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Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

STUDENT’S HANDBOOK 2011/2012

Lazarski University Warsaw, June 2011
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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Content Page 4 6 8 13 15 15 15 17 17 18 19 21 23 24 26 28 30 32 34 35 37 39 41 43 44 46 48 49 50 51 53 54 55 57 58 59 60 62 63 63 64 66 67 69 72 74 75 76 77 79 80 82

The Programme The Degree Assessment Quality Assurance Admission Procedures Erasmus Study in BABE Programme Administrative Issues Course Descriptors Mathematics Introductory Microeconomics Introduction to Sociology Current Issues of the European and Global Economy Academic Writing Introduction into Business Introductory Macroeconomics Introduction into Economic Analysis Economics of Integration Information Technology Intermediate Microeconomics Issues in Macroeconomic Policy Mathematical Economics Statistics Regional Economics Introduction to Strategic Management Banking and Finance International Business Law Research Proseminar Accounting Managerial Economics International Economics Intermediate Macroeconomics Econometrics Research Methods Social Policy Game Theory Public Finance Investment Analysis BA Seminar Electives Financial Accounting Monetary Theory and Policy - The Impact of Global Crisis Principles of Marketing The World Economy – Retrospective View The Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME) Sector Economics of Telecommunication Demography and Economics of Contemporary European Migration Personal Finance in Practice (with Excel) Contemporary China - Genesis and Background of Chinese “Economic Miracle" Negotiations and Communication Tax Policy Energy Security and Climate Protection in The European Union Risk Management 2
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Introduction to Intercultural Management Accounting in Financial Institutions Introduction to Innovation Economics The Monetary and Credit System in the Light of the Global Financial Crisis Investing in Capital Markets Teaching Staff Wojciech Bieńkowski Arun D’Souza Bogna Gawrońska-Nowak Wojciech Grabowski Krystyna Iglicka Jarosław Jura Piotr Kłossowicz Agata Kocia Andrzej Kondratowicz Łukasz Konopielko Katarzyna Kopczewska Maciej Krzak Andrzej J. Kurnicki Dr. Konrad Leśniak Karol Lutkowski Maciej Malicki Rafał Matera Richard Mbewe Andrzej Nałęcz Jarosław Neneman Dariusz Rosati Krzysztof Szczygielski Maciej Turała Anna Wasiela Piotr Woźniak Useful Vocabulary and Terms Appendix A - Directions to Students at Examinations Appendix B – Interim Verification and Appeals Procedure Appendix C – Unfair Practice Procedure Appendix D – Student Complaints Procedure

85 87 88 90 92 93 93 94 94 96 96 97 98 98 98 99 100 101 101 102 102 103 104 105 106 106 107 107 108 109 109 111 112 114 122 133

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

THE PROGRAMME Basic Information Lazarski University offers undergraduate Programme in Business Economics (BA in BE). It takes three years (six semesters) full-time studying to complete the Programme. Degree scheme is offered on modular basis. All courses of the Programme are taught in English. Graduates of the BE Study are awarded Single Honour Degree, BA in Business Economics (having gained 360 credits while passing all three year programme modules). Honours degree will be awarded with first, upper-second, lower-second or third class honours. Rationale Our idea is to educate open-minded business specialists, who are able to understand, analyse and solve different socio-economic problems in company or on different institutional levels, who are flexible and able to work irrespectively of geographical and/or cultural characteristics of their future job places. We believe that studying in environment of successfully transformed economy like Polish one may contribute into teaching and learning processes. Therefore, on purpose, our Programme consists of different case studies including the ones of our region, comparative analyses, various research techniques, and multidisciplinary studying materials. Our School is the right place to discover challenges and opportunities of business in Global Economy, which also means to compare emerging markets and transition economies with well developed countries. We employ experienced field specialists who are able to show wide perspective of conducting various studies of Old and New Member States of European Union, as well as of Ukraine, Russia or former Soviet Union Republics, and developing countries of Latin America and Africa. We hope to create added value to good education patterns combining benefits from studying in interesting, changeable environment that provokes empirical studies and inspire to further investigations with solid foundations of contemporary knowledge in the field of Economics.

Aims Lazarski University BA Programme in BE aims to:  produce graduates educated in application of fundamental economic knowledge to real-life managerial, financial, ethical, and analytical problems encountered in business;  produce graduates who are properly equipped to develop their skills and professional interests to become key players in business irrespective of geographical location of their future job places and task diversification they may be given;  produce graduates who are aware how to apply their knowledge and skills effectively to many areas of their interests including strictly business as well as institutional and policy-making environments of business.  make students aware how to use the quantitative methods in appropriate way, i.e. solving different economic problems (on both micro- and macro-level of economy); in particular to encourage students to acquire autonomous and universal study skills, which should result in practical, independent, and investigative way of thinking of and dealing with economy;  introduce students into empirical part of economic studies making them experience and explore current issues of global economy from different perspectives, paying special attention to some problems of emerging markets and transition economies;  to share with students best understanding of practical, multidisciplinary approach towards globalisation, integration, crises, and other complex issues appearing in micro and macro scale of contemporary global economy,  to provide students with the knowledge and skill base, from which they can proceed to further studies in Economics, related areas or in multi-disciplinary areas that involve Economics. Objectives With the completion of this Programme, graduates should have knowledge and understanding of:  fundamental concepts and theories in Economics,  evolution of contemporary economics and its practical business-oriented application,  optimisation and decision making processes,  modern management goals and tasks,  local and international development paths of a company,  basic mathematics and both quantitative and qualitative research methods,  macro environment of business including country specific and global perspectives, 4
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

 modern business and management techniques used in real life,  business ethics,  diversification of widely defined business environment including historical, cultural, and political aspects of it.

Special features:  Practical and multidisciplinary character of our studies guarantees open-minded attitude towards present challenges of global economy. English speaking student studying in multicultural environment, exploring different dimensions of integration, and globalisation, equipped with up-to-date research techniques and good knowledge of emerging and other markets of global economy should be able to meet even most demanding employer’s expectations.  Studying in Poland that has experienced intensive transformation processes quite recently is extra benefit for students. Our programme consists of different case studies including the ones of our region, comparative analyses, various research techniques, and multidisciplinary studying materials. We pay special attention to challenges and opportunities of transition economies and emerging markets. Therefore, we employ specialists who deal with new Member States of European Union, Ukraine, or former Soviet Union Republics as well as developing countries in different regions of World Economy (Latin America, Africa). Graduates They are open-minded specialists well-trained in up-to-date research techniques (quantitative and qualitative ones) and aware of socio-economic differences of contemporary world. They receive solid foundations for being specialised in different business fields. They may offer their analytical skills, they can think critically and optimise decision making processes. They are prepared to understand global economy from company and macro level. They are flexible, cosmopolitan, ready to take advantage of changeable market environment. They may become business analytics, managers, and project co-ordinators. They are ready to lead a team and be an active member of it.

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

THE DEGREE Title: Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics First year Students follow a common first year programme. Elementary economics is concerned with both theory and application and is appropriate with or without earlier economic preparation. Course in mathematics has applicative character. It forms the basis for later courses of statistics, and econometrics as well as for research methods. Introduction into Social Sciences allows students to interpret and analyze scientific literature. We also offer empirical and theoretical introduction into better understanding of current economic issues. Therefore, there are some courses devoted to Polish economy, EU economy and global economy. At this stage students are expected to be equipped with necessary fundamentals that allow them to work with models, develop analytical skills, and use more advanced techniques of solving problems.

The Basic Course Structure Core courses Title Coordinator Number of ECTS/UW credits 5/10 5/10 5/10 5/10 5/10 5/10 5/10 8/15 5/10 7/15 5/10

Mathematics Microeconomics, Introductory Introduction to Sociology

M. Malicki, Ph.D. Dr. J. Neneman Dr. J. Jura

Current issues of the European and Global Prof. dr hab. W. Bieńkowski Economy Academic Writing I Introduction into Business Macroeconomics, Introductory Introduction into Economic Analysis Economics of Integration Information Technology Academic Writing II Mgr P. Kłossowicz Dr. Ł. Konopielko Dr. A. Kondratowicz Dr. M. Krzak Prof. D. Rosati Mgr W. Grabowski Mgr P. Kłossowicz

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Second year Students take courses in: statistics, intermediate micro-and macroeconomics. Moreover, they may choose some subjects that are supposed to broaden their knowledge about a firm and about the economy and support microand macroeconomic courses. On successful completion of this level our students should be able to describe, quantify, and interpret various economic issues using their just-acquired analytical skills. They should be also more aware of their areas of interest in economics. Students are offered only elective courses during second semester allowing them to specialize in their majors and to broaden their knowledge of BE in general. The Basic Course Structure Core courses Title Intermediate Microeconomics Issues in Macroeconomic Policy Mathematical Economics Statistics Regional Economics Introduction to Strategic Management Banking and Finance International Business Law Optional Courses* (Six optional course out of eighteen) Title Financial Accounting Demography and Economics of Contemporary European Migration Personal Finance in Practice (with Excel) Principles of Marketing Monetary Theory and Policy - The Impact of Global Crisis The World Economy - Retrospective View The Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME) Sector Economics of Telecommunication Coordinator Dr A.J. Kurnicki Prof. K. Iglicka Dr. K. Kopczewska Dr. R. Mbewe Dr. M. Krzak Dr. R. Matera Dr. A. Kondratowicz Dr. Ł. Konopielko Number of ECTS/UW credits 5/10 5/10 5/10 5/10 5/10 5/10 5/10 5/10 5/10 5/10 5/10 5/10 5/10 5/10 5/10 Coordinator Dr. J. Neneman Dr. M. Krzak Dr. M. Krzak Prof. K. Iglicka Dr. K. Szczygielski Dr. R. Mbewe Dr. M. Turała Dr. A. Nałęcz Number of ECTS/UW credits 5/10 3/5 5/10 5/10 2/5 5/10 3/5 2/5

Contemporary China - Genesis and Dr. J. Jura Background of Chinese “Economic Miracle" Negotiations and Communication Risk Management Introduction to Intercultural Management Accounting in Financial Institutions Tax Policy Energy Security and Climate Protection in Dr. J. Jura A. D’Souza, MA Dr. A. Wasiela Dr. Agata Kocia Dr. J. Neneman P. Woźniak, MA 7
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

the European Union Introduction to Innovation Economics The Monetary and Credit System in the Light of the Global Financial Crisis Investing in Capital Markets Dr. K. Szczygielski Prof. K. Lutkowski 5/10 5/10 5/10

Dr. Konrad Leśniak *An elective course should have no fewer than ten students. Third year

Students may study different aspects of European integration, globalization, developing economies as well as economic analysis for business, quantitative and qualitative research methods, labour- and regional economics, various approaches towards finance and management. The Basic Course Structure Core courses Title Coordinator Number of ECTS/UW credits 2/5 5/10 5/10 3/5 5/10 5/10 5/10 3/5 5/10 5/10 7/15 10/20

Research Proseminar Accounting Managerial Economics International Economics Intermediate Macroeconomics Econometrics Research Methods Social Policy Game Theory Public Finance Investment Analysis BA Seminar

Dr. Ł. Konopielko Dr. M. Turała Dr. J. Neneman Prof. K. Lutkowski Dr. B. Gawronska-Nowak M. Malicki, Ph.D Dr. J. Jura/Mgr. W. Grabowski Prof. K. Iglicka Dr. J. Neneman Dr. J. Neneman Dr A. Kurnicki Dr. B. Gawrońska-Nowak

ASSESSMENT Teaching and Learning Part I of the Programme (1st and 2nd semester) carries 120 credits, on the basis of eleven core modules, nine modules worth 10 credits each and two modules worth 15 credits each. Part II of the Programme (3rd and 4th semester) carries 120 credits, on the basis of eight core modules and six electives. Four core modules and six electives are worth 10 credits each. The other four core modules are worth 5 credits each. Part III of the Programme (5th and 6th semester) carries 120 credits, on the basis of twelve core modules. One of the core modules is worth 20 credits (containing BA Thesis), seven of them worth 10 credits each, and three of them worth 5 credits each and one of them worth 15 credits. Students’ presence in all classes is obligatory. Absence in 3 classes without serious reasons may lead to failing 8
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

the course. Repeated unexcused absence (more than 3 classes missed) may lead to deleting a student from the Programme by the Programme Director. Student can excuse his/her absence due to illness and other serious reasons. All absences must be reported to the Programme Director. Students, who without good cause, fail to complete their forms of assessment by the required date or absent themselves from examinations, will be awarded a zero mark for the component concerned. Contact Hours Each course of 10 credits will require about 100 hours of student workload. This includes:  30 hours of contact time comprising lectures, seminar and consultation  70 hours of individual study, including preparation of course work, presentation, written papers and examination. Each course of 5 credits will require about 50 hours of student workload. This includes:  15 hours of contact time comprising lectures, seminar and consultation  35 hours of individual study, including preparation of course work, presentation, written papers and examination. Methods of Assessment The accepted methods of assessment include:  Examination papers (mid-term and final)  Term papers  Problem sets  Group work  Case studies  Written assignment  Debates  Discussions  Essays  Written tests  Strategic games  Presentations in class  Active class participation and quizzes  BA Thesis project Indicative proportion of the assessment methods Final examination 20% - 60% Mid-term exam 20% - 30% Case studies, projects, tests 20% - 60% Essays, written assignments 10% - 40% For particular course assessment method consult its syllabi. The Structure of Assessment Part I-II Semester I,II,II,IV: Assessment of each module will be based mostly on a written examination lasting usually 2 hours or a combination of a shorter examination (1.5 hour) and project/case study paper (2000 words). Additional methods are listed in the course descriptors and in the summary of the assessment methods. Part III Assessment of each module is mostly the same as in the previous semesters, except for Thesis Project. The thesis should not exceed 10,000 words. Each thesis is marked independently by two members of the tutorial staff of the Programme. Students must obtain a pass on their thesis in order to obtain the BA Degree. Marking scheme 9
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Students will be assessed by the lecturers during each semester according to the following marking scheme: British scale 76-100%* 70-75% 63-69% 54-62% 49-53% 40-48% 0-39% Polish scale 5,5* 5,0 4,5 4,0 3,5 3,0 2

* In the British scale a result ranging from 76% to 100% (in the Polish scale ‘celujący’) is possible to be achieved by such a student who fulfils all the criteria listed below: 1. does scientific research or participates in group research, 2. demonstrates outstanding knowledge and skills which are beyond the module content, 3. is excellent at an analysis and synthesis of issues, 4. doesn’t make any content-related errors. Degree Criteria To be awarded BA in Business Economics Degree students must pass all three parts of the scheme. Part I (course work, 120 credits) Part II (course work, 120 credits) 33,3 % of the final grade Part III (course work 100 credits, Thesis, 20 credits) 66,7 % of the final grade Students will be graded on the basis of University of Wales award of qualifications for the undergraduates. The following table is suggested as a scale for undergraduate awards by University of Wales that the Lazarski University accepts: Scale Percentage Degree Result First Class Honours Upper Second Class Honours Lower Second Class Honours Third Class Honours Pass Degree Fail

A B+ B C+ C F

70 – 100 60 – 69 50 – 59 40 – 49 35 – 39 0 – 34

Lazarski University will assess students’ work using the above scales established by the University of Wales. One has to consider that the module pass mark is 40%. A candidate who is admitted to a modular initial degree scheme but is subsequently unable, or is not permitted, to progress to completion may, depending upon the number of credits attained at the appropriate levels at the time of 10
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

exit, qualify for one of the following awards: Credits Pursued not fewer than 120 not fewer than 240 Candidate may exit the scheme with eligibility for: Undergraduate Certificate of Higher Education Undergraduate Diploma of Higher Education

Examination Papers For Lazarski University BA Programme in Business Economics the predominant form of assessment will be written examination papers. Examinations will be conducted according to the norms set out in University of Wales Academic Regulations and Directions to Students at Examinations (Appendix A). Examination Marking According to the University of Wales regulations, students are not permitted to appeal against academic judgement of the Examiners as fairness and consistency are ensured through the double marking process. In addition, the External Examiners will review the marking process and marks awarded. Both the overall results of assessment as well as each individual student’s result will be further scrutinized at the meeting of the internal examiners and at the final, decision-making Board of Examiners Meeting. Internal As soon as possible after completion of an examination the answer papers should be passed to the Internal Examiner for marking. The marks awarded for each answer should be shown clearly on the paper. Increasingly it is the practice for papers included in the determination of the class of degrees to be 'double marked', i.e. marked by two internal examiners. Additionally, where possible and practical, consideration should be given to maintaining student anonymity during the internal marking process. When the marking is completed the answer papers should be returned to the course director. Examiners will draw the director's attention to any papers which pose problems. Such papers may include those which are marginal with respect to classification, fails and, very rarely, those suspected of irregularities. External The course director will liaise with the External Examiner and agree a selection of papers to be proposed for further scrutiny by the External Examiner and/or Moderator. It is usual for the papers of a student who is marginal with respect to his/her overall classification to be included in such a sample. The External Examiner's and/or Moderator's views should be sought on all marginal students. The precise sample can be agreed with the External Examiner and Moderator but will cover a complete range of student performances. The External Examiner's and the Moderator's views must prevail in any discussion concerning classification of students' performances. Thesis Assessment Three reviewers mark the thesis independently: the Supervisor, an Internal Examiner and the UW External Examiner, who is required to review only a sample of theses. Progression The pass mark for a module at BA level is 40%. Students are normally required to complete successfully the full annual assessment programme before being permitted to proceed to the next year of study, and students who pass all modules will automatically progress to the following year/level of study. For students who have failed some modules the regulations of a re-sit examination, module repetition and compensation can be applied as follows: Compensation: means that a student is awarded a pass grade, in exceptional circumstances, for work which was not quite of the required standard. If a student fails to pass a course, there is a possibility to compensate lacking points provided that the year average mark is higher than 40%. The compensation is possible only within the number of 4 points on any course. The practice of compensation would only be operated in exceptional circumstances. The decision whether to apply compensation or not belongs to the Examination Board. A student can compensate in both core and elective courses. The maximum total number of UW credit points to compensate is 40. Compensation can also be applied when determining the classification of any final award to be made to a student. 11
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Re-sit examination: students who have been unsuccessful in any module which contribute to the final award may be permitted up to 3 further attempts (after the first-term examination) to redeem their failure in each such module. However, there is a possibility to take one re-sit examination for each failed course during a semester. Modules recovered after a re-sit examination (or resubmission of re-sit assignment) can normally only achieve the bare pass mark (40%) in the module concerned (as opposed to the component), regardless of the mark actually obtained. A candidate may not re-sit any module or unit of assessment for which a pass-mark has been attained previously. Repetition. The students who are not able to achieve pass in the re-sit examination may repeat the module. There is a possibility to repeat a maximum of 5 modules throughout the Programme. The final grade for the repeated course cannot be higher than 40%. Deletion from the Programme The Programme Director or Examination Board may delete from the Programme a student who, i.e.: -fails more than 5 modules throughout the Programme, -fails to redeem the failure to pass any module within 3 available attempts, -has made no progress during a semester. Deleted students can be allowed to repeat an entire academic year. However, the marks for any modules in the level concerned that were already passed have to be forfeited by a student (they would not be capped).This cannot be applied to students in the final year of their studies. Absence from Examinations and Assessments Absence from any examination at a validated programme is only permitted on medical grounds (i.e. hospitalization) and satisfactory evidence for absence (a certificate of hospitalization) together with application must be submitted to the Programme Director for consideration no later than 3 days after the end of examination session. The Programme Director and the Examining Board shall have discretion to decide whether, on the basis of the evidence received, a student has been absent from examination with good cause. The Programme Director/Examination Board may also accept another excuse for not taking an examination/assessment at the time set for it stating other documented exceptional personal circumstances. A student who, without good cause, has been absent from any examination or failed to complete other forms of assessment by the required date, shall be awarded a zero mark for the examination/assessment concerned. This zero mark shall be treated as any other mark in an Examining Board's procedure for arriving at the degree result. Time-limits All requirements for the completion of the BA degree must be met within not more than 5 years from the start of the scheme. Examination Board The final decision whether a student can or cannot proceed to the next semester/year of study belongs to the Examination Board held usually at the end of each academic semester, which means that Examination Board’s decision with respect to any student is final and cannot be appealed against. Examination Board is a part of the quality assurance process. Any exceptional or mitigating circumstances, which may adversely affect student’s performance, must be reported to the Examination Board by submitting the application to the Programme Director. The main tasks of Examination Board are to: -ensure that the diet of assessment established in the course scheme has been duly administered by scrutinising examination scripts, projects, course work, and any other evidence of assessment; -ensure that marking has been fair, internally consistent, and consistent with marking in UK higher education institutions; -adjust marks, if necessary, to comply with the above objectives; -ensure that students have satisfied the course and university regulations in order to either progress or qualify for an award of the University of Wales; -determine appropriate action, such as re-sits, for students who have not satisfied the conditions for progression or qualification; -take into account any special circumstances that may have affected student performance in any element of assessment and apply appropriate measures if necessary; 12
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

-take decisions on any borderline cases; -decide final degree classifications -discuss any cases of unfair practice or other breaches of the regulations; -make recommendations for future assessment exercises. Disclosure of Marks and Feedback to Students It is important to distinguish between unconfirmed marks and confirmed marks. Unconfirmed marks are those that have not been confirmed by an annual Examining Board including the External Examiner. Confirmed marks are those that have been confirmed by an annual Examining Board including the External Examiner. Confirmed marks are released to students after having been finally approved by the Examining Board. Students are given individual feedback on their performance to date as this promotes learning and facilitates improvement. Any feedback should be constructive and timely, in order for a student to benefit from the feedback and to improve their performance If unconfirmed marks are provided, students should be made aware that any marks are subject to final confirmation by an Examining Board. Right of Appeal Students have the right of appeal in accordance with the University of Wales “Verification and Appeals Procedure” (Appendix B). UW Unfair Practice Procedure – Appendix C UW Student Complaints Procedure – Appendix D QUALITY ASSURANCE The ultimate responsibility for Quality Assurance rests with the Rector. It is exercised through a series of committees and additional measures which ensure that everyone from professors to students is involved in the process. Internal Validation Procedures (1) Rectorial Board (Senate) Duties: To oversee the general running of the Institution and to ensure that proposed alterations of academic programmes are fully discussed and agreed before implementation. To consider any other matter of relevance to its members. The Rectorial Board comprises the following members: Rector Vice Rectors Deans of the Faculties of Economy and Management; Law Heads of Departments Representatives of the Professors Representatives of junior Faculty staff Representatives of Administration Representatives of Students Meetings: At least once a semester (2) Board of each Faculty Duties: Faculty Board is an equivalent of the Senate on the level of the Faculty. Membership: Dean and his deputies (among them Course Director) Heads of Departments Senior doctors (with “habilitation”) employed at the Faculty Representatives of junior Faculty staff 13
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Representatives of Students Meetings: At least once a semester (3) BA in Business Economics Board Duties: To oversee running of the Programme (Course) and to propose alterations. Dean of the Faculty of Economics and Management Programme Director Faculty teachers in the Programme Meetings: At least twice a semester Staff – students meetings Programme Director Faculty teachers in the Programme Students of the Course Meeting: At least once a semester (5) The Examination Board Duties: To review the marks of individual students following his/her final exam and to make the decision on granting the degree at the end of the programme Membership Programme Director Internal Examiners External Examiners Meetings: At least once a year (6) Joint Board of Studies Duties: to review the Programme and to accept or reject propositions of Programme and staff changes. Membership Programme Director Moderator External Examiner Representative of the Validation Unit Representative of the Faculty Representative of Students Meetings: Once a year The Dean The overall responsibility lies with the Dean of the Faculty of Economics and Management. The Dean remains in regular contact with the Heads of Department attached to their Faculties. The Dean has a specific responsibility to review the performance of all his/her staff every two years. He supervises the work of the Programme Director. Programme Director The Programme Director, reports directly to the Dean of the Faculty of Economics and Management. He is responsible for the Course content, structure and organization. He maintains contact with the teaching staff and the students to assure the proper quality of the teaching and learning process. He arranges BA Board and Examination Board meetings. He keeps in touch with the moderator and the external examiner, and maintains contacts with the Validation Unit of the University of Wales. Students’ Programme Evaluation Students are encouraged to talk to both their own lecturers and the Programme Director regarding any problems or complaints they may have with delivery of any course. At the end of each semester, they are obliged to complete a questionnaire on each course. These questionnaires are regularly reviewed by the Programme 14
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

