for girls and boys
• understand some of the barriers that prevent children from going to school.

18

Teacher’s Guide

No specific preparation is necessary for this session. It supports the following curriculum areas: Civic Education
This session addresses the themes of human rights, gender roles and development.
English
Oral and aural language skills.
Spiritual and Moral Education
Making choices, talents, freedom, ambition and hope.
Cross-cutting Themes
Gender roles and equality, human rights, and citizenship.
Should Priscilla go to school?
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• understand how early marriage can deny girls an education
• realise that attitudes to traditional practices can be changed
• appreciate how the support of others can help girls to complete their education
No specific preparation is necessary for this session. This session supports the following curriculum areas:
Civic Education
This session addresses the themes of human rights, gender roles and development.
English
Oral and aural language skills.
Spiritual and Moral Education
Talents, cooperation, trust, freedom, ambition and hope.
Cross-cutting Themes
Gender roles, equality, human rights, citizenship and responsibility for own learning.
Child Labour
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• understand the reasons why children in Zambia often have to work
• understand how this prevents them receiving an adequate education
• know something about the nature of child labour in Zambia.

19

Teacher’s Guide

No specific preparation is necessary for this session. This session supports the following curriculum areas:
Civic Education
This session addresses the themes of human rights and development.
English
Oral and aural language skills.
Spiritual and Moral Education
Freedom, ambition and suffering.
Cross-cutting Themes
Safe lifestyles and disease prevention.
Teenage mothers
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• know that teenage pregnancies are a universal phenomena
• understand the difficulties faced by teenage mothers, particularly with regard to completing education • be equipped with skills that will help them resist negative peer pressure.
No specific preparation is necessary for this session. This session supports the following curriculum areas:
Civic Education
This session addresses the themes of human rights, sex and gender roles and development.
English
Oral and aural language skills.
Spiritual and Moral Education
Growing up, trust, ambition, friendship and love.
Cross-cutting Themes
Safe lifestyles, gender roles and equality, human rights, self confidence and independence.
Divorce
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• understand the differences between traditional and statutory marriage
• how divorce can discriminate against women

20

Teacher’s Guide

• how children, and particularly their education, can suffer from divorce.
No specific preparation is necessary for this session. This session supports the following curriculum areas:
Civic Education
This session addresses the themes of human rights and gender roles.
English
Oral and aural language skills.
Spiritual and Moral Education
Freedom, love and marriage.
Cross-cutting Themes
Gender roles and equality, human rights, citizenship, self confidence and independence.
HIV/AIDS
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• understand the impact of HIV/AIDS particularly on the education and welfare of children
• realise that young women aged 15-19 are 5 times more likely to be affected than their male counterparts in the same age group

21

Teacher’s Guide

• understand the situations that may force young women into situations where they may be at risk of HIV/AIDS.
No specific preparation is necessary for this session. This session is appropriate to the following curriculum areas:
Civic Education
This session addresses the themes of human rights, sex and gender roles.
English
Oral and aural language skills.
Spiritual and Moral Education
Growing up, trust, love and marriage, suffering and death.
Cross-cutting Themes
Safe lifestyles, disease prevention, gender roles and equality, caring for vulnerable people, open mindedness towards alternative perspectives.

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About this unit
Although this unit is designed for grades 10 - 12, you may consider adapting and using some of the sessions with pupils at grades 8 and 9.
The emphasis in this unit is on pupils engaging with issues and being equipped with skills which will enable them to take action, in some form, to address the issues that concern them.
They key to this is in developing positive, can-do attitudes towards the challenges that young people face, and in learning how to become involved in democratic processes as active citizens. This unit will build on what pupils have learnt about the legal and moral aspects citizenship and will provide ideas and ways in which pupils can participate in community activities.
Why Act on Inequality?
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• appreciate the impact some individuals have had on their society
• learn from role models who have made significant change
• feel empowered to take action to improve their own and others’ lives.
No specific preparation is necessary for this session. This session supports the following curriculum areas:
Civic Education
This session addresses the themes of human rights and obligations.
English
Oral and aural language skills.
Spiritual and Moral Education
Cooperation, authority and leadership, ambition and hope.
Cross-cutting Themes
Gender roles and equality, human rights and democracy, self confidence and independence.
Champions
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• identify and assess Zambia’s societal core values
• understand what it means to be an activist

23

Teacher’s Guide

Unit 4: Speaking up and Speaking out (Grades 9 - 12)

Teacher’s Guide

No specific preparation is necessary for this session. This session supports the following curriculum areas:
Civic Education
This session addresses the themes of obligations.
English
Oral and aural language skills.
Spiritual and Moral Education
Cooperation, freedom, authority and leadership, ambition and hope.
Cross-cutting Themes
Human rights and democracy, citizenship, self confidence and independence.
Identifying your issue
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• explore and identify issues that concern them

24

Teacher’s Guide

• understand the importance of being knowledgeable about issues
• know how to research issues.
No specific preparation is necessary for this session. This session supports the following curriculum areas:
Civic Education
This session addresses the themes of human rights and responsibilities.
English
Oral and aural language skills.
Spiritual and Moral Education
Cooperation, freedom, authority and leadership.
Cross-Cutting Themes
Human rights and democracy, citizenship, responsibility for own learning.
Getting Active
The objectives for this session are for pupils to:
• understand what it means to be an active citizen
• appreciate the benefits of democracy
• know how to participate in a democracy
No specific preparation is necessary for this session. This session supports the following curriculum areas:
Civic Education
This session addresses the themes of human rights, responsibilities and development.
English
Oral and aural language skills.
Spiritual and Moral Education
Cooperation, freedom, authority and leadership.
Cross-cutting Themes
Human rights and democracy, citizenship, self confidence, responsibility for own learning, cooperatively working in a group.

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Growing up in Zambia
A Teachers’ Guide to Civic Education

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