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Hamlet Allusions

In: English and Literature

Submitted By jakenevins23
Words 1095
Pages 5
Jake Nevins
3/15/13
English foundations honors 2
Mrs. Muratori

Research paper hamlet
INTRO
Hamlet is a tragedy by William Shakespeare where the main character, Hamlet,
Thesis: In William Shakespeare’s Hamlet mythological and biblical allusions informs us of Hamlet’s inevitable fall.

Throughout the play, Hamlet uses many mythological allusions to show his feelings towards other characters such as Claudius, Gertrude and the old king as well as inform us of his “fall”. After Queen Gertrude is re-married to Claudius, Hamlet shows his feelings when he compares the late King Hamlet to Claudius. Hamlet tells his mother, "So excellent a king, that was to this / Hyperion to a satyr." (Ham. I ii 139-40). This allusion shows Hamlet's high praise for his dead father as well as his extreme hatred for Claudius. Hyperion is the Greek sun god. By comparing his dead father to Hyperion, Hamlet does not just connect his father to a titan, but also the source of light and with that hope and happiness. The sun is what also sustains life. Hamlet is alluding to how his father was a great king, a strong and dynamic leader that cared for his family and strength of Denmark. The sun also symbolizes warmth and glory which are qualities reflected upon his father. A good king, like the sun, is also a keeper of the peace who watches from above. It is evident that Hamlet greatly loved his father and is stunned by how his mother quickly moved on after his death to marry Claudius who Hamlet refers to as a satyr. Hamlet depicts Claudius as a satyr, which in Greek mythology is a half human and half goat creature that indulges in drinking and lust. These allusions prove to us how much Hamlet loves his old father, old king Hamlet, and how much he dislikes Claudius. Hamlet also compares his mother with the Trojan Queen named Hecuba. As the play in Act 2 takes...

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