(4)

Director and by the Dean of Economics and Management Faculty. Staff Appraisal Scheme The Dean of the Faculty reviews any staff changes proposed by the Programme Director. In general, direct responsibility for staff appraisal rests with the heads of departments and through them with the Dean of the Faculty. Ultimate responsibility rests with the Rector. The Head of Department calls regular evaluation meetings of lecturers employed in the Department and sets the performance objectives of the unit. The Head reviews the syllabi, discusses the content of the courses, visits the classes taught by junior staff and provides feedback about performance. He/she also acknowledges the achievements and reacts in case of students’ complaints. Each Faculty has also a Committee for Staff Appraisal which reviews teachers’ performance by reviewing it every two years. The evaluation process concerns the following:  research and publication  teaching performance  activities in professional associations and organizations  student evaluation. The Rector additionally collects information about the academic staff from the Student Union and from the Deans who receive feedback on the academic performance of the staff from the heads of departments and the students. The results of lecturer’s overall assessment constitutes the basis for reward, promotion or dismissal. ADMISSION PROCEDURES Lazarski University accepts Bachelor’s degree candidates on the basis of their secondary education achievements. For applicants whose first language is not English, a certificate of proficiency in the English language is required. The required documents are:  Original or certified true copy of second level diploma (A-level certificate or appropriate local equivalent) translated into English by a sworn translator  Original or certified true copy IELTS, Cambridge Advanced/ Proficiency, TOEFL scores, for applicants whose first language is not English To be eligible for admittance to study, a candidate shall have attained the age of 17 years or over at the time of entry. ERASMUS STUDY IN BABE PROGRAMME There is a possibility for BABE students to take a part in Erasmus study during the 4th semester. For more information please contact the Programme Director. ADMINISTRATIVE ISSUES ACADEMIC YEAR 2011/12: important dates Winter semester dates: 29/09/2011 - 13/01/2012 Winter semester examination session dates: 16/01/2012 - 27/01/2012 Winter semester re-sit examination session dates: 01/03/2012 - 14/03/2012 Summer semester dates: 13/02/2012 - 18/05/2012 Summer semester examination session dates: 28/05/2012 - 08/06/2012 Summer semester re-sit examination session dates: 03/09/2012 - 14/09/2012 15
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

USEFUL ADDRESSES www.lazarski.edu.pl www.wales.ac.uk http://www.lazarski.pl/en/faculties/validated-studies-registrar/ http://www2.lazarski.edu.pl/zasoby/ USEFUL INFO Students are asked to contact the Validated Studies Registrar personally (362 room/3rd floor/sector F), by phone (022 54 35 369) or e-mail (validated.studies@lazarski.edu.pl) when they, i.e.: -need an application form to the Programme Director and want to submit it to him; -need a statement about their student status; -change their personal details, address, e-mail address or telephone number; -face a sudden personal situation that has influenced their current mode of studies; -have lost their ID card; -have a disability; -wish to withdraw; -have a complaint; -have any other issues related to the studies. REGISTRATION WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF WALES During the first semester of studies, Lazarski University registers each student of a validated programme to the University of Wales Student Database. Lazarski supplies the UW with a student’s registration details including their individually set email address of Lazarski i.e. name.surname@lazarski.pl . Please contact it@lazarski.edu.pl to learn your Lazarski’s email address and how to access it. With these details, the UW will be able to set up an account for a student to use UW Global Campus (which the Online Library is part of). Each student then receives the Welcome Email from the UW with login details to access the Global Campus (this email and any further emails from the UW will be sent to a student’s Lazarski’s email address and not a private one). As a University of Wales student, through the Global Campus access they will be able to i.e.:  have access to information about the University of Wales,  network with students all over the world through the University’s website,  use the University of Wales Online Library of high quality electronic databases, eJournals and eBooks (see Welcome to the Online Library video,  complete an International Student Survey on study experience,  apply to act as Student Representative on University of Wales committees. Additionally, students are recommended to read the Guide for New Students and myWales - An Introduction, for an overview of myWales, it's features and a welcome message from the UW Vice Chancellor. Global Campus web service offers students access to information about the University of Wales, membership of myWales social network with automatic membership of groups for a student’s course and institution, for students at collaborative institutions with validated provision, access to the University’s Online Library - a dedicated virtual library service.

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

COURSE DESCRIPTORS Mathematics LEVEL I PREREQUISITES None UNIT COORDINATOR Maciej Malicki, Ph.D. TEACHING METHOD The course will be run in the form of lectures and discussion sections (supplementary course). ASSESSMENT 50%- final exam, 20%- mid-term exam given in mid November, 30%- at least 10 in-class quizzes given during discussion sections. COURSE DESCRIPTION The goal of this course is to make student familiar with basic mathematical tools used in economy and business. Topics include sets, functions of one and several variables, matrix algebra, an introduction to the derivative and integral. Some basic connections with economics will be presented, e.g. The production function, the logistic function, the Leontief input-output model, consumer surplus, etc. COURSE LEARNING OBJECIVES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Understand and apply the notion of a set and basic operations on sets; perform matrix operations, reduce matrices to row echelon form, solve systems of linear equations, use the Leontief input-output model to solve real world problems; know the definitions of a function, continuity and limit, sketch graphs of elementary functions, such as polynomial, trigonometric and exponential functions; define and use the derivative of a function, understand geometric and physical interpretations of the derivative, calculate and apply derivatives to find extreme points; know economic applications of the derivative such as marginal analysis and elasticity of demand; understand the concept of the definite and indefinite integral, have mastered basic techniques of integration such as substitution and integration by parts; understand the notions of a partial derivative of a function of several variables, gradient, level curves, extreme points and constrained extreme points. SEMESTER I CODE core HOURS 60 CREDITS 10

COURSE TOPICS  Sets  Matrix algebra and systems of linear equations  Functions, limits, and continuity  Derivative of a function of one and several variables, and its connection with extreme points  Introduction to integration Required textbook: S. Warner, S. R. Costenoble, Finite Mathematics and Applied Calculus (Thomson, Brooks/Cole) ATTENDANCE AND IN-CLASS DISCUSSION  Attending classes is required. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION  Your performance in this course will be evaluated on the basis of your results on quizzes given at the beginning of discussion sections, and your scores on mid-term and final examinations. Instructor reserves the right to make changes to this syllabus as needed. 17
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Introductory Microeconomics LEVEL I PREREQUISITES None UNIT COORDINATOR Jarek Neneman, Ph. D. TEACHING METHOD 30 hours, 80% lectures, 20% discussions ASSESSMENT Student performance on short test and final exam (1.5 hours) will constitute the basis for the final grade. Grading: tests (40%) and final exam (60%). AIMS Does quantity go down always when price goes up? Is price discrimination good for poor customers? Are children inferior goods? Why restaurants are open in the afternoon when they are making a loss? In order to analyse these types of questions this course aims to provide a basic understanding of the concepts of microeconomics including demand and supply; workings of the price mechanism; the role of income and price in the demand for goods. CONTENT 1. Introduction to economics 2. Thinking like economist 3. The market forces of supply and demand 4. Elasticity and its applications 5. Supply, demand and government policies 6. Consumers, producers and the efficiency of the markets 7. The cost of production 8. Firms in competitive markets 9. Monopoly 10. Game theory 11. Oligopoly 12. Monopolistic competition 13. The market for the factor of production 14. Externalities 15. Public goods LEARNING OUTCOMES At the completion of the module participants should be able to · understand conceptual framework for thinking about economic issues and problems; - to apply this framework to real-world events and policy issues. TEXTBOOK AND READING Main textbook: G. Mankiw, Principles of Microeconomics SEMESTER I CODE core HOURS 75 CREDITS 10

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Introduction to Sociology LEVEL I PREREQUISITES None UNIT COORDINATOR Dr Jaroslaw Jura COURSE DELIVERY 30 hours, 67% lectures, 33% discussion ASSESSMENT Final exam (2 hours) 60%, midterm exam 20%, 4 short in class exams 20% (5% each) COURSE DESCRIPTION AND AIMS The aim of the course is to provide students with knowledge about sociological concepts, which may be useful for future economist. Although the most rudimental classical theories are to be mentioned, stress will be put on the contemporary social features influencing strongly economic situation and selected socio-economical problems of globalizing world. Thus student will not only learn basic sociological glossary, but, what is even more important, shall be able to understand how social factors influence the economic situation in contemporary world. CONTENT 1. Beginnings of sociology as a social science. Giddens, Chapter 1 2. Social nature of “homo sapiens”. Biological fundaments of human being. Sociology versus ethology and sociobiology. Reading: Edward O. Wilson: On human nature, Chapter 2 and 7 3. Ambivalences of needs and requirements. Reading: http://www.emotionalliteracyeducation.com/abraham-maslow-theory-human-motivation.shtml Lowdon Wingo, 1977, “Objective, Subjective, and Collective Dimensions of the Quality of Life” in: Lowdon Wingo, Alan Evans, Public Economics and the Quality of Life, University of Miami; The Johns Hopkins University Press, pp 13-27 4. Decision making, exchange theories. Reading: George C. Homans, 1958, Social Behavior as Exchange, The American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 63, No. 6 5/6. Socialization, interaction and identity. Reading: Max Weber "The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism", Chapter 1,2 and 5 http://www.ne.jp/asahi/moriyuki/abukuma/weber/world/ethic/pro_eth_frame.html Giddens, Chapter 6 7. Society and Culture Reading: Konecki Krzysztof, “Reproduction Of Organizational Culture – What Does Organizational, Culture Recreate?” Problems and Perspectives in Management, Vol. 4, issue 4: 26-41, 2006 8. Classical concepts of social structure (micro, mezzo and macrostructure) and social class. Are they still relevant in contemporary world? Giddens, Chapter 9 9. Social institutions and bureaucracy. Giddens, Chapter 16 Recommended reading: A. M. Henderson, Talcott Parsons, Max Weber, 1947, The Theory of Social and Economic Organization, Oxford University Press, pp 324 – 341 10. The changing world – globalization, transformation, hybridization etc. – new concepts for new era. Giddens, Chapter 2 Recommended reading: Jeremiah J. Sullivan, 2002, The Future of Corporate Globalization: From the Extended 19
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

SEMESTER I

CODE core

HOURS 45

CREDITS 10

Order to the Global Village. Quorum Books. pp. 7-28 11. Changing family and gender role. Giddens, Chapter 7 and 12 12. Internet influence – virtual society Giddens, Chapter18 LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this module a student should be able to: 1. recognize and analyze some basic sociological concepts 2. understand similarities and differences between sociology and economics 3. understand how social features influence economic situation of contemporary world TEXTBOOK A. Giddens, Sociology, Blackwell, 2001

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Current Issues of the European and Global Economy LEVEL I UNIT COORDINATOR Prof. Wojciech Bienkowski wbienkowski@gmail.com Assistant TEACHING METHOD 30 hours, 70% lectures, 30% group work, case studies, problem sets ASSESSMENT Exam (1.5 hour) 60%, midterm 20%, activity 20% (strategic game, papers, active participation at classes) OFFICE HOURS Monday 4-5 pm, Dean Office 3rd floor, room 363 or e-mail the Assistant in case of general questions. AIMS To provide students with knowledge of European integration and globalisation (theory and practise). This course will analyze major issues with respect to international movements of goods, services, capital and people in the era of globalisation. The course will also address some aspects of economic growth and development such as a problem of efficiency or competitiveness of different socio-economic models, the role of government in conducting economic policies and some ecological challenges, which may force us to restructure some of our priorities CONTENT 1) Economic integration and globalisation as natural phenomenon of development-old and new determinants 2) Economic, Political and Social Consequences of Integration and Globalisation 3) International economic institutions (IMF, World Bank, WTO) and its impact on globalization 4) Multinational corporations and capital groups as new powerful actors in global economy 5) European Monetary Union, Euro, European Central Bank 6) European enlargement and its impact on Poland and her economic growth and competitiveness 7) Financial crises and its impact on small and midsized countries like Poland LEARNING OUTCOMES The course will provide the participants with: - the background to understand the opportunities and challenges posed by a rapidly changing international economic environment - basic tools to analyze and understand European integration and globalisation - understand economic aspects of more integrated world economy and the choices the government have to make to make their economies competitive READING MATERIAL High quality survey articles of academic publications such as the International Journal of Social Economics. Students will have to analyze and critically assess material published in weekly and daily publications such as The Economist, The Financial Times, Business Week, Fortune or Forbes RECCOMMENDED READING Charles W. L. Hill “Global Business Today “McGraw Hill International Edition 2008, or “International Business .Competing in the Global Market Place” McGraw Hill. International Edition , 2010 related chapters Supplementary readings (selected chapters and/or selected pages) : 1. 2. The World competitiveness yearbook”, IMD, 2011 Poland: Competitiveness report 2011” World Economy Research Institute”. WSE, Warsaw, 2011 21
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

SEMESTER I

CODE core

HOURS 30

CREDITS 10

3. 4. 5. 6.

R. Piasecki, M. Wolnicki, “The Evolution of Development Economics and Globalization”, International Journal of Social Economics, London – New York, March 2004. J. Bhagwati, In Defense of Globalization, Oxford 2004. J. Stiglitz, Globalization and its Discontents, New York & London, 2005 The Global Competitiveness Report 2011-2012, WEF, 2011

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Academic Writing LEVEL I PREREQUISITES Level of English – B2. UNIT COORDINATOR Piotr Kłossowicz, MA LEARNING APPROACH 60 hours during two semesters, 30 hours each semester. Solving exercises, short lectures, analysing longer essays and others texts (which students are expected to read at home), discussion, depending on the content of each class. ASSESSMENT Course requirements for the 1st term: mid-term test (20%), four in-class-essays (20%), Academic Writing Conversation Classes final test (10%), summary of a long essay (10%), 1,000-word essay (10%), end-of-term inclass essay (30%), Course requirements for the 2nd term: mid-term test (20%), four in-class essays (20%), 2,000-word essay (20%), Academic Writing Conversation Classes final test (10%), end-of-term in-class essay (30%). AIMS This course will help students to participate actively in all forms of written assessment made in English – especially to write examination papers and to prepare dissertation. CONTENT The course will focus on two activities: preparing & writing an essay and reading model essays. Preparing for writing an essay. Students will practice a variety of exercises. These will range from error correction to paraphrasing, depending on the content. The following issues will be covered: A) punctuation (participle clauses, defining & non-defining relative clauses, subordinate clauses, indirect speech, etc.) B) linking words C) avoiding repetition as opposed to repetition for emphatic purposes D) emphatic sentences & inversion. E) paragraph & outline of the essay, sequencing ideas F) personal & impersonal tone G) formal register and its characteristics H) quotations, footnotes and & dealing with sources Students will write essays on a regular basis. Apart from that, they will prepare longer essays for the end of the course. It will be guided work and they will be required to produce outline for a specific date and the essay a week before the end of the term. Students will read essays in order to summarize them, both during classes and as written tasks. These summaries will make them aware how to focus on the main ideas of the text. Students will also be asked to prepare outlines for these essays as well. LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of the module students will be able to write papers and essays in English on a variety of topics and be able to do short research. TEXTBOOKS Hogue, A., Oshima, A., Writing Academic English, Addison Wesley, 1991 Jordan, R.R., Academic Writing Course, Longman, 2002 Macpherson, Robin, English for Academic Purposes, Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN, Warszawa, 2004 Handouts. 23
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

SEMESTER I/II

CODE core

HOURS 180

CREDITS 20

Introduction into Business LEVEL I PREREQUISITES None UNIT COORDINATOR Dr Łukasz Konopielko COURSE DELIVERY 30 hours (lectures 30%, empirical case studies 30%, economic games 30%, discussion 10%) ASSESSMENT Paper presentation – 30%; economic game preparation/homework 20%, final exam 50%, BRIEF DESCRIPTION During this course students are introduced to general business principles that they can apply to their everyday lives. Through hands-on activities, tasks and projects, students will explore the basic principles of management and economics. The course will try to give a practical introduction into business activity by seeking to explore available cases of business practice as well as identifying links between economic theory and business reality. AIMS Primary, this course will attempt to introduce students into business practice by allowing them to address real business problems in everyday life. Secondly it will also attempt to create experiments in order to illustrate basic economic principles. The main aim is to equip students with necessary learning skills which will prove useful for applying economic concepts to interpret real-world phenomena in business CONTENT  Introduction. How far is economic theory from business practice? Applied economy and its applications. Market Experiments: the laboratory versus the classroom.  Data collection and analysis. Methods of data collection for business purposes.  Principles of market - experiments related to demand curve, marginal utility, market clearing and auctions.  Market structure and behaviour – case study of selected examples of various structures and experiments relating this topic. Experiments related to pricing systems. Role of marketing and advertising.  Enterprise – structure, major indicators, general characteristic. How to value company? How to read financial statements? Experiments linked with coordination problems.  Fixed versus variable costs in practice – does it work?  Business case – an economic side of business projects  Business plan – where theory meets reality. Case study: In search of your own business.  Input markets. Labour and capital markets. Experiments and cases relating discriminatory hiring practices, human capital value and stock exchange.  Business environment. Taxation, economic growth, trade liberalization, globalisation and their influence on business. The underlying concepts of international business, the nature and evolution of the multinational enterprise and international business strategies. LEARNING OUTCOMES Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:  Identify and interpret economic processes in surrounding world  Understand the breath and scope of business  Design and run economic experiment  Understand and explain the power of economic theory  Illustrate economic principles by real cases.  Understand the nature of firm, business-plan and financial statements.  Learn how to tackle business problems  Critically examine business trends and relate them to the underlying economic concepts. 24
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

SEMESTER I

CODE core

HOURS 30

CREDITS 10

TEXTBOOKS J. Sloman, K.Hinde, Economics for business, 4th edition, (Harlow, FT Prentice Hall, 2007). RECOMMENDED READING. D. Friedman, A. Cassar, Economics Lab, (London, Routledge, 2004) M. Wittzel, Management: the basics (New York, NY, Routledge, 2004) S. Levitt and S.Dubner, Freakonomics : a rogue economist explores the hidden side of everything (New York : William Morrow, 2006) Rugman, A., S. Collinson; International Business, 4th edition, (London, Prentice Hall, 2006)

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Introductory Macroeconomics LEVEL I SEMESTER II CODE core HOURS 75 CREDITS 10

PREREQUISITES Introductory Microeconomics, Mathematics UNIT COORDINATOR Dr. Andrzej Kondratowicz, Associate Professor COURSE DELIVERY 75 hours:  30 hours of lectures  supplemented by 45 hours of problem solving and other exercises/discussions ASSESSMENT Apart from the final and midterm exams, short quizzes checking student’s preparedness will be administered. Quality and timeliness of homework assignments, as well as student’s active participation in class discussions will also be taken into consideration. Exact split of the above elements will be as follows: 40% = Final exam 20% = Midterm Exam 20% = In class short quizzes 20% = Homework assignments and in-class performance AIMS To provide students with knowledge of introductory macroeconomics. To make them familiar with basic macroeconomic categories, mechanisms, and models. To provide them with basic quantitative methods to analyse economy. CONTENT 1. Subject of macro-analysis and stylized macroeconomic facts 2. Measurement of economic activity and its outcomes – circular flow of goods and services and social accounting 3. Introduction into long run macro-analysis 4. Factors of production. Macroeconomic production function. 5. Labor and labor market. 6. Money and Banking 7. Short run macro: simple Keynesian Model. Multiplier analysis 8. IS-LM model (closed economy, graphical exposition) 9. Role of the government – economic policy in the short run LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this module a student should be able to:  Define and measure main macroeconomic categories  Identify main sectors of an economy and flows between them  Measure the economic flows [national/social accounting]  Know what an economic model is and how to build and handle one.  Understand the basics of comparative statics analysis and use simple maths for multiplier analysis  Distinguish between short and long run analyses and models  Know the determinants of output in the long run.

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics



 

Know the basics of short run fluctuations: understand and be able to use the basics the simple Keynesian [algebra and graphic exposition] and the IS-LM model [mostly graphical exposition and analysis] – both in closed economy version) Describe and know how to measure the effects of basic types of macroeconomic policies in the short run Find, retrieve and process reliable, high quality primary macroeconomic data from the internet sources

TEXTBOOK N. Gregory Mankiw, Principles of Macroeconomics, South-Western College Pub; 5 edition (2008) [earlier editions acceptable] Supplemented by: Robert Hall, John Taylor, Macroeconomics: Economic Growth, Fluctuations, and Policy, W.W. Norton and Co., New York and London – editions from 3 up acceptable [only specific fragments of Part I, i.e. Fundamentals of Macroeconomics will be assigned; attention: ed. 5 has tthree authors: Robert E. Hall, John B. Taylor, David Papell, while starting with edition 6 (2004) again two: Robert E. Hall & David Papell] ADDITIONAL READING Students may want to consult any other of many available quality textbooks in macroeconomics (basic level) – consult lecturer for more information; one suggested text would be Gwartney, Stroup, MacPherson, Sobel, Economics. Private and Public Choice, South-Western College Pub. any post-2000 edition. During the course many quality internet sources of information and primary data will be identified and used – both European and American.

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Introduction into Economic Analysis LEVEL SEMESTER CODE I II core INSTRUCTOR Dr. Maciej Krzak, maciej.krzak@lazarski.pl Discussions: Maciej Krzak, Group 1/ Maciej Malicki, Ph.D., Group 2 COURSE DELIVERY Lectures: 45 hours Discussions: 45 hours ASSESSMENT Comprehensive final exam: 60%; midterm – 20%; five quizzes – 20% GRADING POLICY I will apply the grading scale published in the Students’ Handbook (p.10). Cheating and plagiarism will be prosecuted. Three absences in either the lecture or discussions will automatically trigger a report to the Programme Director and may result in a grade incomplete in the course. Cell phones and laptops should be switched off during classes. HOW TO SUCCEED IN THE COURSE It is a hard class because of mathematics used. You should study systematically and solve problem sets that are given at the end of each paragraph of Chiang’s book. However, this may prove insufficient. Your Teaching Assistants will provide you with more examples during discussions. You should discuss your homework with the TAs. Do your homework independently to be sure that you understand the material covered. BRIEF DESCRIPTION and AIMS This course is an overview, how you can use mathematics to solving economic problems. We will discuss static (equilibrium) analysis and comparative static analysis in micro- and macroeconomic context. We will examine, how marginal analysis is used as a tool in decision-making process. The course will show building blocks of basic models that are in common use by scores of economists thousands of times per day. Since you have had a basic microeconomics course so far, most of our examples will refer to this part of economics. However your learning of macroeconomics will be in progress during this semester, which will render the opportunity to venture into this territory, mostly in the second part of the course. We will discuss models of macroeconomic policy in a formal mathematical setup. CONTENT Static Equilibrium Analysis  Economic Reasoning and Analysis  Partial Market Equilibrium – A Linear Model Chiang ch. 3  General Market Equilibrium – Two- and N-Commodity Case, Chiang ch. 3  Keynesian National-Income Model, Chiang ch. 3.5  Linear Algebra – Vectors and Matrices: Chiang, ch. 4  Cramer’s Rule – Chiang, ch.5  Keynesian model  Linear IS-LM Model: Government Policy in a Closed and Open Economy, ch. 5.6  Leontief Input-Output Model, ch. 5.7 Comparative-Static Analysis (comparing equilibria)  Revision (your responsibility) of derivatives - ch. 6  Derivatives of functions of many variables – ch. 7  Applications of derivative rules into economics, e.g. Marginal and Average Revenue and Cost Functions – ch. 7.2  Comparative-Static Analysis of Basic Models – ch.7.5 MIDTERM (1,5 hours on April 6, 2011; there will be a lecture as well)  Differentials and Point elasticity – ch. 8.1 and 8.2 28
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

HOURS 90

CREDITS 15

Comparative Statics of General-Functions Model – Total Differentials and Derivatives. Derivatives of Implicit Functions, ch. 8  Keynesian and IS-LM Models Revisited ch. 8.6  Optimization as a Variety of Equilibrium Analysis: Profit and Cost Functions ch. 9.1 – 9.4  Attitudes Toward Risk - ch. 9.3*  Optimization of Functions with Many Variables – Chiang ch.12.1  Utility Maximization and Consumer Demand; Lagrange Multipliers ch. 12.5 COMPREHENSIVE FINAL EXAM !  LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the course students will be able to:  Understand the concept of partial and general market equilibrium  To use comparative static analysis and grasp its limitations  Apply different approaches to comparative-statics of general-function models (total derivatives and total differentials and the implicit-function rule)  Apply comparative static-analysis to basic economic models such as: partial and general equilibrium models, simple Keynesian models, IS-LM model, Ricardian Equivalence  Understand how optimization techniques are used by economists in the context of comparative-static analysis, e.g. in the consumer choice model TEXTBOOKS Alpha Chiang and Kevin Wainwright, Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics, McGraw Hill, 4th Edition, 2005 (chapters 3 through 9) *) if time lets

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Economics of Integration LEVEL I UNIT COORDINATOR Prof. Dariusz Rosati COURSE DELIVERY 30 hours (lectures 90%, discussion 10%) ASSESSMENT Final examination 60%; mid-term 40%. BRIEF DESCRIPTION The course will cover most important issues in economic integration, in particular in the context of current developments in the global and European economy. Both theoretical foundations and practical application of integration policy will be included. The focus will be on the economic and monetary integration within the framework of the European Union as the biggest, most advanced and most powerful integrating bloc in the world. The course will, however, include also issues specific for integration in other parts of the world. AIMS The course is intended to get the students acquainted with the economic and political rationale for, as well as effects of international economic integration, especially in the European context. Moreover, is should allow to apply basic concepts of macro- and microeconomics to integration process analysis as well as identify major effects and outcomes of economic integration. The students will be familiarized with the current issues of European integration, including the operation of the single market and the functioning of the euro area. CONTENT  Concept of economic integration and its stages (free trade area, customs union, common market, monetary union, political union)  Economic and political rationale for creation of integration blocs  Mechanism and effects of economic integration – theoretical approach (static and dynamic effects)  Economic integration in Europe – customs union, single European market (four freedoms)  Economic integration in Europe - legal and institutional system, common policies  Monetary integration – theoretical underpinnings,  Monetary integration - establishment of EMU, costs and benefits of common currency, institutional framework  The future of economic integration – problems and prospects  Economic integration in the world economy - different integration blocs (EU, EFTA, NAFTA, MERCOSUR), role of integration blocs in international trade (including GATT/WTO rules) LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the course students will be able to:  Recognise and discuss basic economics rationale for integration  Identify major economic blocs and key drives of their integration.  Understand and interpret economic effects of integration.  Understand the functioning of the European Union and the monetary union  Evaluate the role and mechanism of integration institutions, policies and instruments (financial and nonfinancial).  Assess prospects for further European integration .  Identify processes caused by integration. TEXTBOOKS Molle, W. The economics of European integration: theory, practice, policy, 5 th ed. (Aldershot, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, 2006). 30
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

SEMESTER II

CODE core

HOURS 30

CREDITS 10

RECOMMENDED READING. Neal, L. The economics of Europe and the European Union, (Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007). K. Anderson, R. Blackhurt, (ed.) Regional Integration and the Global Trading System, (GATT Secretariat, 1993). Ali M.El-Agraa – The European Union, ( Prentice Hall 2004). McCarthy, D. International economic integration in historical perspective, (London, Routledge, 2006) DeGrauwe, P. Economics of the Monetary Union, Oxford University Press, London, 2005, 4th edition.

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Information Technology LEVEL I PREREQUISITES None UNIT COORDINATOR W. Grabowski, M.Sc ASSESSMENT Final exam 50%, 5 quizzes 50% AIMS The aim of these lectures is to prepare students for creating various documentation (research, financial or statistical reports, university theses, etc.) by effective working with different computer programs. CONTENT  Preparing database in Microsoft Excel - The idea of database is presented for students. Students obtain information how database for economic analysis shall be prepared. They are given database with nonnumerical data in the case of qualitative variables and they rearrange this database in a such way that numerical values are in all cells. Students prepare database in order to be appropriate for panel data analysis.  Graphical methods of presentation data- Students are given information concerning preparing graphs. Graphical methods of presenting qualitative data, quantitative data, time series and stock exchange data are explained. Methods of drawing pie charts, bar graphs, scatter plots and linear graphs are exercised.  Logical, address and database functions in Microsoft Excel- Various function are shown and students are given exercise, in which they have to use these functions.  Mathematical functions in Microsoft Excel-Mathematical functions are presented in Excel. Students solve simple mathematical exercises.  Mathematical calculations in Microsoft Excel- Students solve more advanced mathematical problems (for example solving integrals) using Microsoft Excel.  Financial analysis in Microsoft Excel- Basic financial functions are explained and basic categories concerning financial analysis are calculated.  Visual Basic in Microsoft Excel-Simple programmes are written in VBA. Students are given exercises, in which they have to facilitate a work in sheet after using Macro.  Microsoft Access I- Microsoft Access database is presented. Students are shown, how this database shall be prepared.  Microsoft Access II- Further work with Microsoft Access.  Mathematical expressions, graphs and tables in Microsoft Word- Students are presented how texts with mathematical expressions, graphs and tables shall be prepared in Microsoft Word.  Microsoft Power Point I- Idea of Microsoft Power Point is presented and basic functions are shown.  Microsoft Power Point II- Students conduct simple research and present the results using Microsoft Power Point LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this module students should be able to: - manage their own file sources, - prepare and format text, - make calculations and present its graphic results, - create simple database, - prepare work/project presentation. SEMESTER II CODE core HOURS 45 CREDITS 15

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

TEXTBOOK CustomGuide Inc, Word 2010 Personal Trainer (O'Reilly) CustomGuide Inc, Excel 2010 Personal Trainer (O'Reilly) CustomGuide Inc, Access 2010 Personal Trainer (O'Reilly) CustomGuide Inc, PowerPoint 2010 Personal Trainer (O'Reilly)

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Intermediate Microeconomics LEVEL II SEMESTER III CODE core HOURS 60 CREDITS 10

PREREQUISITES Introductory Microeconomics UNIT COORDINATOR Jarek Neneman, Ph. D. TEACHING METHOD 30 hours, 80% lectures, 20% problem sets ASSESSMENT Student performance on short test, home assignments and final exam (1.5 hours) will constitute the basis for the final grade. Grading: tests (40 %), and final exam (60%). AIMS The aim of this course is to give students the conceptual basis and the necessary tools for understanding modern microeconomics at the intermediate level. This course makes some use of calculus. The course covers three broad areas:    the theory of the consumer the theory of supply (including monopoly) general equilibrium and welfare

LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this module students should be able to:  understand the consumer behavior and choice, including choice under uncertainty  understanding the behavior of the firm  understand how market structure affects price and output  distinguish between partial and general equilibrium models CONTENT 1. Theory of consumer 2. Theory of firm 3. Market structure 4. General equilibrium and welfare economics TEXTBOOKS Main textbook: Varian, H. (2002), Intermediate Microeconomics, 6th ed. Supplementary textbooks: Nicholson, W., Intermediate Microeconomics, 9th ed. R. Pindyck, Rubinfeld D., Microeconomics, 6th ed.

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Issues in Macroeconomic Policy LEVEL II SEMESTER III CODE core HOURS 30 CREDITS 5

PREREQUISITES Introductory Macroeconomics, Mathematics, Introduction to Economic Analysis UNIT COORDINATOR Dr. Maciej Krzak, maciej.krzak@lazarski.pl TEACHING METHOD 30 hours, 80% lectures, 20% discussions ASSESSMENT Final Exam (1.5 hour) 60%, midterm 30%, discussions 10% AIMS Macroeconomic theory as well as policy have been the subject of an often heated debate. This course is aimed at exposing you to different schools of thought on macroeconomic policy and current controversies to highlight the consequences of alternative economic policies. It will start with refreshing your knowledge on the role of the state in the economy in order to give you a broader perspective on it. To this end, we will discuss microeconomic underpinnings of the state intervention such as public goods, externalities and monopoly and then we will proceed to counter-cyclical macroeconomic policy: fiscal and monetary policy in a setup of a small and large open economy. Thus, the IS-LM-BP (Mundell-Fleming) model will be analyzed thoroughly and rigorously and we will discuss the implications of a so-called Taylor’s rule as an alternative to the control over money supply. However, the price level is assumed as fixed in this model, which is a controversial assumption so we will move on to a richer setup, i.e. the aggregate demand-aggregate supply model (AD-AS), in which prices can change. This model will be used to discuss the relationship between inflation and unemployment and the impact of demand and supply shocks, e.g. 2011 oil shock, that hit an economy and how the macroeconomic policy should respond to them. We will discuss whether policymakers face a tradeoff between inflation and unemployment (a so-called Phillips curve) and how the time-inconsistency of optimal policy amends it. In this way, we will enter the debate on policy rules versus discretion. Arguments pro and con the central bank independence and rules for monetary policy will be outlined in this context, using the Fed and ECB as examples. On the fiscal policy side, the failure by governments to limit public deficits and debt has caused a lot of controversy among economists. These issues will be illustrated by the ongoing public-debt crisis in the euro area and the attempts to introduce rules to fiscal policy: the European Stability and Growth Pact will serve as an illustration. Countercyclical policy acts on aggregate demand. If time lets, we will complement its analysis by discussing the supply-side policies that are supposed to raise the long-run (potential) GDP. In a sense, we will come a full a circle as these are mainly microeconomic policies. The topics will include taxation, labor market policy including immigration and product market policies including horizontal and vertical aid. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the completion of the module participants should be able to: - explain key macroeconomic terms, analyze major macroeconomic trends and aggregates. - define and distinguish different policy approaches to assess the impact and efficiency of alternative macroeconomic reforms. - critically assess the potential benefits, but also the limitations of macroeconomic policies. - apply and assess alternative macroeconomic theories to real world problems and analyze and conceptualize economic policies in changing institutional frameworks. CONTENT Macroeconomic policy in the short-run: the IS_LM model The Taylor Rule 35
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

The IS-LM-BP model: macroeconomic policy under flexible and fixed exchange rates Output, unemployment and inflation –the Phillips curve Aggregate demand and supply – policies under flexible and fixed exchange rates Policy response to demand and supply shocks Rules versus discretion: time inconsistency of optimal policy Central bank independence Public Deficits and debt sustainability Supply-side economics READING Main text: Michael Burda and Charles Wyplosz, “Macroeconomics, A European Text”, Oxford University Press, 5th ed, 2009 and 4th ed., 2005 ( called BW) Additional texts: Gregory N. Mankiw “Macroeconomics “, Worth Publishers 6th ed. 2008 (GM) Rudiger Dornbusch, Stanley Fischer and Richard Starz “Macroeconomics”, McGHraw Hill 10th edition, 2008 or 9th ed. 2004. (DFS) The “Wall Street Journal” that is available at the entrances to the school lobby or in the library as the models will be applied to the actual world issues.

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Mathematical Economics LEVEL II SEMESTER III CODE core HOURS 45 CREDITS 10

PREREQUISITES Micro- and Macroeconomics, Mathematics (calculus, integrals and logarithms), Introduction to Economic Analysis UNIT COORDINATOR Dr. Maciej Krzak maciej.krzak@lazarski.pl COURSE DELIVERY Lectures: 30 hours Discussions: 15 hours (with the lecturer)) ASSESSMENT Final comprehensive exam Quizzes (4)

70% 30%

GRADING POLICY I will apply the grading scale published in the Students’ Handbook (p.10). Cheating and plagiarism will be prosecuted. Three absences without doctor’s referral automatically qualify for the grade incomplete in the course. I will report such cases to the Dean’s office. BRIEF DESCRIPTION and AIMS This course will extend your knowledge, how to use the mathematical tool-kit in economic applications. It will supplement Introduction to Economic Analysis, in which you should have learnt comparative statics, and expose you to dynamic analysis, i.e. introduce the analysis over time to you. You will learn, among others, how to compute the time value of money; how to evaluate the profitability of investment projects, bond yields and how long you should store wine or when it is optimal to chop the trees. We will also study how economies grow in simple setups, when there is only one input or two inputs. Finally, we will discuss how we can model a dynamic market model and what conditions on its parameters have to be imposed so that the market price converges toward equilibrium over time. We will discuss under which conditions the equilibrium is stable or unstable. TEXTBOOK A must ! Alpha Chiang and Kevin Wainwright, Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics, McGraw Hill, 4th Edition, 2005 CONTENT  Natural Exponential Functions and the Problem of Growth, Chiang ch. 10.  (Natural) Logarithms, Logarithmic Functions and their Application to Calculations of Elasticity and Growth Rates, Chiang ch.10  Simple Problems of Optimal Timing, Chiang ch. 10.  Proper and Improper Integrals, Chiang ch.14  Economic Applications of Integrals – Investment, Chiang ch. 14.5  Continuous Time: First –Order Linear Differential Equations, Chiang ch. 15.  Dynamics of Market Price, Chiang ch. 15.2  The Qualitative-Graphic Approach 15.6  Solow Growth Model, Chiang 15.7  Digression on the Cobb-Douglas (Production) Function, Chiang ch. 12.6 LEARNING OUTCOMES 37
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

By the end of the course students will be able to:  Use rudimentary dynamic analysis  Understand and apply the concept of time value of money  Take into account time in the economic analysis in discrete and continuous version  Learn how to cope with uncertainty in investment decisions  Solve linear differential equations  Understand neoclassical growth model in a continuous time frame

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Statistics LEVEL II SEMESTER III CODE core HOURS 45 CREDITS 10

UNIT COORDINATOR Prof. dr hab. Krystyna Iglicka TEACHING METHOD 60 hours (lectures: 30 hours, classes 30 hours). Classes based on problem solving, case studies and presentations. ASSESMENT 60% - final exam, 20% - mid-term test, 20% - projects. Students’ active class participation. AIMS The aim of this course is to learn basic statistical concepts in business, economics, and the other social sciences. Therefore a course offers a balanced presentation of fundamental statistical theories and methods, along with practical advice of their effective application to real-world problems. Beyond simply teaching of the methods, a primary objective of the course is to improve students’ ‘statistical thinking’ abilities in order to promote their beneficial use in practice. COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES Study of the methods of probability and statistical inference including; data acquisition and management, data patterns and summary measures for data, basic probability concepts, discrete and continuous random variables and their distributions, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis test, time series analysis and index numbers. The methods to be covered have been selected for their relevance to managerial decision making and problem solving and to other courses in the English track curriculum at Lazarski University. CONTENT  Data acquisition and management (data sets and data sources, various kind of data observation, data collecting, errors in data sets);  Data patterns (displays of qualitative and quantitative data, displays of bivariate data, frequency distributions, data models and residual analysis, misleading graphic presentations);  Data summary measures (measures of position, measures of variability, measures of skewness)  Basic probability concepts (random trials, sample space and events, probability distributions, basic probability theorems,  Probability distributions for discrete random variables: Poisson and binomial)  Probability distributions for continuous random variables: normal distribution);  Statistical sampling (populations, censuses and samples, simple random sampling for finite and infinite population, sample statistics and population parameters  Estimation and testing (point estimation and sampling distribution of x and selected other parameters, interval estimation of selected parameters of population, tests for population parameters);  Time series analysis and index numbers (time series, price and quantity indexes). LEARNING OUTCOMES As a result of this course, the students will be able to: 1. Generate and use basic graphical and numerical descriptive methods; 2. Apply basic estimation and testing procedures; 3. Use basic methods of the analysis of correlation; 4. Conduct simple and multiple regression analyses; 5. Apply dynamic analysis; 6. Critically evaluate statistical studies; 7. Translate and communicate the results of statistical analyses to management; 8. Manage the statistical problem solving process TEXTBOOKS Neter, J., Wasserman W. and G.A. Whitmore, Applied Statistics, fourth edition, Allyn and Bacon, 1993 Achel, A. Complete Business Statistics, sixth edition,McGraw-Hill,2006. 39
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

RECOMMENDED READING Berenson,M. L,Levine, D.M.and D. Rindskopf, Applied statistics. A first Course, Prentice Hall 1988.

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Regional Economics LEVEL II SEMESTER III CODE core HOURS 30 CREDITS 5

Prerequisites Introductory Microeconomics, Introductory Macroeconomics Unit Coordinator Dr. Krzysztof Szczygielski Teaching Method 30 hours: Lecture (50%), Workshops (50%) Assessment Final exam (40%), Term paper (30%), Work in class (30%) Aims The course will provide insights into the spatial dimension of economic systems. Students will learn how to analyze formally the influence of changes in economic space on affected communities and societies, and how to assess economic development of regions. Moreover, possible government interventions aimed at modifying regional processes or their consequences will be discussed, both in theory and in their practical application in the European context. Apart from thematic aims, the function of this course is to teach students how to review and make use of economic literature and to give them basic skills in writing academic papers. Content 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Introduction to RE; Nature, Limits and Types of Regions Factors of Regional Development Traditional Tools of Regional Economic Analysis Regional Competitiveness Assessment Practical Aspects of Work with Regional Data Regional Policy: Goals, Actors and Instruments EU’s Regional Policy

Learning Outcome Upon completion of this course students will be able to understand geographical determinants of economic success of regions, to analyze systematically economic developments in regions and their competitiveness, to understand the motives and instruments of regional policy. What is more, students will learn how to use using scientific databases and libraries and they will acquire basic skills in academic writing.

Textbook & Readings Basic “Regional Economic Development: Analysis and Planning Strategy”, Stimson, Robert J., Stough, Roger R., Roberts, Brian H.,2nd ed., 2006, Springer (available at http://www.springerlink.com from the LU library computers) Supplementary “The Web Book of Regional Science”, edited by Scott Loveridge, freely available online at http://www.rri.wvu.edu/regscweb.htm (the webpage of the Regional Research Institute of the West Virginia University)

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

“An Introduction to Regional Economics”, 3rd edition. Edgar M. Hoover, Frank Giarratani, Freely available at: http://www.rri.wvu.edu/WebBook/Giarratani/contents.htm “Macroeconomic Patterns and Stories”, Edward E. Leamer, 2009, , Springer (available at http://www.springerlink.com from the LU library computers)

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Introduction to Strategic Management LEVEL II SEMESTER III CODE core HOURS 30 CREDITS 10

PREREQUISITES: Economics, Company Law and Mathematics UNIT COORDINATOR: Dr Richard Mbewe M.Sc., PhD., MBA TEACHING METHOD: Lectures and case method approach ASSESSMENT: Final written examination – 50%, five (5) cases – 40% and 10% for class participation. AIMS: The course is aimed at introducing the student to modern techniques in strategic management. Important factors crucial in achieving success are discussed including other critical issues on a global scale. The student will be taught the decision-making process through the identification of critical factors and proposing rational solutions. CONTENT: 4. Introduction to strategy and techniques of strategic management 5. Strategic management and competitiveness 6. The company’s external environment 7. The company’s internal environment 8. Business level strategy 9. Competition and rivalry 10. Corporate level strategy 11. Global strategy 12. Acquisition and restructuring strategies 13. Issues in corporate governance LEARNING OUTCOMES: After the course, the student will be able to, both, analyze and design a company’s strategy based on directions of the shareholders. He will be equipped with appropriate tools to facilitate the decision-making process and be responsible for the decision made. TEXTBOOK: 8. Hitt M.A., Ireland R. D & Hoskisson., 2007. Strategic Management Competitiveness and Globalization: Concepts and Cases, 7th Edition. Thomson/South Western. 9. Thompson A. Arthur & A.J. Strickland., 1998. Strategic Management: Concepts and Cases. 10th Edition. Irwin McGraw-Hill. RECOMMENDED READING:  The Economist  The Financial Times  Wall Street Journal Europe  Puls Biznesu

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Banking and Finance LEVEL II UNIT COORDINATOR Maciej Turała, Ph.D. COURSE DELIVERY 30 hours (lectures 50%; discussions and tutorials 50%) ASSESSMENT  Final examination: 60%  Quizzes: 20%  Written assignment (with presentation): 20% BRIEF DESCRIPTION AND AIMS The course aims at presenting the fundamentals of finance, including the history of money creation, leading to the appearance of banking. The course concentrates on issues of bank functions and risk in banking activities. Practical references are given to the overall characteristics of monetary policy in Poland as well as to the organisation of the banking system in the European Union. CONTENT  Topic 1: Money – nature, origins and functions. The history of money creation. Concept of liquidity. Functions of money.  Topic 2: Definition and roles of banks. The banking system. Investment vs. universal banks. Privatisation of banks. Consolidation of banks. Competition between banks. Supervision over banks’ activities. Modern trends in the evolution of banking.  Topic 3: Money creation in the banking system. Development of central banks. Functions of central banks. Issue of currency.  Topic 4: Monetary policy of the central bank. Objectives of monetary policy. Instruments of monetary policy. Mechanisms for transmitting the monetary policy impulses. Monetary policy in Poland. Monetary policy instruments used by the National Bank of Poland.  Topic 5: Nature and types of banking risk. Causes of risk in banking activities. Types of risk. General principles of risk management.  Topic 6: Risk of liquidity (solvency). Theoretical principles of retaining liquidity. Measuring risk of liquidity. Current and structural liquidity. Managing liquidity.  Topic 7: Credit-related risk. Assessing individual credit-related risk. Managing a portfolio of credits.  Topic 8: Country-related risk. Operational risk.  Topic 9: Causes and ways of quantifying the interest rate risk. Managing interest rate risk. Currency risk. Types of exchange rates. Quantifying and managing currency risk.  Topic 10: Banks in the European Union – European Central Bank. Functions and structure of central banks in the EU. Governing bodies of ECB. Presentations of student assignments.  Topic 11: Banks in the European Union – European Central Bank. Functions and structure of central banks in the EU. Governing bodies of ECB. Presentations of student assignments. LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this module a student should be able to:  Describe functions of central as well as commercial banks;  Identify main sources of banking risk and provide ways of mitigating it;  Describe the overall characteristics of monetary policy in Poland;  Describe the organisation and functions of chosen EU banking institutions. RECOMMENDED READING  A. Janc, Modern banking in transition economies of Central and Eastern Europe, Poznań University of Economics, Poznań 2004. 44
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

SEMESTER III

CODE core

HOURS 30

CREDITS 5

 

Gardener E.P.M, Molyneux P., Moore B., Banking in the new Europe: the impact of the single European market programme and EMU on the European banking sector, Palgrave Macmillan, 2002. Kawalec S., Banking sector systemic risk in selected Central European countries. Review of: Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania and Slovakia, CASE, 1999.

SUPPLEMENTARY READING (in Polish)  Jaworski W.L., Zawadzka Z., Bankowość – zagadnienia podstawowe, Poltext, Warszawa, 2004.

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

International Business Law LEVEL II UNIT COORDINATOR Andrzej Nałęcz, Ph.D. COURSE DELIVERY 30 hours; lecture 15 hours (15 x 1 hour); supplementary classes 15 hours (15 x 1 hour) ASSESSMENT Projects (20%), short quizzes (20%), final written exam (60%). BRIEF DESCRIPTION This course provides students with knowledge of principal problems of business law, both in theory and practice. During the course, participants should gain the ability to interpret legal acts as well as to analyse cases. AIMS This course aims to provide students with basic knowledge about business law and to make them familiar with the requirements of starting and carrying on economic activity. CONTENT 1. The concept of law. a. Law as a set of rules. b. Law and democracy. 2. General outline of business law. a. Business law as a specific branch of law. b. Distinction between private and public business law. 3. Private business law. a. Types of business entities. i. Sole traders. ii. Partnerships. iii. Companies. b. Contracts in general. i. Parties of contracts. ii. Contractual obligations. iii. Breach of contract. c. Consumer contracts. i. Unfair contract terms. ii. Unfair commercial practices. iii. Distance selling. d. Commercial contracts. 4. Public business law. a. The principle of economic freedom. b. Common requirements for enterprises. i. Registration of businesses. ii. Registration for tax purposes. iii. Obligations under health, safety and environmental provisions. c. Business permits. d. State control of enterprises. e. Market regulation. i. Natural monopolies. ii. Universal services. 46
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

SEMESTER III

CODE core

HOURS 30

CREDITS 5

f.

iii. Regulators. Competition law. i. Concept of relevant market. ii. Infringements of competition. 1. Prohibited agreements and leniency policy. 2. Dominant position abuse. 3. Control of mergers and acquisitions. 4. Competition authorities.

LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this module a student should be able to:  Understand the specifics of business law as part of both private and public law.   Distinguish between different types of business entities. Understand the purpose of consumer protection and know the means of preventing enterprises from exploiting their privileged position in their relations with consumers. Know the common requirements of starting and carrying on an enterprise. Know the extent of state control of economic activity and its limits. Understand the purpose of market regulation and the importance of providing universal services to the population. Understand the importance of maintaining competition on the market and know the means of preventing and eliminating infringements of competition.

  



READING Phil Harris, An Introduction to Law, Cambride University Press, 2006. Jolanta Jabłońska-Bonca, Wprowadzenie do prawa. Introduction to law, LexisNexis, 2008 (bilingual textbook). Materails provided by the lecturer.

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Research Proseminar LEVEL III COORDINATOR Łukasz Konopielko, PhD COURSE DELIVERY 30 hours (introductory lectures: up to 10 hours; students’ cases and discussion 20 hours). ASSESSMENT The final grade will be based on:  Active participation in course – presentations and discussion (20 % of the final grade)  Written assignment (30 % of the final grade)  Final exam (50% of the final grade) BRIEF DESCRIPTION The aim of this course is to setup a background for proper selection as well as to first attempt to overview a topic for a B.A. dissertation. This is expected to be achieved in two ways. Primarily we will define each participant particular research interest and review possible areas of investigation. Simultaneously, we will look into data collecting techniques, research approaches to various issues in economics. This will be done by studying review papers presenting diversified research strategies. Additionally the best dissertations successfully defended at Łazarski over recent years will be reviewed. All this should lead to creation of students’ own research agendas as well as preliminary definition of dissertation topics. Based on this personal supervision proposal will be made. CONTENT  How to apply economic concepts in research? The big picture – macroeconomics vs. microeconomics for your own dissertation.  Formal requirements for good dissertation and investigation set-up  Problem identification and analysis of additional knowledge required  Application of theory in your area of interest. Model design and data collection  Intellectual property issues. LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the course students will be able to:  Understand and analyze key strengths of economics for applying it to data available.  Provide a convincing case why economics should be reckoned as the social science.  Understand and explain economic approach to various issues  Adopt flexibly economic analysis methodology to everyday life and identify issues linked with intellectual property in dissertation-writing  Develop judgments on all above. READING S.W. Bowmaker, Economics Uncut (Edward Elgar, 2005) BA dissertation handbook. SEMESTER V CODE core HOURS 30 CREDITS 5

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Accounting LEVEL III UNIT COORDINATOR Maciej Turała, Ph.D. COURSE DELIVERY 60 hours (lectures 50%, problem solving 50%). ASSESSMENT  Final examination: 70%  Quizzes: 30% BRIEF DESCRIPTION AND AIMS The course aims at familiarising the students with the role of accounting in business. The students will also acquire certain practical skills enabling them to understand how financial statements are prepared and how to use the information included in them. The course presents issues of bookkeeping, balance sheet structure, profit and loss statement, cash flow statement as well as some aspects of managerial accounting – i.e. cost calculation or breakeven point analyses. CONTENT  Topic 1: Introduction to accounting concepts. Role of accounting in business environment. Accounting as a source of information about economic activities – nature and functions of accounting, users of financial information, accounting methods. Harmonisation and standardisation of accounting.  Topic 2: Fundamental principles of accounting.  Topic 3: Elements of the financial report: balance sheet. General classifications of assets, equity and liabilities. Measuring performance – basic structure of a profit and loss statement.  Topic 4: Principles of bookkeeping and working with accounts.  Topic 5: Definitions and classifications of costs and incomes. Differentiating between accrual values (costs and incomes) and cash values (outflows and inflows of cash).  Topic 6: Major categories of costs. Major categories of incomes. Cost accounting.  Topic 7: Elements of the financial report: profit & loss statement.  Topic 8: Elements of the financial report: cash flow statement. Scope of information disclosed in a cash flow statement – operating, financial and investment activity.  Topic 9: Cost calculation.  Topic 10: Break-even point analysis. Fixed costs, variable costs, total costs.  Topic 11: Financial and management accounting – differences. Introductory issues of management accounting. Summary and revision. LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this module a student should be able to:  define the role of accounting in business;  explain the fundamental principles of accounting;  perform basic bookkeeping operations;  identify various types of assets, capital and liabilities;  calculate a financial result;  perform a break-even point analysis;  prepare a financial statement; RECOMMENDED READING  Śnieżek E., Walińska E., Frendzel M., Stępień-Andrzejewska J., Financial accounting – key problems, examples, exercises, Centrum Controllingu i Analiz Ekonomicznych, Łódź 2007. SEMESTER V CODE core HOURS 60 CREDITS 10

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Managerial Economics LEVEL III SEMESTER V CODE core HOURS 45 CREDITS 10

PREREQUISITES Basic microeconomics UNIT COORDINATOR Dr. Jarek Neneman LEARNING APPROACH 30 hours, 70% lectures, 20% problem sets, 10% discussions ASSESMENT Final written exam (90 minutes), 5 short (10 minutes) in-class tests. Short tests 30%, final exam 70%. AIMS To introduce basic concept of decision-making. Present price and nonprice strategies of firms on competitive and noncompetitive markets. Outline basic concepts and institutions of competition policy CONTENT  General characteristic of decision-making process  Decision-making in uncertainty  Value of information  Bargaining and auctions  Market structure and market power  Price discrimination  Vertical relations  Product differentiation  Advertising LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this course a student should be able to:  Analyze decision making process under uncertainty  Understand auction strategies  Understand basic firm’s strategies on competitive and noncompetitive markets TEXTBOOKS F. W. Samuelson, G. S. Marks, Managerial Economics, John Wiley and Sons 2002, L. Cabral, Introduction to Industrial Organization, The MIT Press, 2000 Varian, H. (2002), Intermediate Microeconomics, 6th ed. R. Pindyck, Rubinfeld D., Microeconomics, 6th ed.

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

International Economics LEVEL III SEMESTER V CODE core HOURS 45 CREDITS 5

PREREQUISITES Microeconomics, Macroeconomics UNIT COORDINATOR Prof. Karol Lutkowski PhD e- mail: klutko@sgh.waw.pl TEACHING METHOD 75% lectures, 25% problem solving in form of homework ASSESSMENT Student’s performance will be evaluated on the basis of the following criteria: 1/ Final Examination - 50 % 2/ Two mid-term quizzes - (25 % + 25 %) Attendance and In-class discussion is required The reference frame for grading is the standard grading scale applied at the Lazarski School of Commerce and Law AIMS The course strives – first - to make undergraduate students familiar with basic tenets of the theory of international trade, the nature of the gains from trade, factors determining the pattern of international trade, aims and instruments of trade policy, free trade versus protectionism controversy, the nature and stages of economic integration (as highlighted by the experiences of the EU) and problems posed by international factor movements. Second – it goes on to outline and explain monetary foundations of the international economic cooperation: currency convertibility, the nature and determinants of the exchange rate in the long term and the short term, the mechanics of the forex market, balance of payments equilibrium and disequilibria, essentials of the balance-ofpayments adjustment under floating and pegged exchange-rate system. The course closes with a discussion of the historical evolution and present-day structure of the international monetary system, emergence of a globalized capital market, problems of regional monetary unification and, last no least, an overview of the significance and role of the leading international economic organizations as well as prospects for an emergence of a multi-polar international financial system. LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this module a student should be able to:  Understand and analyze open economy mechanisms  Analyze international environment of business  Form rational judgements on contemporary economic issues and solve basic problems related to international business in the domain of production, trade and finance CONTENT References in the Syllabus are to respective chapters or parts of chapters of the textbook cited below) Lecture 1 - Autarchy and international economic cooperation – forms and institutional framework for cooperation (Chapter 1) Lecture 2 - Labour productivity, comparative advantage and the gains from trade; factors determining patterns of trade (Chapter 3) Lecture 3 - Importance of international factor movements and multinationals (Chapter 7) Lecture 4 - Objectives and instruments of trade policy, free trade and protectionism (Chapter 8 and Chapter 9) Lecture 5 - The balance of payments, the currency market and the rate of exchange (Chapter 13) Lecture 6 - Determinants of the exchange rate in the short run (Chapter 14) Lecture 7 - The PPP doctrine, long-run equilibrium exchange rate and the real rate of exchange (Chapter 15) Lecture 8 - Restoring external equilibrium under fixed exchage rate (Chapter 17) 51
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Lecture 18) Lecture 19) Lecture Lecture

9 - From the gold standard to the multi-currency system, the concept of an international money (Chapter 10 - Sources of strains in the present-day monetary mechanism and means of alleviating them (Chapter 11 - The nature, strengths and weaknesses of the European single-money mechanism (Chapter 20) 12 - The international financial markets and globalization (Chapter 21)

TEXTBOOK P. Krugman & M. Obstfeld – „International Economics”, the 8th Edition, Addison-Wesley Series in Economics (chapters of the textbook indicated in the Syllabus) RECOMMENDED READING Articles from the current economic and financial press, also: publications available on the web (as suggested by the instructor)

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Intermediate Macroeconomics LEVEL III SEMESTER V CODE core HOURS 60 CREDITS 10

PREREQUISITES Introductory Microeconomics and Macroeconomics, Mathematics, Introduction to Economic Analysis UNIT COORDINATOR dr. Bogna Gawrońska – Nowak TEACHING METHOD 30 hours, 67% lectures, 33% problem sets ASSESSMENT midterm (25%), short quizzes (20%), final written exam (55%) AIMS To provide students with knowledge of intermediate macroeconomics. To make them analyse macroeconomic issues connected with business environment and to teach them to understand and use macroeconomic models properly. CONTENT 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Economic Growth, Capital Accumulation, Total Factor, Human Capital, Technology, and Endogenous Growth and Convergence Fiscal Policy and the Role of Government Money and Prices Consumption and Investment Business Cycles Monetary Policy

LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this module a student should be able to:  Identify and interpret different macroeconomic issues  Use some of the macroeconomic models in practical way  Analyse macroeconomic policy in different time periods and in wider global context  Use some algebra for analytical purposes in macroeconomics. TEXTBOOK D. Miles, A. Scott, Macroeconomics and the Global Business Environment, John Wiley & Sons, 2004 RECOMMENDED READING O. Blanchard, Macroeconomics, 5th edition, Prentice Hall, 2008 N. G. Mankiw, Macroeconomics, Worth Publishers, 2002 The Economist, various issues.

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Econometrics LEVEL III SEMESTER V CODE core HOURS 75 CREDITS 10

PREREQUISITES Mathematics, Statistics UNIT COORDINATOR Maciej Malicki, Ph.D. TEACHING METHOD Lectures and supplementary classes ASSESSMENT 55%- final exam, 10%- midterm, 20%- project, 15%- in-class quizzes given during discussion sections COURSE OBJECTIVES The goal of this course is to make student familiar with basic methods of econometrics. Topics include simple and linear regression models, heteroscedasticity, autocorrelation, maximum likelihood estimation, and times series. A special emphasis will be put on examples and applications. CONTENTS 1. Introduction to Econometrics 2. Simple Linear Regression Model (SLR). OLS-estimation. 3. Multiple Linear Regression Model (MLR): two explanatory variables. 4. Variables Transformations in Regression Analysis. 5. Dummy Variables. 6. Heteroscedasticity. 7. Simultaneous Equations Models. 8. Maximum Likelihood Estimation. 9. Autocorrelation disturbance 10. Modelling with Time Series Data. TEXTBOOK: D.N. Gujarati, Essentials of Econometrics.

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Research Methods LEVEL III PREREQUISITES None UNIT COORDINATOR Dr Jaroslaw Jura SECOND LECTURER Wojciech Grabowski, MA COURSE DELIVERY 30 hours – 40% lecture, 10% discussion, 50% problem sets ASSESSMENT Group project presentation 70% (2 presentations: research report (40%) and econometric problem analysis 30% – written), 2 short written assignments (in class) 10% (5% each), 2 homeworks 10% (each homework 5%), 2 quizzes 10% (each quiz 5%) COURSE DESCRIPTION AND AIMS The purpose of this course is to provide students with basic methodological knowledge about conducting research and data analysis in economics and related areas. The whole course is practically oriented and the main aim of it is to help the students in their future BA thesis projects. As this is most probably their first independent research of that complexity level much of the effort must be made to introduce useful concepts and methods with clear recognition of their applicative character. Despite the practical character of the course some general theoretical information about research methodology will be presented. Taking into account the fact that most of the students are not experienced enough in doing research, therefore, formulation and preparation phases of the research project must be studied carefully. Thus student will be directed towards obtaining ability how to formulate their own research problems and research questions. Later on they will be taught how to operationalize their problems and questions and how to find possible best method of data collecting. Although at BA level students are not supposed to present very sophisticated techniques, they should still acquire basic knowledge about collecting data methods, those that are commonly used in economics. Even if it may be not sufficient to conduct very advanced professional research students should at least know what kind of collecting data method may be useful for particular research problem – mostly in microeconomic analyze (however methodological knowledge about conducting survey research should also be useful for macroeconomists - for example information about constrains, biases and potential errors connected with this method). The last part of the course will be focused on providing some practical aspects of econometrics. It should inspire students how to search for economic time series, how to use data sources, extend their knowledge concerning linear regression model and its interpretation. They should be able to use binary choice model and interpret its parameters. The course also aims at improving students’ software capabilities, teaching them how to prepare presentations containing solutions of some econometric problems. CONTENT I. Introduction 1. Aim of the course, general introduction, theoretical approaches, theories, hypothesis and statements. 2. Research proposal: Conceptualization, Operationalization, and Measurement 55
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

SEMESTER V

CODE core

HOURS 60

CREDITS 10

II. Collecting data methods and its analysis – aspects useful for economists 3 Quantitative vs. qualitative methods, probability and sampling (definition, types), Gathering data methods 4. Interview - introduction a) Structuralized interview, questionnaire interview, b) Unstructuralized interview, in-depth interview. 5. Research preparation – designing a questionnaire 6. Research report presentation III. Practical econometric 8. Graphical analysis of macroeconomic data 9. Working with database 10. Statistical analysis of macroeconomic data 11. Introduction to regression analysis 12. Working with econometric software (I) 13. Working with econometric software (II) 14. Interpretation of research results 15. Group project presentations TEXTBOOKS 1. Dow, Sheila, 2002 Economic Methodology: An Inquiry, Oxford University Press. 2. Ghauri, Pervez, Gronhaug Kjell, 2005, Research Methods in Business Studies: A Practical Guide, Prentice Hall, New York, 3. Klein Lawrence R., Welfe Aleksander, Welfe Władysław, 1999, Principles of Macroeconometric Modeling, North-Holland

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Social Policy LEVEL III SEMESTER VI CODE core HOURS 15 CREDITS 5

UNIT COORDINATOR Prof. dr hab. Krystyna Iglicka COURSE DELIVERY 15 hours (lectures combined with case studies prepared, discussed and presented by students) ASSESMENT Students’ presentations – 40%, active participation – 10%, final exam - 50%. Students’ active class participation. AIMS The aim of this course is to learn basic concepts of social welfare and their relationship to politics and society. The course aims to deepen students’ understanding of contemporary social issues and problems by looking at how social policy issues are constructed and contested. COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES The course revolves around three main issues in debates over social policy: arguments over needs, rights and responsibilities.         Welfare and society Welfare and equality Values Social need Social security Poverty Social Exclusion Policies (health, housing, education)

LEARNING OUTCOMES The course gives students an opportunity to examine different social policies and perspectives, and the impact these have on social conditions and problems TEXTBOOKS: Hill M., Social Policy in the Modern World, Blackwell Publishing 2006 Legrand, J., C Propper, R Robinson, The economics of social problems, Macmillan 1992. RECOMMENDED READING: Spicker, P. Social policy: themes and approaches, Prentice Hall 1995. Nozick, Anarchy state and utopia, Basic Books, 1974. Titmuss, R.M. Essays on the Welfare State, Allen and Unwin 1963 The main international journals in the subject are the Journal of European Social Policy and Social Policy and Administration – selected papers from them will be delivered by the teacher

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Game Theory LEVEL III SEMESTER VI CODE core HOURS 30 CREDITS 10

PREREQUISITES Microeconomics UNIT COORDINATOR Jarek Neneman, Ph. D. TEACHING METHOD 15 hours, 70% lectures, 30% games ASSESSMENT Student performance on short test and final exam (1.5 hours) will constitute the basis for the final grade. Grading: tests (40 %) and final exam (60%). AIMS To introduce basic concept of game theory and its applications mainly in business. CONTENT Basic ideas and terminology Games with sequential moves, extended form of game Games with simultaneous moves Mixed strategies Prisoners’ dilemma Strategic moves LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this course a student should be able to: Understand basic concepts of game theory Analyze simple games Understand strategic moves TEXTBOOKS A. Dixit, S. Skeath, Games of Strategy, 2nd ed., W.W. Norton, 2004

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Public Finance LEVEL III SEMESTER VI CODE core HOURS 30 CREDITS 10

PREREQUISITES Introductory Microeconomics and Macroeconomics UNIT COORDINATOR Dr. Jarek Neneman TEACHING METHOD 30 hours, 80% lectures, 20% problem sets and discussions ASSESSMENT Student performance on short test, home assignments and final exam (1.5 hours) will constitute the basis for the final grade. Grading: tests (35 %), short assignments (5%) and final exam (60%). AIMS Show the rationale for public involvement in the economy. Discuss the issue of welfare, public choice, equity, etc. Show the importance of pension reform. CONTENT Introduction to public finance Tools of Normative Analysis Public Goods Externalities Income Redistribution, Conceptual Issues Social Insurance Introduction to taxation LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this module a student should be able to:  define public sector and its role in contemporary society;  explain the reasons for “market failure” and the need for social insurance;  understand the rationale and the tool of market intervention TEXTBOOKS H. Rosen, T Gayer, Public Finance, 7/e, McGraw-Hill RECOMMENDED READING N. Barr, The Economics of the Welfare State, 4/e, Oxford University Press.

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Investments Analysis LEVEL III PREREQUISITES Macroeconomics I UNIT COORDINATOR Dr Andrew J. Kurnicki LEARNING APPROACH 30 hours. 70% lectures 30% work on problems and cases. ASSESSMENT Final Exam 50% Research project and presentation 20% Short Examinations 20% Class participation 10% OBJECTIVE This course is design to provide participants with basic knowledge of the investment analysis, valuation of securities , industry and company analysis, and analysis of alternative investments and how to translate what the students have learned in the course to actual participation in the financial markets CONTENT 1. The Investment Setting 2. The Concept of Investment 3. Measure of Return and Risk 4. Organization and Functioning of Securities Market 5. Source of Information on Investments 6. Efficient Capital Markets 7. An Introduction to Portfolio Management 8. Markowitz Portfolio Management 9. Bonds Fundamentals and Bond Valuation 10. Analysis of Financial Statement 11. Industry Analysis 12. Company Analysis 13. Technical Analysis 14. International Diversification 15. Analysis of Alternative Investments LEARNING OUTCOMES At the completion of the module student will be able to:  show understanding of how and why are our securities market changing  discuss and explain why individuals invest and what factors determine an investor’s required rate of return on an investment ,  analyze market tendencies and risk management  describe the different roles that investment corporations play in the financial system  explain in details the nature of portfolio allocation  explain the risk connected to global investment  interpret behavior of particular securities, like stock, bonds or options  explain why financial ratios are useful and in what context they should be analyzed TEXBOOKS 1. Frank K. Reilly, Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management; The Dryden Press 2. Geoffrey A. Hirt, Stanley B. Block; Fundamentals of Investment Management, The Wall Street Journal Edition 60
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

SEMESTER VI

CODE core

HOURS 60

CREDITS 15

RECOMMENDED READING The Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal, HBR, Bloomberg News, Euromoney, the Economist

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

BA Seminar LEVEL III SEMESTER VI CODE core HOURS 60 CREDITS 20

PREREQUISITES successful completing level I and level II of studies UNIT COORDINATOR Dr Bogna Gawrońska – Nowak and Relevant BA Thesis Supervisors TEACHING METHOD 30 hours, 80% solving problems, 20% lecture ASSESSMENT 100% BA Thesis AIMS To support students with their individual research work. To make them define and analyse problems of their interest. To provide them with appropriate methods and techniques for their research. To prepare students to write BA Thesis. CONTENT 1. Initial guidance on research and BA Thesis preparation (general remarks on content, presentation, and assessment criteria) 2. Defining, measuring, and analysing complex economic issues in a given field area 3. Critical revision of relevant field literature (both theoretical and empirical) 4. Data mining techniques 5. Application of proper statistical and econometric methods 6. Selection of multimedia tools LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this module a student should be able to:  Identify and define individual research problems  Describe and know how to measure analysed issues  Make analytical assessment of the state of play in area of interest  Successfully conduct individual research  Present and be ready to discuss research effects. RECCOMMENDED READING Gujarati D. N., Essentials of Econometrics, Second Edition, 1998 (International edition), McGraw-Hill Book Company., ISBN0071163069. Green W.H., Econometric Analysis, Prentice Hall International, Inc. 2000 Appropriate field literature recommended by BA Thesis Supervisor

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ELECTIVES
Financial Accounting LEVEL II SEMESTER IV CODE elective HOURS 30 CREDITS 10

PREREQUISITES Introductory Microeconomic, Intermediate Microeconomics, Accounting UNIT LECTURER Dr Andrew J. Kurnicki LEARNING APPROACH 30 hours, lectures and case methods approach. ASSESSMENT Final exam (2 hours) 60%, research project 20%, midterm 20% AIMS The course provides students with an basic knowledge of the main areas of company financial accounting such as statement of cash flow, financial statement analysis, budgeting, the time value of money, current assets and current liabilities, shareholders’ equity. The objective of this course is the presentation of financial accounting from the point of view of the primary users of financial accounting and to use case method approach to apply basic concept in real business situation. CONTENT The course will focus on:  Accounting and Organizations  The measurement of Profit  Measurement of Wealth and the Balance Sheet  The Profit and Loss Account  Fixed Assets and Long-term Liabilities  Financing and Business Structure  Cash Flow Statement  Financial Statement Analysis  Income Valuation  GAAP basic concept LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of the module students should be able to:  List and discuss the components of the balance sheet and income statement  Describe the information contained in the statement of the stockholders equity  Use the cash flow statement to examine a firm’s liquidity position  Describe the cash flow and working capital effects of the choice of inventory methods  Examine the financial statement effects on revaluation on long-term assets.  Estimate the market value of debt and discuss its usefulness.  Compute book value per common share, free cash flow, EPS and P/E. READING: 1. Jerry Weygandt, Donald E. Kieso, Paul D. Kimmel - Financial Accounting, Wiley 4th edition 2. Gerlad I. White, Ashwinpaul C. Sondhi, Dov Fried – The Analysis and Use of Financial Statement , Wiley, 3th edition.

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Monetary Theory and Policy - The Impact of Global Crisis LEVEL II SEMESTER IV CODE elective HOURS 30 CREDITS 10

PREREQUISITES Macroeconomics I and II, i.e. knowledge of the IS-LM model, Phillips curve and AS-AD model, core mathematics including basic calculus and Cramer’s rule. UNIT COORDINATOR Maciej Krzak Ph. D. TEACHING METHOD 30 hours, 90% lectures, 10% discussions ASSESSMENT Midterm exam 30%; comprehensive final exam 60%; problem sets 10%. Participation will matter if your grade were on the border. More than three absences cause automatic grade incomplete. AIMS The aim of the course is to give a student an up-to-date overview of the monetary theory in a non-technical way. This theory will be confronted with the actual conduct of monetary policy by various countries including the USA, the euro zone and Poland. The emphasis will be put on explaining how monetary policy reacted to the recent global financial crisis, when liquidity disappeared on financial markets and how further monetary easing was achieved, when the central bank interest rates reached zero-bound, i.e. we will explain the role of quantitative easing. In this context, we will also discuss how financial markets react to changes in monetary policy by supplementing the textbook material with discussions of articles from the economic and financial press, in which we will use the analytic frameworks developed in class to help us understand developments. CONTENT  Why study money (ch. 1)  What is money (ch. 3)  Understanding interest rates (ch. 4)  Central Banks (ch. 15)  Multiple Deposit Creation and the Money Supply Process (ch. 16)  Determinants of the Money Supply (ch. 17)  Tools of Monetary Policy (ch. 18)  Conduct of Monetary Policy in USA and in Eurozone: Goals and Targets ch. 19  Midterm  Demand for Money (ch. 21)  Review of Effects of Monetary Policy in Mundell-Fleming Model (ch. 23)  Review of Effects of Monetary Policy in AS-AD Model for the Open Economy (ch. 24)  Transmission Mechanisms of Monetary Policy - Theory and Empirical Evidence (ch. 25)  Money and Inflation: Time Inconsistency of Monetary Policy (ch. 26)  Rational Expectations, New Classical Economics – Implications for Policy (ch. 28) LEARNING OUTCOMES At the completion of the module participants should be able to  understand what is money, why we need it  understand how modern central banks operate  understand how monetary policy is conducted and point to its limitations  apply the theories to analyze the effects of monetary policy on financial markets and real economy TEXTBOOK AND READING Main textbook: Frederic Mishkin The Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets, 8th Edition, AddisonWesley: Reading, Mass. 2006 64
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Outside reading (chronological order): Ben Bernanke and Frederic Mishkin, “Inflation targeting”, JEP, 1997. or Ben Bernanke, Thomas Laubach, Frederic Mishkin and Adam Posen, “The Rationale for Inflation Targeting” ch.2 in: Inflation Targeting, Princeton University Press, 2001. Frederic S. Mishkin, Structural Issues for Successful Inflation Targeting in Transition Countries, proceedings from the Annual Int’l Conference of the National Bank of Poland, 2002. Frederic S. Mishkin, “Monetary Policy Strategy: Lessons from the Crisis,” prepared for the ECB Central Banking Conference, Frankfurt, November 18–19th, 2010. Beyond 2010: Policy Challenges”, WEO IMF, part of chapter 1 pp. 42 - 50, October 2009. Jürgen von Hagen, Jean Pisani-Ferry and Jakob von Weizsäcker, „ Exit: Time to Plan, Bruegel Institute, October 2009. ECB, “Asset Price Bubbles and Monetary Policy Revisited,” Monthly Bulletin, November 2010. Otmar Issing, „Lessons for Monetary Policy: What Should the Consensus Be?”, IMF Working Paper, April 2011.

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

Principles of Marketing LEVEL II SEMESTER IV CODE elective HOURS 30 CREDITS 10

PREREQUISITES Business Math and Economics UNIT COORDINATOR Dr. Richard Mbewe MBA., Ph.D. TEACHING METHOD 70% lectures with presentations and 30% case analysis ASSESSMENT Midterm exam – 25%, final exam – 75% AIMS The course is designed to acquaint the student with the principles and problems of the marketing of goods & services and the methods of distribution from producer or manufacturer to the consumer. The course includes a study of the types, functions, and practices of wholesalers and retailers in the international marketing system and of efficient marketing techniques in the development and expansion on local and foreign markets. CONTENT Marketing is a key ingredient in meeting the global challenges of organizations worldwide. Marketing should not be confused with advertising and sales. In this course you will discover the true nature of marketing and why advertising & sales are merely ingredients of the marketing mix. Additional aspects of marketing will be introduced. These aspects include:            Marketing strategy Market planning Distribution Retailing and Wholesaling International Marketing Target Marketing Market Segmentation Pricing Sales Promotion Services Marketing Industrial Marketing

LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this module a student should be able to:  Understand and analyze market systems  Design and implement market plans  Form rational judgements on contemporary marketing issues and solve basic problems related to marketing and thr route the product takes from factory to consumer. TEXTBOOK Principles of Marketing, 2nd European edition. Phillip Kotler et al. Printice Hall, 1999. Principles of Marketing, Philip Kottler, Prentice Hall, 2006

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The World Economy – Retrospective View LEVEL II PREREQUISITES Intellectual curiosity UNIT COORDINATOR Dr. Rafał Matera TEACHING METHOD 30 hours, 80% lectures, 20% discussion ASSESSMENT Final examination 60%, course works 40% AIMS To present students the development of the world economy from ancient times till the beginning of 21st century. To search long-term tendencies in the factors of development. To encourage students to study historical material associated with economical matters. To support critical and analytical approach to history of economic thought. The accent is put on shaping the world population, income, international trade and global processes. CONTENT 7. Defining the world economy. 8. Long-distance trade and scale of production in ancient times and in the middle ages. 9. Raising the world market. 1500-1800 10. The origin of the world economy. 1800-1914 11. Disintegration of the international labour division. 1914-1939 12. The evolution of the world economy as a result of the WWII. 1939-1947 13. The world economy at the beginning of the “cold war”. 1947-1956 14. The world market at the time of “golden age” of capitalism. 1956-1970 15. The changes in the world economy in the 70s and the 80s of the 20th century 16. New economic deal in the 90s of the 20th century LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this module a student should be able to:  Define, and analyse main factors of development of the world economy  Notice the evolution of the development and strong links between epochs  Understand mutual influences of the states, regions and continents  Differentiate many aspects of globalization and internationalization of production  Have a distance to current changes, crisis’s and threats in the world economy TEXTBOOK R. Cameron, L. Neal, A Concise Economic History of the World: From Palaeolithic Times to the Present, 4th edition, New York-Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. RECCOMMENDED READING BOOKS: Aldcroft, D. The European economy 1914-1990, 3rd edition, London: Routledge, 1993. Ashworth W., A Short History of the International Economy since 1850, London 1977. Foreman-Peck J., A History of the World Economy. International Economic Relations since 1850, London 1983. Maddison A., The World Economy: A Millennial Perspective, OECD, Paris 2002. North D., Thomas R.P., The Rise of the Western World. A New Economic History, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1973. ARTICLES: 67
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SEMESTER IV

CODE elective

HOURS 30

CREDITS 10

Skodlarski J., Matera R., Development Tendencies in the World Economy. A Historical Approach, „International Studies. Interdisciplinary Political and Cultural Journal”, 2005, no. 1, pp. 5-21. Skodlarski J., Matera R., Inflation and Unemployment as the Significant Barriers in the World Economy – General Trends, [in:] Emerging Markets: Social, Political, and Economic Challenges, ed. S. Rudolf, Lodz 2004, vol. 1, pp. 19-30. Skodlarski J., Matera R., The Rise of the World Economy. The Origins of Globalization, [in:] Globalization, Connections and Diversity, Lisbon 2002, vol. 2, pp. 379-391. Skodlarski J., Matera R., The World Economy at the Start of the Third Millennium, ”The Polish Quarterly of International Affairs”, 2003, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 5-36.

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Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

The Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME) Sector LEVEL II UNIT COORDINATOR Dr. Andrzej Kondratowicz, Associate Professor COURSE DELIVERY 30 hours, of which: - lectures: 12 hours; - discussion of assigned material: 6 hours; - presentations of student-prepared projects and their discussion: 12 hours ASSESSMENT 40% = Evaluation of the student’s in-class presentation of the assigned reading material 40% = A Project and its presentation (multi-media strongly preferred) 20% = Overall in-class performance There will be no mid-term or final examination, but short quizzes checking student’s preparedness may be administered (they would count toward overall in-class performance evaluation = 20%). The possible subjects and format of the Project/Presentation are given below, see under Content. BRIEF DESCRIPTION The place and role of SMEs in the economy will be presented. In particular, the SME sector growth and development will be analyzed (theoretically and in practice, in selected countries – but generally in market economies, both mature and under economic transformation; likely examples may be European countries and the US). The analysis will be conducted from an economist’s (mostly macroeconomist’s) rather than manager’s point of view. Participants will get familiar with the following topics: identification and classification of SMEs; specific characteristics and the role of the SME sub-sectors; sources of data on SMEs, numerical characteristics of the SME sector in selected countries; internal and external factors of development of the SMEs – in theory and in practice (in selected countries); firm demography and cohort analysis in particular as a basic tool of dynamic analysis of the enterprises and its application to research done on firms; the role of SMEs in systemic transformation on Polish economy – yesterday, today and tomorrow; barriers to SMEs development. In addition, some basic methodological issues concerning research on SMEs will be raised. AIMS The overall aim of the course is to provide students with understanding of the role the SME sector plays in any national economy – both in terms of static and dynamic analysis. The secondary, although very important aim is to discuss some basic analytical tools necessary to assess the SME sector’s role. Tertiary aim is to make students aware of the existing data sources regarding SMEs. In order to fulfil the above aims a number of specific issues will be discussed: the SME definition – its theoretical and practical aspects (including historical and international differences and its influence on SME data collection and research; homo- vs. heterogeneity of the so-called SME sector; sources of SME statistical data and their quality assessment; analysis of the existing statistical data – cross sectional and longitudinal – selected examples; enterprise demography including basics of cohort analysis; government policy toward SMEs, financial constraints of the SMEs development. It is important to note that this course does NOT aim at analyzing any microeconomic issues and in particular does not analyze (micro) management problems in a small or medium sized firm. CONTENT [attention: text in brackets refers to the required or additional reading; also, to the particular chapters in D. 69
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

SEMESTER IV

CODE elective

HOURS 30

CREDITS 10

Storey textbook] 1. 2. SME definitions (UE, US, other) – based on one criterion or multiple criteria; in theory and in practice Question: a stylized SME – does it exist in reality? [Storey ch.1 & 2; lecture] Decomposition of the SME sector into micro-, small, and medium enterprises; what follows from this division Proposition: dynamics of the above sub-sectors and not of the whole sector is the key Proposition: transition from a given subsector to a higher one is of utmost importance Proposition: distribution of the firm dynamics by industries/branches is of high importance (traditional, modern, hi-tech, etc) [lecture] Short numerical characteristics of the SME sector in selected countries Data sources (National Statistical Offices, SME quasi-governmental institutions; questionnaire-based surveys, other ) Basic statistical data on SMEs in selected countries (static picture for today and historical time series; possibly some international comparisons, as well) [André van Stel; Manfred Schmiemann] Internal and external SME growth factors (theoretically and in reality of the past ten odd years) Internal factors – sector’s potential External factors – institutional environment and economic policies Hypothesis: the dynamics of the sector (and of the subsectors) is determined by the interplay of internal and external factors [Storey ch.3, 4 & 5; lecture] Basic analysis of the SME sector dynamics: firms’ demographics / cohort analysis of the number of firms, of employment and of the value added. „Natural” process of SME sector maturing vs. external factors influence (institutions, economic policy, economic freedom) [Storey ch.3, 4 & 5; lecture] What role may SMEs (and their particular sub-groups) play in economic development of a particular country (fighting unemployment, creating households’ income, dynamizing the economy, stimulating technological progress, laying conditions for development of larger firms – via indigenous growth, mergers, acquisitions) [Storey ch.5 & 6; lecture] SMEs and systemic transition (in Eastern Europe and elsewhere). Particular characteristics of an unstable, adolescent environment with large churning. [lecture] What barriers are the most significant obstacles to economic growth of the SMEs in your country and how can they be removed? Who can remove them? [lecture] Potential and actual role of the financial sector in removing those stumbling blocks [Storey, ch.7]

3.

4.

5.

6.

7. 8. 9.

10. Should SMEs be helped by the government? [Storey, ch.8; lecture]

11. Presentations by students. Students should suggest their topics to the professor within the first 6 weeks of the course. Final topics for essays/in-class presentations will be determined by the professor on the basis of student’s suggestions. Topics may deal with any of the issues enumerated above (1- 10) in relation to a chosen country, region, branch of activity, etc.

Additional comments:   Previous knowledge of Microeconomics I and Macroeconomics I is a prerequisite. Participation in class requires working command of English

LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the course students will: 70
Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics

     



Know the definition of the SME and its significance Be able to identify the strong and weak sides of the multiple-criteria definitions Have knowledge of overall place of the SME sector in the national economy – in terms of the numbers of firms (and establishments), their contribution to national employment and value added. Have the knowledge of basic enterprise demography concepts, including the cohort analysis – in terms of theory and actual numbers evaluation. Will be able to identify the basic stumbling blocks in the SME development. Will have the appreciation of the various consequences of the governmental policies toward SMEs – including a critical assessment of the so-called aid to the SME sector (general equilibrium approach vs. Partial equilibrium approach) Will be able to identify a number of good data sources on SMEs and relevant research institutions

TEXTBOOKS Required readings:  David J. Storey, Understanding the Small Business Sector, Thomson Learning, London [last printing: 2005; you may use previous printings, as well] - ISBN-13: 9781861523815 or ISBN: 1861523815  Jan Winiecki, Vladimir Benacek and Mihaly Laki, The Private Sector After Communism. New entrepreneurial firms in transition economies, Routledge, London & New York 2004, [Part I: Chapters 1 & 2] - ISBN: 0-415-31807-6 Additional readings: [attention: first four below are available free of charge on the web]  André van Stel, COMPENDIA 2000.2: a harmonized data set of business ownership rates in 23 OECD countries, Research Report H200302, SCALES, Zoetermeer, 2003 Manfred Schmiemann, Enterprises in Europe - does size matter?, Statistics in Focus: Industry, Trade and Services, „Theme”: 4:39 (2002) The Small Business Economy. A Report to the President, USGPO, Washington DC 2004 2004 White Paper on Small and Medium Enterprises in Japan. The Limitless Potential of the Diversity of Small and Medium Enterprises, Japan Small Business Research Institute (JSBRI), Tokyo 2004 Per Davidsson, Researching Entrepreneurship, International Studies in Entrepreneurship Series, Springer, 2005, ISBN: 0387228381 and ISBN-13(EAN): 9780387228389 The remaining part of Jan Winiecki et al (2004) –cf above.



 





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Economics of Telecommunication LEVEL II COORDINATOR Łukasz Konopielko, PhD COURSE DELIVERY 30 hours (introductory lectures: up to 10 hours; students’ presentations and discussion 16 hours, field visits – subject to confirmation: 4 hours). ASSESSMENT The final grade will be based on:  Active participation in course – presentations and discussion (20 % of the final grade)  Written assignment (30 % of the final grade)  Final exam (50% of the final grade) BRIEF DESCRIPTION Telecommunication industry and branches connected with it (such as e-business) constitute the area of a great business opportunity, as well as remains one of the best paying employers (at least in Poland), also within its economic departments. This course will analyze the economics of telecommunications and related services, including cable television. We will study the evolution of the telecommunications industry, the economic and public policy issues related to the telecommunications industry from a historical, present and future perspective. The economics of monopoly and oligopoly concepts as applied to network industries and, in particular, to telecommunications markets will be discussed. We will apply this approach to the analysis of traditional telecommunications markets, such as voice services, as well as to "new" telecommunications markets including mobiles; internet and digital tv. Mergers and consolidation issues in the industry will be considered and predictions for the direction of industry change will be made. In addition, students will gain a better understanding of the managerial decision-making that takes place in the industry. Although the course's focus is on the telecommunications industry, much of the economic analysis is applicable to other industries as well. First part of the course will be devoted to building theoretical background of the industry, while later we will focus on more practical issues such as business cases for specific services, analysis of particular operators or current developments in telecommunication. The course will have an emphasis on actual case studies. Field visits (large operator or/and office of UKE – Polish telecom regulator) are envisaged, subject to availability. CONTENT  What is telecommunications? The big picture - Market Structure: users (residential, business), services (voice, data, internet, tv related services), other markets (intermediate markets, equipment)  A bit of technique – How does it all work? Radio vs. cable access, data transmissions protocols, voice techniques. PSTN, VoIP, GSM, femtocells, IPTV, MPLS, triple play.  Review of economic theories related to telecoms – Perfect competition/Monoply/price discrimination, economics of networks.  Antitrust, regulation and privatization  How to read financial statements of a telecommunication company? – case studies.  Business case and its role in preparation of telecommunication investment  Mergers and acquisitions – rationale, methods and performance of consolidated business.  Intercarrier compensation and interoperator relations  Mobile and radio – all in one in the near future?  Internet, next generation network, e-business and key issues in the economics of information. LEARNING OUTCOMES By the end of the course students will be able to:  Understand and analyze key phenomenon related to telecommunication industry.  Perform tasks typical for an economist employed by the telecommunication company.  Understand and explain impact of telecommunication advances on states, societies and economies as well as understand and explain connections between technical and business developments in the industry. 72
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Understand role of state and non-state actors (e.g. operators associations) in regulating and managing telecommunication industry. Develop judgments on all above.

READING Economides, N: The Economics of Networks, International Journal of Industrial Organization, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 673-699, 1996. Konopielko Ł., Wytrębowicz J.: “Provision of teleinformatic services by infrastructure enterprise”. In: J. T. Duda (Ed.), Information Technologies in Economics and Innovative Management, AGH University of Science and Technology Press, Cracow, 2007, pp. 18–24. Nuechterlein J. and Weiser P., Digital Crossroads: American Telecommunications Policy in the Internet Age, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2005. Shapiro, Carl and Hal R. Varian, The Information Economy, Boston: Harvard Business School Press. 1999.

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Demography and Economics of Contemporary European Migration LEVEL II SEMESTER IV CODE elective HOURS 30 CREDITS 10

UNIT COORDINATOR Prof. dr hab. Krystyna Iglicka TEACHING METHOD 15 hours (lectures combined with case studies prepared, discussed and presented by students) ASSESMENT Students’ presentations – 50%, 50% final exam. Students’ active class participation. AIM The aim of this course is to learn basic concepts of population mobility. Social and political consequences of migration are also revolved. he course aims to deepen students’ understanding of contemporary population processes. The time scope is from the 1960s till now but wider historical background will also be considered. CONTENT Major topics to be discussed include:  validity of various migration theories, in particular those referring to the concepts of dual labour market, new economics of labour, transnational social capital and cumulative causation;  replacement migration  regional and sub-regional patterns of migration;  impact of European integration; impact of the rise and decline of communism; impact of globalisation; prospects in view of the European Union enlargement;  migration as legal and illegal business;  migrants’ selectivity; the issue of migration pressure on Europe; policies of immigration and migrants’ integration. LEARNING OUTCOMES The course gives students an opportunity to examine different social and economic theories of migration and test how they fit to patterns of migration and policies that influence and shape some migratory behaviors. TEXTBOOKS: Castles S. and M. Miller, The Age of Migration,2002. Massey, Arango, Kouaouci, Pellegrino, Taylor, Worlds in Motion – Understanding International Migration at the End of the Millennium,1998. OECD, Globalisation, Migration and Development,2000. RECOMMENDED READING: Taylor, Massey, International Migration – Prospects and Policies (2003) UN, Recommendations on Statistics of International Migration (1998)

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Personal Finance in Practice (with Excel) LEVEL II PREREQUISITES Introduction to Finance, UNIT COORDINATOR Katarzyna Kopczewska, Ph. D. TEACHING METHOD 30 hours, 35% lectures, 65% lab ASSESSMENT Active class participation (10%), 2 quizzes (in total 30%, 15% each), final exam in lab (1.5 hours) (60%) AIMS Course is designed to present practical aspects of personal finance management: deposits, loans and stock exchange investments. Basic tool for solving financial problem will be MS Excel. Students will get familiar with current situation on the financial and banking market and will be able to conduct comparative analyses for most of household financial potential decisions. CONTENT  Personal finance – important issues, fields of interest: deposit, loans, tax on capital gains, stock exchange investment, interest rates: nominal, effective, real, APR  Banking market of deposits and loans – comparative analysis, history and forecasts  Deposits, annuity – problems of compounding, when to pay a tax, what monthly payment will guarantee € 1 mln when retired (PV(), FV(), EFFECTIVE(), NOMINAL() )  Loans – payment simulation, capital-interest decomposition, Annual Percentage Rate, “cheap loans” in supermarket, flat rate (PMT(), PPMT(), IPMT(), NPER() )  Stock exchange and investment founds – risk and profitability, how to compare products  Returns on assets – statistical analysis of returns and stock exchange performance, market beta LEARNING OUTCOMES Students will be able to run financial analysis to make financial decisions. They will understand financial mechanisms, get familiar with sources of financial data. TEXTBOOKS Day A., Mastering Financial Mathematics in Microsoft Excel: A Practical Guide for Business Calculations, FT Press SEMESTER IV CODE elective HOURS 30 CREDITS 10

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Contemporary China - Genesis and Background of Chinese “Economic Miracle" LEVEL II PREREQUISITES None UNIT COORDINATOR Dr. Jaroslaw Jura TEACHING METHOD 30 hours, 70% lectures, 30% discussion (based on recommended readings) ASSESSMENT Final exam (2 hours) 50%, midterm exam 30%, 2 quizzes 20% (10% each) AIMS The main aim of the course is to provide the students with knowledge, which should help them to understand genesis of Chinese “economic miracle” and growing political importance of Peoples Republic of China nowadays. CONTENT 1. China today - most important characteristics of contemporary China (physical geography, administrative division, population, natural resources, industry and agriculture, urbanization, etc.) 2. Milestones in Chinese modern history (from XIX century till today): Opium wars, Taiping and “Boxer” revolts, fall of the empire, China Communist Party and domestic war, establishing of Peoples Republic of China, “Long Leap Forward”, Cultural Revolution, Deng’s reform, etc. 3. Chinese traditional philosophy and its influence on Chinese mentality 4 China contemporary political system. 5. International relations of Peoples Republic of China – history and state of play. 6. Confutianists heritage and contemporary China – “face”, “guanxi”, social hierarchy etc., and its importance in Chinese social and business life. 7/8 Economic reforms – genesis, way of introduction and outcomes: agrarian reform, special economic zones, industrialization, privatization, reconstruction of “work units”, etc. 9/10 China and international economic system. Chinese economic expansion in the world (South East Asia, Latin America and Africa) 11. Social repercussion of economic reforms: migration, unemployment, social insecurity, society polarization 12. Social changes in contemporary China and its economic consequences: individualization, globalization, consumption and consumerism, etc. LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this module students should be able to:  recognize the milestones of Chinese history and its relations to the situation today  describe most important Chinese traditional values and its relations to the contemporary Chinese reality  understand the genesis and background of Chinese economic boom  posses some knowledge of contemporary China international relations and international economic exchange  describe how the economic changes have influenced social transformation and vice versa Textbooks: Hunter Alan, Sexton Jay, 1999, Contemporary China, Palgrave Macmillan pp. recommended 45-64, 99 – 149, 176 – 200, the whole book useful Morton W Scott, Levis Charlton, 2004, China Its History and Culture, McGraw-Hill (Ebrary) Naughton Barry, 2007, The Chinese Economy: Transitions and Growth, The MIT Press. SEMESTER IV CODE elective HOURS 30 CREDITS 10

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Negotiations and Communication LEVEL II PREREQUISITES Introduction to Sociology UNIT COORDINATOR Dr. Jarosław Jura COURSE DELIVERY 30 hours, 60% lectures, 40% problem sets and discussion ASSESSMENT 50% negotiation analyses – group project, 30% negotiation simulation performance, two short written assignment 20% (10% each) COURSE DESCRIPTION AND AIMS The aim of the course is to provide the students with knowledge concerning interpersonal communication characteristic and rules. On basis of such theoretical framework students shall be able to understand and analyse process of interpersonal communication in everyday life. Furthermore basic knowledge on negotiations (types, ways of conducting, various factors influencing success of that process) and some set of negotiation tools will be presented. It is worth mentioning that emphasis will be put on the contextual, not universal, employment of particular negotiation approaches and strategies. CONTENT  Communication 1. Introduction to interpersonal communication: - sign, symbol, signal etc. – the most important concepts of semiotics. 2. Verbal and nonverbal communication. 3/4. Discourse analyze.  Negotiations 5. Negotiation as a particular kind of strategic communication. 6. Types of negotiations. 7. Business negotiations as particular type of negotiations 8. Job interview as a example of strategic negotiations 9. Negotiations in the multicultural environment. 10-12 Negotiation simulation and analyze LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this module a student should be able to:       understand meaning and role of most important concepts of semiotics - sign, symbol, signal etc. understand social dependence and contextuality of communication situations describe potentially preferable context (environment) for particular negotiation situation choose potentially most effective negotiation tool in particular situation analyze negotiation situation and understand interaction process adapt acquired knowledge to multicultural context SEMESTER IV CODE elective HOURS 30 CREDITS 10

TEXTBOOK 14. S. Trenholm, A. Jensen, Interpersonal Communication, Oxford University Press, 2004 15. Howard Raiffa, The Art and Science of Negotiation. Harvard University Press, 1982 77
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16. D. W. Hendon, R. A. Hendon, P. Herbig, Cross-Cultural Business Negotiations., Quorum Books, 1996. READINGS: 10. Basso, Keith H., 1990, "To Give up on Words": Silence in Western Apache Culture” in: Donal Carbaugh, Cultural Communication and Intercultural Contact., Lawrence Erlbaum 11. Gumperz, J. 1992, “Interviewing in Intercultural Situations” in: Drew, P. & Heritage, J. Talk at Work: Interaction in Institutional Setting, Cambridge University Press. 12. Hammer, M.R. & Rogan, R.G., 1997, “Negotiation models in crisis situations: The value of a communication based approach.” in: R.G. Rogan, M.R. Hammer, & C.R. Van Zandt (eds.). Dynamic processes of crisis negotiations: Theory, research and practice (pp. 9-23). Westport, CT: Praeger Press. 13. Labov, William, 1972, Language in the Inner City: Studies in the Black English Vernacular, University of Pennsylvania Press., pp: 297-353 14. McCreary Don R., 1986, Japanese-U.S. Business Negotiations: A Cross-Cultural Study. Praeger Publishers, pp: 24 – 75

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Tax Policy LEVEL II SEMESTER IV CODE elective HOURS 30 CREDITS 10

PREREQUISITES Basic microeconomics and macroeconomics UNIT COORDINATOR Dr. Jarek Neneman LEARNING APPROACH 30 hours, 50% lectures, 30% problem sets, 10% students’ presentations ASSESMENT Student performance on short test, presentations and final exam (1.5 hours) will constitute the basis for the final grade. Grading: tests (20 %), presentations (20%) and final exam (60%). AIMS Present introduction to tax theory and reality. Discuss current policy issues CONTENT  Taxation and income distribution  Taxation and efficiency  Efficient and equitable taxation  Taxation and behaviour  Income taxes  VAT  Excise duty  Other taxes  Tax harmonization and competition LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this course a student should be able to:  Understand basic principles of tax theory  Name and discuss basic taxes  Follow current tax discussion TEXTBOOKS H. Rosen, T. Gayer, Public Finance, 8 th ed., Mc Graw, Hill, 2008 J. Simon, Ch. Nobes, The economics of taxation, Prentice Hall, 1992 B. Salanie, The economics of taxation, The MIT Press, 2003

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Energy Security and Climate Protection in the European Union LEVEL II PREREQUISITES None UNIT COORDINATOR Piotr Woźniak, M.Sc. TEACHING METHOD 15 hours : 80% lectures, 20% problem sets. ASSESSMENT Final written exam (60%), assigned homework (2 x 10% = 20%), 4 quizzes: (4 x 5% = 20%). AIMS To provide students with knowledge of the EU legislation on energy and climate change. The course concentrates on acquis communautaire, especially on regulations, directives and decisions, dealing with energy markets, energy security and climate protection. The course covers also basic commitments of the EU and the EU Member States under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and its Kyoto Protocol. Energy crisis management is introduced following the procedures of the International Energy Agency (IEA). CONTENT 1. Basic definitions of energy and energy markets. 2. Current UE legislation on energy (natural gas, electricity). 3. Energy Charter Treaty and Kyoto Protocol interactions with the EU legislation. 4. Energy security and energy crisis management; the EU rules, the IEA mechanisms and procedures. 5. Legislation and policy for climate protection. 6. Advantages and disadvantages of the EU approach to climate protection. LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this module students shall become familiar with the EU legislation on energy and on the energy policy objectives. The course allows students to assess and understand the impact of energy regulations on competitiveness of the regional and national economies in the EU. RECOMMENDED READINGS*1: Directive 2003/55/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2003 concerning common rules for the internal market in natural gas and repealing Directive 98/30/EC; OJ L 176/57 Directive 2003/54/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2003 concerning common rules for the internal market in electricity and repealing Directive 96/92/EC; OJ L 176/37 Council Directive 2004/67/EC of 26 April 2004 concerning measures to safeguard security of natural gas supply; OJ L 127/92 Council Directive 2006/67/EC of 24 July 2006 imposing an obligation on Member States to maintain minimum stocks of crude oil and/or petroleum products (Codified version); OJ L 217/8 White Paper: An Energy Policy for the European Union COM(95) 682 final An Energy Policy for Europe COM(2007) 1 final Limiting Global Climate Change to 2 degrees Celsius - The way ahead for 2020 and beyond COM(2007) 2 final Directive 2003/87/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 October 2003 establishing a scheme for greenhouse gas emission allowance trading within the Community and amending Council Directive 96/61/EC; OJ L 275/32 Proces decyzyjny w Unii Europejskiej; UKIE, Warszawa, 2005 RELEVANT INTERNET SOURCES:
1

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* Please note, that the EU legal documents on energy and climate are subject to frequent amending and/or repealing and replacing with other equivalent pieces of legislation; in case of any change students shall be informed about as soon as amendments or new documents are officially published by the Commission 80
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www.ec.europa.eu/index_en.htm www.encharter.org www.iea.org www.unfccc.int

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Risk Management LEVEL II CO-ORDINATOR mgr Arun D’Souza M.Com COURSE DELIVERY 30 hours (lectures). ASSESSMENT Midterm (40%) Project (20%) Finals (40%) BRIEF DESCRIPTION The aim of the course, is to act as a practical guide for managing all types of business risk, that can destabilise companies. All manner of business risk ‘icebergs’ from gyrating currencies to product recalls to environmental mishaps – can destabilise companies. To avoid costly surprises, risk management system to become an integrated part of an operational development projects of both public and private sectors. The presentation of real case studies can provide the opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to the real world situation and the risk management tools can provide light on the identification, analysis of the source of risks, evaluating the impact of the risks and planning of treatment of the risks identified. A general guideline for implementation of an efficient risk management system will guide students through with the mapping of major business risk exposure; supported by practical tips how to monitor and manage business risks on time. In conclusion, risk management method tailored to the company needs will ensure that risks are identified and handled, increase the possibility for project success and bring in reduction in the average cost related to projects. Despite of all recorded benefits, there are risks associated with risk management. CONTENT 1 Introduction: Current economic & market situation - what impact has global recession on business? - the biggest risk faced during financial crisis? - why is risk management necessary? why risk management to become an integral part of strategic planning? 2 Risk management principles and concepts 2.1 Demonstrating good governance practice for small business 2.2 Defining risk and risk management 2.3 Types & Categories of risk and why manage risk and what are limitations of risk management ? 3 Mapping of risk exposure 3.1 Financial risks, business risks, other external risks 3.2 Wheel of integration - risk management system integrated with different business applications and processes 4 The case of a chief risk officer 4.1 Why risk officer? – 5 critical areas, key role of risk officer 4.2 Agenda – first days of risk officer at work 5 The risk management process 5.1 What is the risk management (RM) process? 5.2 Step 1. Communicate and consult 5.3 Step 2. Establish the context 5.4 Step 3. Identify the risk 5.5 Step 4. Analyze the source of risk 5.6 Step 5. Evaluate the risk 5.7 Step 6. Treat the risk 82
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CREDITS 10

5.8 Step 7. Monitor and review 5.9 Summary of risk management steps & RM framework 6 Risk management tools and activities reporting 6.1 Research techniques - desk research, field research, focus group 6.2 Short term decisions - Pricing strategies, relevant costing on material, labor, overheads - Make or buy decision, shut down decision - Improvement in the sources of working capital, ratio analysis 6.3 Risk modeling tools and techniques - probability, expected values with pay off tables - risk attitude - maximax, maximin, minimax regret rule - limiting factors (one and multiple), linear regression, high and low methods, average growth method - simulation & sensitivity analysis 7. 7.1 7.2 7.3 Risk management case studies and analysis 10 magic rules as guideline to implement risk management A basic disaster 10 point core plan Practical implementation of risk management system in a : - Business services industry - Food industry 7.4 Conclusion LEARNING OUTCOMES AND COMPETENCES: a) Knowledge and Understanding On successful completion of this course, the students will: - have a clear understanding, that in a company, only thoroughness, diligence and transparency are to be the guiding principles for the risk management activities. - know how to identify & manage business risks, even those which are veiled behind statistical models or blindly hedged with complex financial instruments or well hidden in balance sheet. - be able to complete an accurate mapping of business risk exposure effectively. - understand the importance of due diligence exercise before merging & acquiring of any new company. b) Specific skills acquired On successful completion of this course, student will be able to: - implement an efficient risk management system including of risk analysis and control, training and continual improvement in any company. - master over short term decision making in the areas of: pricing strategy; make vs buy; working capital techniques. - prepare accurate forecast with reference to all possible or most probable risks or uncertainties of business. - acquire the skills and competency of a chief risk officer. - learn the art of proactive monitoring of business risks; and make a right and on time decision- whether to acquire or merge new company or not? - c) Personal transferable skills On successful completion of this course, students will be able to show: - the ability to demonstrate team-work in identifying, analyzing, managing and planning of the business risks. - critical thinking. - maturity in decision-making. READING REFERENCES: 1. Carroll, Terry, and Mark Webb. The Risk Factor: How to Make Risk Management Work for You in Strategic Planning and Enterprise. Harrogate, UK: Take That Books, 2001. 2. Bernstein, Peter L. Against the Gods, The Remarkable Story of Risk. New York: Wiley, 1996. 3. Peter Howson, Gower Publication Ltd, (2003), ‘Due Diligence – the critical stage in Acquisition and Merger’. 4. Schroeder, PW, Copenhagen Business School Press, (2006)‘Impediment to effective Risk Management, in perspective on Strategic Risk’. Chapter 4. 5. Denzel Rankin & Peter Howson, Pearson Education Limited, Great Britain, (2006), ‘Acquisition Essentials – a 83
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step by step guide to smarter M&A Deals’ 6. Knight, R. & Pretty, D., Oxford (1997) ‘The Impact of Catastrophes on Shareholder Value’ . 7. Booz, Allen, Hamilton, (2004), Redefining the Corporate Governance Agenda: From Risk Management to Enterprise Resilience.

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Introduction to Intercultural Management LEVEL II SEMESTER IV CODE elective HOURS 30 CREDITS 10

CODE PREREQUISITES none UNIT COORDINATOR Dr. Anna Wasiela TEACHING METHOD 30 hours, each topic is discussed in lecture/seminar and practiced in activity workshop: pair and group work, case study analysis, simulated meeting, role-play, presentation. ASSESSMENT Mid-term case study assignment in groups - 20%; group project including a presentation – 30%, end-term close book examination (1,5 hours) - 50 % COURSE DESCRIPTION AND AIMS The course is designed to develop the ability to:   work and communicate well in an intercultural environment deal with ex-patriates and cultural minorities in a workplace

Additionally we will work on presentation skills and learn about culturally specific types of presentations. CONTENT   Culture and factors influencing it Intercultural awareness - Bennett's Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity and Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI - for measuring cross-cultural competence and training needs, in both individuals and groups) Declarative knowledge vs. procedural knowledge and its importance in intercultural relations Globalization – what constitutes a multinational enterprise (MNE)? Cultural biases and how they relate to collectivism and individualism vs. context dependency Managing minorities - discussing whether they should be unified with the other employees as a parallel to a globalizing company, or if their national specificity should be preserved Models to explain “national culture” – theory & practice o Cultural value orientations by Schwartz o Culture dimensions by Hofstede o Culture dimensions by Hampden Turner and Trompenars Asians and Westerners thinking code Who is an ex-patriate and how to manage ex-patriate programs in MNE’s Direct vs. indirect communication style as an example of a cross cultural communication clash Presentation styles in different countries

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The module develops knowledge on the basis for intercultural differences and its importance in management of people within multinational organizations. On completion of this module students should have knowledge and understanding of the intercultural management subject, specifically of management of ex-patriates and cultural minorities. Students should also learn how to make a proper presentation in a culturally diverse workplace. TEXTBOOK 1. 2. 3. 4. Matsumoto, D. & Juang, L. P. (2007). Culture and psychology. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Nisbett, R. E. (2003). The Geography of Thought: How Asians and Westerners Think Differently - and Why. Free Press Schwartz, S. H. (2006). As transnational education programmes continue to proliferate, A Theory of Cultural Value Orientations: Explication and Applications. Comparative Sociology, 5/ 2-3, 138-180 Hofstede, G. (1996). Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind. New York: McGraw-Hill

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Accounting in Financial Institutions LEVEL II SEMESTER IV CODE elective HOURS 30 CREDITS 10

PREREQUISITES Accounting, Banking and Finance DISCUSSIONS COORDINATOR Agata A. Kocia, Ph.D., M.B.A. ASSESMENT Class participation 20% Short Examinations/Quizzes 30% Research project 50% AIMS The main focus of the class content will be on banks, although other financial institutions will be mentioned as well. The students will be introduced to basic accounting concepts used in financial institutions. They will also become familiar with procedures and accounting documents used at financial institutions. The aim is to prepare the students to seek out employment in the banking sector. CONTENT  Accounting in financial institutions – the objectives  Legal basis for accounting in financial institutions  General accounting principles according to Polish law, International Accounting Standards, and American Accounting Standards  Valuation of financial institutions’ assets and liabilities according to Polish law, International Accounting Standards, and American Accounting Standards  Reporting in financial institutions  Financial statement analysis of financial institutions LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this course a student should be able to:  Understand the accounting processes in financial institutions according to Polish law, International Accounting Standards, and American Accounting Standards  Be able to perform financial statement analysis of a chosen financial institution TEXTBOOKS - Edwards, J.D., Principles of Bank Accounting and Reporting, American Bankers Association, 1991 - Miętki, Zygmunt, Rachunkowość bankowa, Wydawnictwo Wyższej Szkoły Bankowej, 2008 - Wędzki, Dariusz, Analiza wskaźnikowa sprawozdania finansowego, Wolters Kluwer: Oficyna Ekonomiczna, 2006 - Articles provided by the lecturer

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Introduction to Innovation Economics LEVEL II SEMESTER IV CODE elective HOURS 30 CREDITS 10

Prerequisites Introductory Microeconomics, Introductory Macroeconomics Unit Coordinator Krzysztof Szczygielski Teaching Method 30 hours: Lecture (70%), Workshops (30%) Assessment Final exam (60%), Homework (40%), Aims Innovation is one of the most popular notions in the contemporary economic and political discourse, and innovation studies are a rapidly developing social-science-discipline. The aim of this course is to give students a good introduction to a variety of innovation-related issues both in economics and business studies. There are two main modules of the course, one adopting a predominantly micro-, and another a more macro-perspective. Both modules will combine some elements of theory with practical examples and analysis of data from industries and economies. Content Introduction 8. 9.

The Concept of Innovation, Types of Innovations, Innovations and Technological Progress Innovations in Economics and Business Studies

The Innovative Firm 10. Why Firms Innovate 11. Networks of Innovators 12. Knowledge Management 13. Innovation Process and Innovation Strategies 14. Innovation and Firm Performance 15. Innovation in High- and Low-Tech Industries Knowledge-Based Economy 16. The Role of Knowledge in Modern Societies and Economies 17. Innovation and Performance of Economies 18. National Innovation Systems in Europe and in the U.S. 19. Science, Technology and Innovation Policy

Learning Outcome Upon completion of this course students will have a fair level of understanding of the particular nature and the importance of knowledge and innovations in the lives of companies, industries and economies. They will have learned about the interaction between economic processes and technological progress and understand related challenges for executives and policy makers. Textbook & Readings “Oslo Manual - Guidelines for Collecting and Interpreting Innovation Data”, 3rd edition, OECD/ European Communities 2005 Fagerberg, J., D.C. Mowery and R.R. Nelson (2005) (Eds.) “The Oxford Handbook of Innovation”, Oxford University Press, New York. 88
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von Hippel, E. (2006) “Democratizing Innovation”. The MIT Press, Cambridge MA., (freely available at http://web.mit.edu/evhippel/www/democ1.htm) Research Policy, Structural Change and Economic Dynamics – various issues

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The Monetary and Credit System in the Light of the Global Financial Crisis LEVEL II SEMESTER IV CODE elective HOURS 30 CREDITS 10

Prerequisites Introductory Microeconomics and Macroeconomics Unit Coordinator Prof. Karol Lutkowski PhD Teaching Methods Lectures 30 hours Performance Evaluation Mid-term test (40%), written exam (60 %) Objectives The specific aim of this series of lectures consists in an attempt to update students’ familiarity with recent developments in understanding the nature, importance and mode of operation of the credit and monetary system in a modern market economy. In the aftermath of the shock, delivered by the latest international financial crisis to the traditional understanding of the way financial institutions, instruments and markets operated, an entirely new landscape has emerged, forcing a revision of many hitherto unquestioned precepts and practices in this sphere. Thus, a fresh look at the matter in the light of recent experiences became necessary, both in theory and practice. The ongoing revision in both those spheres represents a challenge to the theory of economics. It is reflected, among other areas, in the evolving role of central banking and in the global efforts at changing the regulatory framework of the financial sector, with far reaching consequences for the mechanism of credit and money creation, instruments and aims of monetary policy, basic principles of commercial banking, understanding of the interaction between monetary and fiscal policy as well as operation of the money, capital and foreign exchange markets. Content 1.Monetary and financial framework of the modern economy – mutual linkages and interaction between their component parts 2.Nature and evolution of money, modern forms of money – their origin and specific features 3.Special role, status and functions of the modern central bank – review of the structure of its balance sheet, the mechanism of cash money creation 4.Basic principles of commercial banking – tecent trends in its development 5. Money market – its functions, its participants, types of instruments traded and purposes which they serve 6. Foreign exchange market, rate of exchange and role of the central bank in the market under various exchange rate regimes 7. Evolution of the theoretical underpinning of monetary policy in the past decades 8. Present-day understanding of the aims of monetary policy, instruments and channels of transmission; response of the monetary policy to the latest crisis 9. The structure of public finance, specific tasks of the public finance in the light of modern economic thinking and its interrelationship with the monetary sector 10. Nature and consequences of the growing public debt, its implications for monetary and financial stability of the economy, as illustrated by the present-day European experience 11. Capital market – its economic role and importance, its institutional framework and functioning under the impact of the latest financial crisis 12. Investment banking and institutional investors in the capital market, viewed in the light of the recent developments 13. The global search for an optimal regulatory and supervisory framework 14. Problems of stabilisation of the financial sector in the light of recent experiences 15. Summing up 90
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Learning outcome Enhanced students’ familiarity with the latest trends in central banking, credit and monetary system of the contemporary market economy in the wake of the latest financial crisis

Literature: Howard Davies, David Green – „Banking on the Future – The Rise and Fall of Central Banking” – Princeton University Press, 2010 K. Pilbeam – „Finance and Financial Markets” – Palgrave, 2d ed. However - lectures based partially also upon current scholarly publications available online, indicated by the lecturer.

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Investing in Capital Markets LEVEL II SEMESTER IV CODE elective HOURS 30 CREDITS 10

Prerequisites This is an introductory undergraduate course, the contents are reasonably self-contained and no financial markets background is assumed. Lecturer: Dr. Konrad Leśniak Learning approach 30 hours, 100% lectures (selected video materials used during the lectures) Assessment 2 quizzes (2 x 15%), case study (20%), final written examination (50%) Teaching objective: To acquaint the students with the basic concepts and methods used in capital market investing. Contents:  The investment process,  Security markets and the associated investment transactions,  Historic market bubbles and crashes,  Time value of money,  Investment risk and return,  Equity shares – characteristics, analysis and valuation,  Fixed-income instruments - characteristics, analysis and valuation,  Derivatives,  Managing a portfolio and the investment funds,  Market efficiency and herding,  Technical analysis,  Investment philosophy – investing and speculation/trading, investing styles, some methods used by famous investors. Learning outcomes On completion of the course, the student should be able to: 15. Explain the role played by the capital markets in the economy and identify the principal parties active in these markets, 16. Understand the concept of the time value of money and be able to perform basic compounding and discounting calculations, 17. Appreciate the relationship between investment risk and return, 18. Perform basic analysis of a prospective equity or fixed-income investment, 19. Monitor capital market evolution, 20. Identify the principal investing styles and motivations for their selection. Basic Course Text: L. Gitman, M.D. Joehnk and S.B. Smart “Fundamentals of Investing” (11th edition), Pearson International (2011) Additional reading given during the course.

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TEACHING STAFF

Professor Wojciech Bieńkowski, Ph.D.
Present Academic Position Dean, Business College, Lazarski School of Commerce and Law, Warsaw, Poland; Director, US Economy and International Business Relations Institute, Lazarski School of Commerce and Law; Fellow at the Institute for Applied Economics and the Studies of Business Enterprise, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore Education and Research 1968 Warsaw School of Economics (formerly - Main School of Planning and Statistics in Warsaw, Faculty: Foreign Trade) - M.A. diploma 1978 Ph.D. diploma 1993 D.Sc. diploma 1971 - 1972 University of Rochester, NY, USA; Ph.D. Studies 1984 - 1986 Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., USA; Visiting Scholar 1991 - 1992 Nagoya City University, Japan; Visiting Scholar 02/ - 06/1994 George Mason University, USA; Visiting Scholar Fall 2005 Harvard University-visiting scholar Fall 2006 The Johns Hopkins University-visiting scholar Several short-term research studies in: Germany ( RFE/RL Institute in Munich), Austria, Italy (The Rockefeller Conference and Study Center at Bellagio) and University of Rochester, New York. Publications Author and co-author of dozens of articles and several books published by such publishing houses as PalgraveMacmillan (USA-UK) , Cambridge University Press (UK), M.E. Sharpe (USA), Maruzen (Japan) and PWN, PWE (Poland) and at scientific journals: Harvard International Review, Comparative Economic Studies, Journal of Comparative Economics, Bank of Austria. Business Experience 1993-1995 Director, International Department National Environmental Fund (NFOŚiGW ) 1995-1998 Vice-President, National Environment Fund 1998-1999 Executive Director, European Investment Fund Member of several supervisory boards, including the Environmental Bank and the Polish Agency for Foreign Investment Membership Harvard Alumni Club in Poland (Vice-President) W. Fulbright Scholar Association Salzburg Seminar Alumni Association Foreign Trade Faculty Graduates Association Association of Polish Economists (TEP) Activity: 2006-2007 Adviser to Poland’s Minister of Economy 06/2009 - present Editorial Board Member of“ Eastern European Economics” 1. Scientific research as a Head of the team

- 2010 (till now) 93
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Head of the project: “Przydatność polskich rynków finansowych na niestabilności wewnętrzne i zewnętrzne” (Committee of Economic Research NBP), with budget of 68 500zł - 2007-2009 Head of the project nr N112 008 32/0274, pt: “Zmiana znaczenia czynników międzynarodowej konkurencyjności gospodarczej wynikająca z procesów globalizacji i integracji z Unią Europejską. Wnioski dla optymalizacji modelu polskiej polityki gospodarczej” (Ministry of Science and Higher Education), with budget of 200 000zł.

Arun D’Souza, MA
EDUCATION : Masters in Commerce and Economics, University of Bombay Business Administration & Economics (Accounting, Auditing, Marketing as major) Internal Audit at MIS Institute, London UK. Internal Audit in Business Organisations [IA] Merger & Acquisition [M&A] Fraud Management JOB POSTING / EMPLOYERS : 2008 Financial / Business Controller 2006 Financial Controller / Chief Accountant 2004 Finance Manager 1995 Director of Finance / Business Controller 1994 Financial Controller / Chief Accountant 1992 Financial Controller

– VDC European Division Sales & Marketing – Berlitz International Group – Buraimi Group – AB Volvo Group [Volvo & Renault ] – Land O’lakes Inc. – Foundation for Devel.of Polish Agriculture (FDPA)

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE GAINED : ~ Set up Risk Management platform & conduct Internal Audits….. (in 7 Eastern European countries as follows in Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Latvia, Poland, Yugoslavia, Hungary, Slovakia and Czech Republic, as well as in China, ~ Conducted Financial Audit and established a Purchase Price for the transfer sale deed of the Polish Volvo Car Division to General Motors / Ford USA, ~ SAP project Leader and Start Up of the First Volvo Shared Service Centre Accounting in Poland, ~ Implemented SAP accounting system and A Cross functional Process and Procedures for ensuring Business Operational Excellence, ~ Responsible for Transfer Pricing Project for AB Volvo in Poland, ~ Expertise in the areas of Working Capital Management, Risk Management, Fraud Management and Business Performance Measurement and its Management, ~ Consultancy to Different Business Organizations, as well as Lecturing on Optional Electives to Students in some of the Local Universities in Warsaw. Teaching Topics relating to : - Financial and Managerial Accounting; - Advanced Cost Accounting & Business Planning & Budgeting; - Working Capital Management; - Corporate Finance; - Risk & Uncertainty Management; - Fraud Management; - Ways of Working to ensure Operational Excellence; - Business Performance Management for-Profit & not-for-profit making Organizations.

Dr. Bogna Gawrońska – Nowak
14 years of regular teaching as an academic lecturer, that includes teaching in English and Spanish in Poland and 94
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abroad. Since 2003 working as an academic teacher of Macroeconomics, International Finance, International Economics, and Risk in Financial Markets, on the BA and MSc programmes fully validated by University of Wales. Five times selected by international students as the best teacher of the validates studies in Economics. Academic Tutor of Students’ Organisation at University of Lodz, and of “Young Researchers for Economics” (consisting of research oriented international students) at Lazarski University in Warsaw. Supervisor of MSc thesis many times awarded distinction by the British partners. Teaching experience on MBA Programmes (with a special focus on professionals from banking and financial sector). ACADEMIC POSITIONS Since 2010 Since 2009 2008 – 2010 2007 – 2008 since 2007 2006 - 2007 since 2003 1996 - 2007 Rector's Adviser for Foreign Affairs, Lazarski University in Warsaw Head of Chair of Economics, Department of Economics and Management, Lazarski University in Warsaw Vice Dean for Research and External Affairs, Department of Economics and Management, Lazarski University in Warsaw Associate Dean for Validated Studies in Economics, Department of Economics and Management, Lazarski University in Warsaw Assistant Professor, Department of Economics and Management, Lazarski University in Warsaw Programme Director of BA Studies in Business Economics, validated by University of Wales, Department of Economics and Management, Lazarski University in Warsaw Adjunct, Department of Economics and Management, Lazarski University in Warsaw Assistant Professor, Institute of Economics University of Lodz,

RESEARCH AND FOREIGN SCHOLARSHIPS 2009 – 2011 Main co-ordinator and author of the project on Currency Interventions and Foreign Exchange Market Volatility in Central and Eastern Europe, supported by Polish Ministry of Science and National Bank of Poland since 2006 Expert on Polish budget for Biuro Analiz Sejmowych (Bureau of Analysis of Polish Parliament) 2005 research on Dollarisation, Univerisdad Internacional SEK, Ecuador, Visiting Professor 2004 participation in preparing UNDP Report of Polish Labour Market, Expert since 2003 Centrum Analiz Spoleczno-Ekonomicznych (Center for Social and Economic Research) in Warsaw, Expert 2003 OPEN MINDS, Europe in Global World – blending differences International Conference for Young Academics, Head Co-ordinator 2003 research for The Chancellery of the Prime Minister of Polish Government, Analysis of barriers for women from rural areas and small towns in asserting their legal rights, Researcher 2002 research project organised by the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) and Zentrum fur Europaiche Integrationsforschung (ZEI) at Univeristy of Tartu, Labour Markets, Work, and Welfare During the Transition and Integration Processes, research on: Reshaping Education – Possible Solution to Youth Unemployment in Europe?, co-researchers: J. Grochowalska, P. Kubiak 1998 Universita di Padova, Instituto Marco Fanno, fellowship (Ph.D. studies) 1997 University of Glasgow, Institute of Central and Western European Studies, Dekaban Fellowship 1995 London School of Economics, MSc studies, Batory’s Foundation, fellowship 1994 University of Lodz, Faculty of Economics and Sociology, MA Major: European integration; International trade Minor: Transition Economies 1992 TEMPUS Programme, Erasmus University of Rotterdam, Undergraduate European Studies 1991 TEMPUS Programme, Universidade de Coimbra, Undergraduate European Studies PUBLICATIONS Author and co-author of dozens of articles and 3 books published in Poland (PWE) and abroad (among the foreign publications: working papers of Universita of Padova, UNDP, Inha University (Korea). 95
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Wojciech Grabowski, M.Sc
Assistant Education: M.A. in Quantitative Methods in Economics and Information Technology from Warsaw School of Economics (2005). Ph.D in Economics- Thesis is finished and author is waiting for review. Expected moment of defence- autumn 2011 Research area Cointegration, Limited dependent and qualitative variables models, Currency and financial crises, Financial contagion, Financial econometrics Publications „Skointegrowanie ograniczonych zmiennych losowych”- Przegląd Statystyczny,s. 96-105 Vol. 52, No. 4, 2005 „Skointegrowanie cenzurowanych procesów stochastycznych”- w „Metody Ilościowe w naukach ekonomicznych” s.13-24, Wydawnictwo SGH, Warszawa 2006, „Stationarity Testing and Error Correction Models for Censored Time Series”- in Proceedings of the 32-nd International Conference Macromodels, Wydawnictwo Absolwent, Łódź 2006, "Wpływ niestacjonarności regresorów na estymatory parametrów modeli zmiennych jakościowych"- w „Metody Ilościowe w naukach ekonomicznych” s.32-54, Wydawnictwo SGH, Warszawa 2007, „Integrated Time Series in Binary Choice Models”- in Proceedings of the 33-rd International Conference Macromodels, Wydawnictwo Absolwent, Łódź 2007, "Testowanie stacjonarności w autoregresyjnym modelu Poissona", Studia Prawno-Ekonomiczne, s.141-150, Vol. 76, 2007, "Asymptotics for Integrated Time Series in Binary Choice Models" w: „Metody Ilościowe w naukach ekonomicznych", Wydawnictwo SGH, Warszawa 2008, "Restriction testing in binary choice model with I(1) regressors", Central European Journal of Economic Modelling and Econometrics, s. 301-309, Vol. 1, Issue 4, 2009, "Are Unit Export Values Correct Measures of the Exports' Quality?" (with Krzysztof Szczygielski), CASE Network Studies and Analyses, No. 393/2009, 2009, “Presja kryzysowa na polskim rynku walutowym w latach 1998-2008” (z Bogną Gawrońską-Nowak), w: „Rozważania o rozwoju gospodarczym Polski”, Oficyna Wydawnicza Uczelni Łazarskiego, Warszawa 2009, “Nowa metoda identyfikacji epizodów kryzysowych na rynku walutowym w oparciu o wskaźnik presji rynkowej (EMP)”, Studia Prawno-Ekonomiczne, s.241-259, Vol. 80, 2009, "Qual-VECM Approach to Modeling Cointegrated Systems with I(1) Binary Variables", Proceedings of the 35-th International Conference Macromodels, Wydawnictwo Absolwent, Łódź 2009, "Ekonometria. Zbiór zadań" (with Aleksander Welfe), Polskie Wydawnictwo Ekonomiczne, Warszawa 2010, "Using genetic algorithm in a dynamic model of speculative attack", Proceedings of the 6-th Finance Conference, Ponta Delgada, Portugal, 2010 "Kto korzysta z internetowych usług medycznych w Polsce?"(with Karole Korczak), w: "Technologie informatyczne w administracji publicznej i słuzbie zdrowia", Wydawnictwo SGH, Warszawa 2010, „Global stability of dynamic models” (with Aleksander Welfe), Economic Modelling 2010, Vol. 28, Issue 3, p. 782-784. “Cointegration Approach to the Estimation of Exchange Market Pressure in Slovakia” (with Bogna GawrońskaNowak), Journal of Business and Economics, 2011, Vol. 2, Issue 1, p. 13-24.

Prof. Krytyna Iglicka
Education: 2003 habilitated doctor in Economics, University of Warsaw. Ph.D in Economics, Warsaw School of Economics. 1988 M.Sc in Economics, University of Warsaw. 96
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Employment: Since September 2007 – Associate Professor, Lazarski University. October 2003 till August 2007: Associate Professor, L. K. Academy of Management, Warsaw. February 1999 till September 2003, Assistant Professor, L. K. Academy of Management. June 1999 till September 2003, Assistant Professor, Institute for Social Studies, University of Warsaw. May 1993 – June 1999, Assistant Professor, Institute for Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics. May 1988 – May 1993, Research Fellow, Institute for Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics. Academic Experience: October 1993-December 1993: visiting faculty member: The Curtis L. Carlson School of Management, University of Minnesota. September 1996 – August 1999: Co-ordinator of the Polish Migration Project at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College London (teaching and research). September 1999 - June 2000: Senior Fulbright Fellow, Department of Sociology, University of Pennsylvania (research). October 2003 till present: member of the Scientific Board at ISS UW and a Research Fellow. Professional Experience: January 2001-February 2004: Director, Migration and Eastern Policy Program, Institute of Public Affairs, Warsaw. September 2000 – October 2003: Deputy Director, Institute for Social Studies (ISS), University of Warsaw. January 2002 till present: Polish government advisor and expert on migration policy (Ministry of Internal Affairs and Administration, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Labour and Social Policy) March 2004 till present: Coordinator of Migration and Homeland Security Project, Centre for International Organisation, Warsaw. Since 2000 till present: consultant or expert to various international organisations e.g. European Commission, International Organisation for Migration, OECD.

Dr Jarosław Jura
EDUCATION 2006 University of Warsaw, Faculty of Sociology and Philosophy, Institute of Sociology, PhD in Sociology, dissertation title: Social functions of eating and drinking behaviour. Anthropological study of contemporary Beijing Major: Interactional Sociology, Sociology and Anthropology of Food Minor: China studies University of Lodz, Faculty of Economics and Sociology, Master of Science in Sociology Major: Sociology of Communication, Sociology of Culture Minor: Interactional Sociology

1996

PRESENT POSITION since 2007 research fellowship, Institute of Civic Space and Public Policy, Warsaw AREAS QUALIFIED TO TEACH Sociology, Sociology of Organization, Sociology of Culture, Sociology of Communication, Negotiations, CrossCultural Business and Organization Culture, Conversational Analyse, Qualitative Methods, Social Anthropology, Asian Studies, Chinese Studies, Social Transitions in Contemporary China, Asian Business Culture CURRENT SCHOLARLY INTEREST Globalisation, Social and Cultural Change, China Studies, Interaction Behaviour Patterns Changes, Sociology of Food, Internet Influence on the Personal Identity SELECTED PUBLICATIONS 97
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  

Jura J., “Chinese Table manners. Consequences of Hybridisation” in: D. Schirmer, G. Saalmann, Ch. Kessler (ed.), Hybridising East and West, LIT – Verlag, Munster, 2006 Jura J. (co-writer), 2004, “Rozdział VI” in: M. Boni, S. Golinowska (red.), W trosce o pracę. Raport o rozwoju społecznym Polska 2004, Program Narodów Zjednoczonych Ds. Rozwoju, Warszawa Jura J., Nykiel R, Żelazo K., 1997, „I tu jest pełna zgoda” in: M. Czyżewski, S. Kowalski, A. Piotrowski (ed.) Rytualny chaos. Studium dyskursu publicznego, Wyd. Aureus, Kraków

Piotr Kłossowicz, MA
MA in English Philology, Warsaw University (1995); in 1994 scholarship at University of Warwick, UK (Theory of Translation, British History and Culture, Jewish Studies). Teaches English as a second language at Lazarski University since 1999 and Academic Writing since 2003. Works also as a translator & interpreter i.a. for the Trade Section of the UK embassy in Warsaw; translated several books, including Oxford Dictionary of Biography and The Breaking of Nations. Law and Order in 21st Century by Robert Cooper.

Dr. Agata A. Kocia
Since 2009 an adjunct at Department of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw and at Lazarski University. Ph.D. in Economics with a thesis entitled “Tax systems competition and economic growth in European Union countries. Economic-institutional approach”. In 2004 graduated from Suffolk University, Department of Management, MBA program. Research area: Public economics in the area of institutional regulation particularly: - taxation in European Union member countries with respect to positives and negatives of competition and harmonization - institutional aspects of foreign direct investment into European region - possible incorporation of institutional improvements in Poland’s public administration. Selected publications: 1. Kocia Agata, Nehrebecka Natalia, „Analysis of poverty in Poland in 1997 - 2000 using hazard models”, Working Papers Series, 2009 v. 9, s. 1-28. 2. Torrisi C. Richard, Delaunay Christian J., Kocia Agata, „FDI and EU accession: The experience of Spain and Poland”, The Journal of Current Research in Global Business (JCRGB), 2009. 3. Kocia Agata, et al., „FDI in Transition Economies: The Case of Poland”, Journal of Applied Business Economics, 2009, v. 9(3), s. 46-59. 4. Kocia Agata, „Tax system as a factor attracting investment into the European Union member countries”, Argumenta Oeconomica, 2009, v. 1(22), s. 103-124. 5. Kocia Agata, et al., „FDI in Poland: Determinants and implications for countries in transition”, Ekonomia, 2008, v. 23, s. 3-15 6. Kocia Agata, et al., “Determinants and Policy Implications: FDI in Central Europe” Journal of International Finance and Economics (JIFE), 2008, v. 4(8), s. 136-147. 7. Kocia Agata, „Impact of EU taxation systems on 1998-2004 economic growth”, Argumenta Oeconomica, 2008, v. 2(21), s. 5-25. 8. Kocia Agata, „Fiscal systems competition: Hypotheses and empirical results”, Argumenta Oeconomica, 2008, v. 1(20), s. 31-44. 9. Kocia Agata, „Analysis of KPMG Poland: Application of McKinsey’s 7s Model and SWOT Method”, Service Management, 2007, v. 1, s. 89-97.

Dr. Andrzej C. Kondratowicz e-mail: kondratowicz@lazarski.edu.pl Current positions/functions: 98
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 Associate Professor at the Lazarski University, Dept. of Economics & Business [full time];  Senior Lecturer at the University of Warsaw, Dept. of Economic Sciences [half-time] also:  Member of the Board of the Adam Smith Research Centre in Warsaw  Member of the Board of the Society of Polish Economists  Member of the PL-US Lodge Education:  Ph. D. in Economics, University of Warsaw, dept. of Economic Sciences, 1988;  42 credits on the Doctoral Program in Economics at SUNY-Stony Brook, NY, US, 1984  M.A. in Economics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, NY, US, 1984  M.A. in Economics, University of Warsaw, Department of Social Sciences, 1977 Research & teaching: Macroeconomics; Small and Medium-sized Enterprises; Economic Freedom; Public Sector Economics, Institutional Economics Selected publications (2008-2011):  Kondratowicz, A. (2008), Meandry wolności gospodarczej [w:] Błoński M., Tendencje i perspektywy polskiej gospodarki, Warszawa 2008, TEP, s. 29 – 44  Kondratowicz, A. (2008), Samorząd lokalny a wolność gospodarcza i demokracja [w:] Kleer, J. (red.), Samorząd lokalny – dobro publiczne, CeDeWu, Warszawa, s.25 - 45  Kondratowicz, A., J Starzyk (2009), Czy istnieje optymalny poziom gęstości małych i średnich przedsiębiorstw?, OLYMPUS Czasopismo Naukowe, 2 (2009), s. 80 - Kondratowicz, A. (2009), Samorząd lokalny a dobra publiczne. – wprowadzenie do badań empirycznych [w:] Kleer, J. (red.), Samorząd lokalny. Od teorii do badań empirycznych, CeDeWu, Warszawa, s.7 - 24  Kondratowicz, A. (2009), Bieżący kryzys a przewidywanie przyszłego kształtu ekonomii i gospodarki [w:] Kleer, J., E. Mączyńska, A. Wierzbicki (red.), Co ekonomiści myślą o przyszłości, PAN, PTE i Polskie Towarzystwo Współpracy z Klubem Rzymskim, Warszawa, s. 99 - 122  Kondratowicz, A. (2010), Rola sektora MSP w różnych fazach transformacji systemowej [w:] Adamowicz, E. (red.), Transformacja po latach. Tom poświęcony prof. Janowi Winieckiemu w 70-tą rocznicę urodzin, Wydawnictwo C. H. Beck, Warszawa, s. 95 – 128.  Kondratowicz, A. (2010), Państwo niedoskonałe w zglobalizowanej gospodarce przyszłości [w:] Galwas, B., J.Kleer, A. Wierzbicki (red.), Wyzwania przyszłości. Szanse i zagrożenia rozwoju, Komitet Prognoz przy Prezydium PAN ’Polska 2000 Plus’, Warszawa, 51 – 84.  Kondratowicz, A. (2011), Porównawcza analiza systemów gospodarczych - jej ewolucja a dylematy badawcze ekonomistów [w:] Dudek, Maciej K. (red.), O systemie gospodarczym, Wydawnictwo SGH, Warszawa, forthcoming..  Kondratowicz, A. (2011), Mechanizmy kształtujące ład instytucjonalny w erze globalizacji - refleksje ekonomisty [w:] J.Kleer, A. Wierzbicki (red.), Polska 2050, Komitet Prognoz przy Prezydium PAN ’Polska 2000 Plus’, Warszawa, forthcoming.

Łukasz Konopielko, Ph.D
MA in International Economics, University of Sussex, UK. PhD in Economics University College London, UK. Researcher in financial reforms in Eastern Europe. Central and East European Economic Research Center, Warsaw. Lecturer at University of Surrey, Collegium Civitas and Wyższa Szkoła Promocji. Experience with telecommunication industry (Exatel S.A) fund management (PZU NFI). Assessor in various EU grant schemes related to telecommunication, SME development and innovations. Research area: Telecommunication, e-business, finances. Selected publications: Luka Popytowa na usługi mobilne na Białorusi (with E.Dovnar), Przegląd Telekomunikacyjny, vol. LXXXIV, 4/2011, pp.129-132, Warszawa, 2011. 99
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Polityka spójności stabilizatorem czy hamulcem rozwoju? (with W.Bieńkowski), Prace naukowe Uniwersytetu Ekonomicznego we Wrocławiu, vol.95, Wrocław, 2010. Provision of teleinformatic services by infrastructure enterprises (z J. Wytrębowicz) in: Information Technologies in Economics and Innovative Management (ed. J.T. Duda) AGH University of Science and Technology Press, Kraków 2007 Chapter: “Pension Reform and Privatisation in CEE: Opportunities Lost”, (with R. Charlton and R. McKinnon) pp. 37-58 in: Central and Eastern Europe in Transition, Nova Scence Publishers, NY, 2001. Foreign Banks entry into Central and East European Markets: motives and activities, Post-Communist Economies, vol.11 no.4, pp. 463-485 Dec.1999 (ISI 1463-1377). The Emergence of Contractual Savings Sectors in Transition Economies: Business and Policy in the Rise of the Non-State Pension Fund, (with R. Charlton and R. McKinnon), European Journal of Financial Services, 3(3), pp.24-47, July 1999. "A Note on Polish Bank Consolidation", Journal of Comparative Economics, Vol.25(3), pp. 441-447, 1997 (ISI 0147-5967).

Dr. Katarzyna Kopczewska, PhD
Assistant Professor, Lazarski University; Assistant Professor and ERASMUS LLP Coordinator at Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw; Coach in SENSE (Strategic Economic Needs and Security Simulation Exercise) programme with The United States Institute of Peace for Ministry of Foreign Affairs; visiting lecturer in Bologna, Padova, Murcia, Cartagena, External expert in CASE (2008), Central Statistical Office (2008), Masovian Regional Planning Office (2009), Allerhand Institute (2010), Ecorys (2011) Education: - Ph. D. in Economics, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw (2007) (First prize winner in XV edition of best Ph.D. thesis prof.W.Kula contest for research on socio-economic initiatives in economics, history and social sciences; organized by DnB NORD Bank) - MA in Economics, specialisation Econometrics and Computer Science, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw (2003) (Second prize winner of best M.A thesis contest in field: Promotion of financial instruments placed on Warsaw Stock Exchange, organized by: Foundation for Capital Market Education and supported by Warsaw Stock Exchange and Ministry of Education and Sport) Research area Quantitative methods for business (in MS Excel) – financial and marketing modelling, methods in economics (statistics and econometrics) - traditional and spatial, spatial modeling with use of GIS maps, R software, socioeconomic development, regional science, regional development problems, public sector Selected publications Books: Rola sektora publicznego w przestrzennym rozwoju państwa (The role of the public sector in the spatial development of country), CeDeWu, Warsaw, ca. 215 pages, 2011 Metody ilościowe w R. Aplikacje ekonomiczne i finansowe (Quantitative Methods R software: Economic and Financial Applications), a book edited by Katarzyna Kopczewska, Tomasz Kopczewski, Piotr Wojcik, CeDeWu, Warsaw, ca. 650 pages, 2009 Renta geograficzna a rozwój społeczno-gospodarczy (Geographical Rent in Socio-economic Development), CeDeWu, Warsaw, ca. 200 pages, 2008 Ekonometria i statystyka przestrzenna z wykorzystaniem programu R CRAN (Spatial Econometrics and Statistics with the R software), CeDeWu, Warsaw, ca. 160 pages, 2006 Chapters in books: Konsekwencje relatywnej peryferyzacji gmin (The consequences of the relative peripheralization of municipalities) in eds J. Kowalik, A. Bednarz, XX lat samorządu terytorialnego w Polsce. Doświadczenia – problemy – 100
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perspektywy (XX years of local government in Poland. Experiences - problems – prospects), Publisher: Adam Marszalek, Torun, p. 105-115, 2011

Dr. Maciej Krzak
Assistant Professor, Lazarski University. Head of Macroeconomic Forecasting at a think-tank Centre for Social and Economic Research (CASE), Warsaw Education: Ph. D. in Economics from SGH in Warsaw (1984), Completed doctoral program and all preliminary exams at Wayne State University (“All but dctor”): 1989-1993 M.A. in Economics from Wayne State University in Detroit (1993). Research area Macroeconomics of open economies, monetary theory and policy, fiscal policy, monetary integration, exchange rate determination and regimes Selected publications Poland: From Crisis Resilience to Robust Growth, co-authored with Kaspar Richter, in M. K. Nabli (ed.) The Great Recession and Developing Countries. Economic Impact and Growth Prospects. Word Bank, Washington, D.C., 2011 Stan finansów publicznych w krajach UE – Skala problemu i przyczyny pogorszenia in: Jak posprzątać po kryzysie ? (Public Finance in the EU – Causes of Deterioration and How Serious It Is), CASE, Zeszyt nr 107, 2010 Sytuacja na międzynarodowych rynkach finansowych in: Jan Winiecki editor, Kryzys globalny. Początek czy koniec ? (Conditions on International Financial Markets in the book Global Crisis: Beginning or End ?), Wydawnictwo Regan Press, 2009 Portugalskie zaniechania – memento dla polskiej polityki fiskalnej (Portuguese Complacency – a Postscript for the Polish Fiscal Policy), CASE, Zeszyt nr 94, February 2008 Oddzielnie do euro (Euro Accession – Apart) in: Perspektywy wejścia do strefy euro, CASE, Zeszyt nr 85, June 2006 Poland: growth dividend not high enough for Maastricht fiscal criterion to be met, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies (WIIW), Monthly Report No. 4/2006 Kurs walutowy i wzrost gospodarczy (The Exchange Rate and Economic Growth) co-authored with Stefan Kawalec, “Gospodarka Narodowa” 9/2001: 48-71. Zewnętrzne szoki a reakcje polityki pieniężnej (Monetary Policy Responses to External Shocks), „Bank i Kredyt” no. 7-8, July 2000, National Bank of Poland (www.nbp.pl) Is Direct Targeting an Alternative for Central Europe ? The Case of the Czech Republic and Poland, co-author: Helmut Ettl, Focus on Transition 1/1999, National Bank of Austria, OeNB (www.oenb.co.at). Contagion Effects of the Russian Financial Crisis on Central and Eastern Europe: The Case of Poland, Focus on Transition 2/1998, OeNB. The Present State of Monetary Governance in Selected Central and Eastern European Countries, co-authored with Aurel Schubert, Focus on Transition 1/1997, OeNB. Persistent Moderate Inflation in Hungary and Poland, Focus on Transition 2/1996, OeNB.

Dr. Andrew J. Kurnicki
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Lecturer at the School of Management, University of Warsaw, Member of US Chambers of Commerce and Trade Organization, President – EuroAmerican Company, USA, Investment Banker – Legg Mason, USA, Chairman – RAPS S.A. – Polish/American Comp, President - Grand Hetman LtD, USA, M.A.S. - The Johns Hopkins University, USA, Executive Program – Harvard, MIT – Boston, USA. In 2011 received PhD at the Warsaw University. Research area international finance, investment banking, monetary policy.

Dr. Konrad Leśniak
Education 1979 – 1987 1977 – 1978 1972 -1976 1970 – 1972 Ph.D. (Physical Sciences) M.Sc. (Theoretical Physics) B.Sc. (Combined Honours in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy,Ordinary degree in Chemistry and Psychology) Secondary Education (6 SCE “Higher” Grade and 7 “O” Level ) Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland Warsaw University, Poland Glasgow University, Scotland, UK Hyndland Senior Secondary School, Glasgow, Scotland, UK

Work Experience 2009 1991 - 2009 1981-1993 1979 - 1991 1978-1984

Lecturer on Capital Market Investing and Corporate Finance at the University of Economics and Computer Science and at Skarbek University in Warsaw (lectures in English) Translator/ Interpreter; Formal registration of the business in 1995; Polish/English translation and interpreting (consecutive and simultaneous) International Baltic Sea Fishery Commission; First Reporter at Annual Sessions and Meetings Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland; Research work in the field of solid state spectroscopy. Final position held : Adjunkt Polish Travel Agency "ORBIS"; Tour Leader

Current Membership in Professional Organisations 1982 Polish Physical Society Publications, Awards, and Professional Recognition Publications: A number of research papers in the area of rare-earth spectroscopy published in international (British and US) archival journals, Polish journals, and conference proceedings. Other: International scientific exchange visitor at Humboldt University (Berlin, Germany) (two visits in the 1980s) and the University of Virginia (Charlottesville, USA) (1991). A number of certificates of recognition for various interpreting assignments. VI Other Relevant Information Experience as a private investor in the Polish capital markets since 1995.

Professor Karol Lutkowski PhD
Previous academic positions Warsaw School of Economics (Szkoła Główna Handlowa), Warsaw professor in Finance and International Finance (till September 2010), College for Economics and Informatics (Wyższa Szkoła Ekonomiczno-Informatyczna, 102
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Head of the Chair for Banking (2000-2009) Education and Research 1963 – graduated from the Warsaw School of Economics 1969 - PhD diploma in Economics and Finance 1974 - Habilitation 1986 – Associate Professor 2003 - Professor Throughout the period of academic career – holding lectures and seminars in Finance and in International Finance. Research work in monetary theory and financial policy (with special focus upon problems of monetary stabilization, fight against inflation and evolution of the international monetary system). In recent years: a shift in focus to problems of monetary unification, the nature and preconditions of financial and real convergence. Research work abroad: several 3 month research stints in Mexico (UNAM – 1976/7), Italy (CESES – Milano, 1977), Federal Republic of Germany (1987 - a scholarship of the F.Ebert Stiftung), France and the United Kongdom (several summer-month stays with banks and trade enterprises in Paris and London). Publications: Author of eight books (in Polish) on: problems of monetary stabilization, the evolution and structure of the international monetary system, the financial reforms in East-Central Europe in the 90’s and on the prospects for Poland’s paricipation in the euro area. Also co-author of books published abroad: „Inflation und Schattenwirtschaft im Sozialismus”, ed. D. Cassel. D. Kath, H.J. Paffenholz, Hamburg 1989, „Towards a Market Economy in Central and Eastern Europe”, Springer Verlag, Berlin – Heidelberg, 1991, „La Nouvelle Europe de l’Est – du plan au marche”, Bruxelles, 1991, „Economic Reform in Poland – the Aftermath of Martial Law”, ed. David Kemme, Greenwich, Conn., 1988, „Die Europaeische Waehrungsunion - ein Testfall fuer die Europaeische Integration” Verlag Arno Spitz, Berlin 1997 „Completing the Transition – the Main Challenges”, Springer Verlag, ed. Gertrude Tumpel-Gugerel, Lindsay Wolfe, Peter Mooslechner, Berlin – New York 2001. Business Experiece and Public Functions: 1989 – 1991 - adviser to the Minister of Finance December 1991 – February 1992 - Minister of Finance 1992 – 1997 – Adviser to the Government 1994 – 1995 – Member of the supervisory board of the PBK Bank in Poland 2008 – 2010 - Adviser to the Chairman of the National Bank of Poland Membership - The Association of Polish Economists (PTE)

Dr. Maciej Malicki
Education: 2007 August, PhD in Mathematics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA, 2000 March, MSc in Mathematics, Warsaw University, Poland Academic Achievements: 2007August, PhD in Mathematics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA. Research experience: 2002-2007, PhD student, graduate and teaching research assistant, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, USA, Investigated the structure of Polish groups and their relations with metric spaces, measure theory and logic. 2000-2002, PhD student, Warsaw University of Technology, Poland, Investigated ordered sets, in particular well partially ordered sets, extensions of partial orders to linear orders, and linear orders. 1993-1999, Master's student, Warsaw University, Poland. In his Master's thesis, investigated the Borel complexity 103
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of arc-components of planar continua. Research publications: 1. Notes on the length, the structure and the cardinality of a chain, Order 21 (2004), no.3, 201-205. 2. On operations and linear extensions of well partially ordered sets, (with A. Rutkowski), Order 21 (2004), no.1, 717. 3. O gwoździach Searle'a. Analiza składu, Przegląd Filozoficzno-Literacki, 2006. 4. Polishable subspaces of Banach spaces, to appear in Real Analysis Exchange. 5. An example of a Polish group, to appear in Journal of Symbolic Logic. 6. Non-locally compact Polish groups and two-sided translates of open sets, to appear in Fund. Math. 7. Isometry groups of separable metric spaces, (with S.Solecki), to appear in Math. Proc. Cambridge Phil. Soc. 8. Descriptive complexity of certain classes of Polish groups, in preparation. List of participations in conferences, workshops: 1. Workshop on Mathematical Biology, MSRI, Berkeley, USA, June 2006 2. Logic Colloquium 2006, Neimegen, Holland, August 2006, contributed talk 3. Workshop on the Urysohn space, Beer-sheva, Israel, May 2006 4. Logic Colloquium 2008, Bern, Switzerland, contributed talk. Awards and honors: 1. Graduate College Fellowship, spring 2007 2. Research Experience for Graduate Students Fellowship, summer 2004 3. Research Experience for Graduate Students Fellowship, summer 2003 4. Money prize for scientific achievements, spring 2002.

Rafał Matera, Ph.D.
Professor of University of Lodz (Faculty of Economics and Sociology, Department of History of Economic Thought and Economic History); Lecturer, Lazarski University, Warsaw. Education: 1996 2001 2011 M.A. in History from University of Lodz Ph.D. in Economics from University of Lodz Habilitation in Economics

Research area Economic History, History of Economic Thought, International Political Relations, Global Economy, Transatlantic Relations Selected publications BOOKS: Integracja ekonomiczna krajów nordyckich, Wydawnictwo Adam Marszałek, Toruń 2001. [co-author Janusz Skodlarski], Gospodarka światowa. Geneza i rozwój, Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN, Warszawa 2004. Paulus Kruger. Biografia burskiego prezydenta, Europejskie Centrum Edukacyjne, Toruń 2004. [co-author Paulina Matera], Stany Zjednoczone – Europa. Stosunki polityczne i gospodarcze. 1776-2004, Wydawnictwo Książka i Wiedza, Warszawa 2007. G8 jako instytucja gospodarki światowej, Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Łódzkiego, Łódź 2009. 104
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ARTICLES: Czy odwrót historii? Rozważania na temat miejsca historii w nauce, [w:] Z historii myśli ekonomicznej i historii gospodarczej, red. J. Skodlarski, Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Łódzkiego, Łódź 2006, s. 93-105. G7/G8 as a Global Manager, [w:] 4’E’s “Economic Development, Environment, Energy and Ethics, in a Global Economy, ed. D. Frear & W. Taylor, Congress of Political Economists, International, USA 2007, pp. 279-293. Działania Marttiego Ahtisaariego na rzecz rozwiązywania konfliktów, „Przegląd Zachodni”, Poznań 2010, nr 4, s. 318.

Dr Richard Mbewe
Research area International Economics, International Finance, International Marketing. PERSONAL PROFILE 21. Professor/lecturer of International Political Economics, Strategic Management, Management of International Finance, Principles of Marketing and International Marketing 22. Curriculum developer & Established Public Speaker 23. Supervisor of Master’s thesis and students’ mentor. 24. Economic Analyst & Blogger on economic issues: Bankier.pl QUALIFICATIONS: May 1998 - Sept. 1999 May 1991 - June 1996 Oct 1984 - Feb 1991 ADDITIONAL TRAINING: October 2001 March 2001 June 1999 Oct 1997 – March 1998 MBA - University of Calgary Ph.D in Development Economics - University of Warsaw M.Sc. in Chemical Engineering - Warsaw University of Technology. Forex risk management Course in Warsaw Financial Controlling & Managerial Accounting in Warsaw Xerox's in-house Sales Management Course in London Investment Advisors' Course in Warsaw

Extracurricular Activities  Individual member of the British-Polish Chamber of Commerce  Member of the Economists Association of Poland (TEP).  Member of the Foreign Economic Policy Advisory Committee at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Poland. ACADEMIC PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE University of Wales (at WSHiP in Warsaw, Poland) Lecturer Sept. 2004 - present 17. Lecturer of International Economics and Finance (management of international finance, principles of marketing, international marketing, international economics & international political economics) at University of Wales' Master of Science degree in International Business Economics at the Lazarski University in Warsaw in Poland. 18. Directing of Master’s thesis work of students. Preparing course materials, syllabus, preparation & marking examinations. Liaison with the University of Wales. 19. Conducting research on: Poland and the EU, BPO and its impact on the economy, African Economies & Globalization and Global financial issues. Various academic institutions in Poland Lecturer Sept. 1997 - present 20. Lecturer of International Economics and related subjects 21. Directing of Master’s thesis work of students. Preparing course materials, syllabus, preparation & marking examinations. 22. Students mentoring. Publications (selected articles) 105
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Mbewe R & Dean H., 2008. Improving through Moving: Report on BPO Opportunities in Poland. Colliers International Poland Mbewe R., 2007. Finansowanie z UE – trudny orzech do zgryzienia. Fundusze Europejskie nr. 1 (20) styczeń – luty 2007. Mbewe R., 2007. Fundusze a polska rzeczywistość. Fundusze Europejskie nr. 3 (22) maj – czerwiec 2007. Mbewe R., 2005. Trudne życie w strefie euro. „Gazeta Prawna” nr. 5 (1370). Mbewe R., 2004. Nowy sposób na oddłużenie świata. „Gazeta Prawna” nr. 168 (1277). Mbewe R., 2003. Czy to kres oddziaływania monetarnego na gospodarkę. „Życie Warszawy” 20 January 2003. Mbewe R., 2002. Raport rok po ataku: Terroryzm a gospodarka. „Inwestor Finansowy”. Mbewe R., 2001. Globalizacja: Tak ale tylko z biednymi. „Rzeczpospolita” nr. 216, 15.09.2001. Mbewe R., 2001. Czy złotówce grożą walutowi spekulanci?. „Home & Market” nr. 2 (103). Mbewe R., 2001. Lekcja dla Polski, czyli wzloty i upadki dotcomów. „Home & Market” nr. 4 (104).

Andrzej Nałęcz, Ph. D. andrzejnalecz@gmail.com Present Academic Positions Since 2008 Assistant professor, Management Faculty of Warsaw University (Wydział Zarządzania Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego). Since 2010 - Assistant professor, Faculty of Information Technology in Management, Academy of Applied Information Science and Management (Wydział Informatycznych Technik Zarządzania, Szkoła Wyższa Informatyki Stosowanej i Zarządzania), Warsaw. Previous Position 2004-2008 Junior lecturer at Management Faculty of Warsaw University. Education 1999-2004 Law and Administration Faculty of Warsaw University, major: law, M.A. degree 2004. 2004-2008 Ph. d. program at Management Faculty of Warsaw University. Ph. d. dissertation, Law and Administration Faculty of Warsaw University 2008. Current Fields of Research, Teaching and Publications Administrative and business law, specifically the issues of economic freedom, administrative discretion and general principles of law. Recent publications Sankcje administracyjne w świetle Konstytucji RP, (Administrative Sanctions in the Polish Constitution), an article in Sankcje administracyjne - blaski i cienie, M. Stahl, Z. Duniewska, M. Lewicki (red.), Wolters Kluwer Polska, forthcoming 2011. Uznanie administracyjne a reglamentacja działalności gospodarczej, (Discretionary Powers and Restrictions of Business activity), a monograph, Wydawnictwo Sejmowe, Warsaw 2010. Zasada proporcjonalności jako zasada ogólna postępowania administracyjnego, (The Principle Of Proportionality As A General Principle Of Administrative Procedure), an article in: Przegląd dyscyplin badawczych pokrewnych nauce prawa i postępowania administracyjnego, S. Wrzosek, M. Domagała, J. Izdebski, T. Stanisławski , Wydawnictwo KUL, Lublin 2010. With R. Lewandowski - Wspieranie inicjatyw lokalnych przez administrację rządową w regionie płockim, (Support of Local Initiative by Government Administration in the Płock Region), an article in Społeczne i finansowe uwarunkowania rozwoju regionu płockiego, A. Z. Nowak, M. Szałański, Wydawnictwo Naukowe Wydziału Zarządzania Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Warsaw 2010. Kontrola działalności gospodarczej przedsiębiorcy, (Control of enterprises) a chapter in a business law handbook: Prawo gospodarcze publiczne, S. Piątek, I. Postuła , Wydawnictwo Naukowe Wydziału Zarządzania Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Warsaw 2009.

Dr Jarosław Neneman
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University of Lodz. M.A. diploma. Summer School of Economics, Olsztyn, Poland (lecturers: H. Varian, Leonardo Leiderman, Guillermo Calvo). Central European University (Prague, Czech Republic), Postgraduate Studies in Economics, MA in Economics (1992). Ph.D. diploma (1997). Ministry of Finance, advisor, Chief of political cabinet (2003 - 2004).Ministry of Finance, Undersecretary of State, responsible for tax policy (2004 - 2005, 2006). Centre of Tax Documentation and Studies, Lodz, Deputy director (2006 , 2007-). Present academic position: Lecturer, Institute of Economics, University of Lodz, Lecturer, Lazarski University, Warsaw. Selected publications: What taxes do you pay?, in: „Economics for dummies”, CEDEWU, 2007 (in Polish) Public Finance Reform. Taxation and public spending in: „What reforms are needed in Poland”, coauthor, CASE, 2006. Tax reform in Poland, in: “Vital Areas for Economic Reform”, ed. B. Błaszczyk, CASE, 2006 (in Polish) The Reform of Indirect Taxation in Czech Republic, Hungry, Poland and Romania, CASE, 1998 Soft Budget Constraints; co-author, in: Growth, Restructuring and Unemployment in Poland, ed. T. Tokarski, University of Łódź, 2002 (in Polish)

Dariusz Kajetan Rosati
Present position: Professor, Warsaw School of Economics and Ryszard Lazarski University of Commerce and Law, Warsaw. Author and/or co-author of over 250 publications including six books. Born in 1946 in Radom, Poland. 1969, Master’s Degree in International Economics from Warsaw School of Economics; 1973, PhD in Decision Making Theory; 1978, Habilitation Degree in Economic Forecasting. 1969-1990, assistant professor, then associate professor in Warsaw School of Economics; 1990, full Professor, Economic Policy and International Economics in Warsaw School of Economics. 1978-1979, Consultant Economist, Citibank, New York; 1972-1992, expert for various international organizations (UNIDO, World Bank, European Commission, ILO); 1985, established and became first director of World Economy Research Institute at WSE, Warsaw; 1986-1987, Visiting Fulbright Scholar at Princeton University, USA; 1988-1991, Director, Foreign Trade Research Institute; 1991-1995, Head, Transition Economies Section, United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, Geneva; 1995-1997, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Republic of Poland; 1998-2004, Member, Monetary Policy Committee, National Bank of Poland; 2002-2004, Adviser to the President of the European Commission; 2004-2009, Member of the European Parliament;

Dr. Krzysztof Szczygielski
BSc in mathematics, Warsaw University, Department of Mathematics. M.A. in International Economics Warsaw School of Economics. PhD defended the Collegium of Management and Finance (Title of dissertation: Product differentiation in the Polish manufacturing exports – an analysis based on consumer choice theory). Supported by grants from ING Bank and the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher, Education Warsaw School of Economics. Professional experience: Assistant Professor at the Chair of Economics at Lazarski School of Commerce and Law, teaching: microeconomics, macroeconomics, international economics, mathematical economics, regional economics. Since 2001 CASE – Center for Social and Economic Research- researcher Selected publications: Szczygielski K., Magda I., Identifying Vertical Product Differentiation in Three Polish Manufacturing Industries: an Enterprise Survey, CASE Studies & Analyses, Warsaw 2006. Marczewski, K., Szczygielski, K., Growth and Performance Factors in Polish Manufacturing Firms in 1998-2003 in the Light of Survey Data, CASE Studies & Analyses, Warsaw 2006. Błaszczyk B., Szczygielski K. (eds)., Lisbon Strategy at Midterm : Expectations and Reality (co-editor), CASE Reports, Warsaw 2004 ; 107
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Szczygielski K. (ed), Policy Makers or Policy Takers. Visegrad Countries Joining the EU - Selected Studies CASE, Warsaw 2003; Marczewski, K., Szczygielski, K., The Process of Structural Change and its Determinants in Polish Manufacturing, 1995 -2003 in: Hashi I., Welfens P.J, Wziatek-Kubiak, A (ed), Industrial Competitiveness and Restructuring in Enlarged Europe: How Accession Countries Catch Up and Integrate in the EU, Palgrave Macmillan, London 2007

Dr. Maciej Turała maciej.turala@gmail.com EDUCATION X.2002 – XI.2006:  Doctoral studies at the Faculty of Management (Lodz University). Title of doctoral dissertation: “Integrated management of communal finance with regards to socioeconomic development of communes”. The dissertation was publicly defended on October 23, 2006. The Council of the Faculty of Management granted a Ph.D. title on November 20, 2006. X.1998 – VI.2002:  Studies at the Faculty of Management (Lodz University) – finished with a distinction.Title of the master thesis: “Principles of pro-development budget construction according to comparative study of twin cities: Lodz and Tampere”. PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE: Since XII 2006:  Adjunct professor at the Department of City and Regional Management (Faculty of Management, University of Lodz). X.2003 – XII 2006:  Assistant professor at the Department of City and Regional Management (Faculty of Management, University of Lodz). PUBLICATIONS (CHOSEN):  2010: “Finansowe uwarunkowania kształtowania i funkcjonowania obszarów metropolitalnych w Polsce”, Wiadomości Statystyczne, 2010.  2009: “Metropolitan areas in Poland – financial dimension”, (in:) T. Markowski, M. Turała (eds.): „Theoretical and practical aspects of urban and regional development”, Studia Regionalia, Nr XXIV, 2009. 2009: “Innovations and space- European and national approach”, co-edited with Tadeusz Markowski and Piotr Żuber, Studia Regionalia, No. XXIII, 2009. 2009: „Financial Autonomy and Consistency of Central Government Policy Towards Local Governments”, International Review of Administrative Science, Vol. 75, No. 2, June 2009, Sage Publications Ltd. (co-author: Lasse Oulasvirta). 2008: “Polityka regionalna UE a intra-regionalne zróżnicowania w poziomie rozwoju. Przykład województwa łódzkiego” („Regional policy and intra-regional disparities in the level of development. A case study of Lodzkie region”), in: B. Gawrońska-Nowak et al. (eds.) „Efekty integracji europejskiej w wybranych sektorach gospodarki” („Effects of European integration in Chosen sectors of the economy”), University of Lodz Press, Łódź 2008, p. 272-286. 2008: „Pomiar poziomu rozwoju społeczno-gospodarczego gmin na przykładzie województwa łódzkiego” („Measuring the level of socio-economic development of communes – an example of Lodz region”), Folia Oeconomica 215, Łódź 2008. p. 99-124. 2006: “Socio-economic aspects of local development – a case study of Lodz region”, in: T. Markowski, M. Turała (eds.): „New Members – New Challenges for the European Regional Development Policy”, Studia Regionalia, No. XVIII, 2006. 2006: „New Members – New Challenges for the European Regional Development Policy”, co-edited with Tadeusz Markowski, Studia Regionalia, No. XVIII, 2006. 108
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2005: „Financial autonomy of local governments – case studies of Finland and Poland” – prepared in co-operation with prof. Lasse Oulasvirta, (in:) S. Wilmańska-Sosnowska (ed.): Rola nauk o zarządzaniu w kreowaniu społeczeństwa opartego na wiedzy, Folia Oeconomica 195, Łódź 2005, p. 355-372. 2005: „Measuring the financial autonomy of local governments with a Local Autonomy Index”, prepared in co-operation with L. Oulasvirta, Caledonian Business School Working Paper Series, No. 40, Glasgow Caledonian University.



FUNCTIONS:  Member of the European Organizing Committee of the European Regional Science Association (term 2007 – 2010)  Since January 2007 – a plenipotentiary of the Rector for Internationalizing Studies at the Faculty of Management, University of Lodz.  Since July 2005 – secretary of the Polish Section of the ERSA.  Since February 2005 – a member of the task force for metropolitan areas at the Committee for Spatial Economy and Regional Planning at the Polish Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Anna Wasiela anna.wasiela@gmail.com Trainer/training supervisor (Institute of Public Affairs, think-tank), psychologist (Women's Rights Centre), and lecturer (Lazarski School of Commerce and Law, Warsaw University). EDUCATION:  PhD, Psychology, University of Warsaw (2009)  Post Graduate School in Central Banking and Monetary Policy, Institute of Economic Sciences, Polish Academy of Sciences (2009)  M. A., International Commerce, Korea University (Seoul, Korea) (2005)  M. A., Psychology, University of Warsaw (2003)  Graduate courses in Economic Psychology and Music Psychology, Vienna University (2001-2002) RESEARCH AREA Intercultural communication, intercultural psychology, business ethics SELECTED PUBLICATIONS In press: Wasiela, A. Korean work ethics – modern but still Confucian. Asia & Pacific Studies, 7/2010, p. 139–158 Wasiela, A., Komunikacja międzykulturowa (Intercultural Communication), chapter in a book, Institute of Public Affairs In review: Wasiela, A., Zajenkowski, M. The psychological costs of achieving the same economic goal in different cultures and living conditions. A study on the temperament of Poles and Koreans. Domurat, A., Wasiela, A. Confucian and Protestant work ethics among Polish and Korean employees and small business owners. Wasiela, A., Zajenkowski, M. Intercultural differences in cognitive abilities on the example of Poles’ and Koreans’ attention and verbal fluency test results.

Piotr Woźniak, Ms.c
Master's degree in geology, Warsaw University. 1992- 1996 he was a Commercial counselor at the Commercial Counsellor's Office (in Montreal) of the Embassy of Poland in Ottawa. 1998- 2000 - Adviser to the prime minister for infrastructure. 2004 -2005- Chairman of the Board of Directors of Ence.Eko Limited, and responsible for 109
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consulting in the field of investment projects in the power industry. 2004 –2005- Expert of the Parliamentary Committee investigating irregularities at Poland's PKN Orlen (Polish Petrol Company). 2005 – 2007- Minister of Economy Other achievements Member of several Supervisory Boards: EuRoPol Gaz S.A. (August 2000-December 2001) and Gas Trading S.A. (December 2000-February 2002), PGNiG S.A. (December 1999-July 2000), EkoFundusz Foundation (May 1998September 2001), KUKE S.A. (July 1998-January 2002) and member of the Council for Motorways (October 1998December 2002). In 2002 he was elected deputy to the Council of Warsaw, Vice-Chairman of the Economic Development and Infrastructure Committee.

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USEFUL VOCABULARY AND TERMS Assessment: methods of evaluation of student’s performance in the class. It consists of final examination, and may include midterm examinations, presentations, group work, short papers, tests, etc. Compensation: a possibility to get a pass without taking a re-sit examination when student’s grade is 38% or 39% and his/her overall average mark is equal or higher than 45%. Core Courses: courses (modules) which are obligatory and constitute the core of the MSc Programme. External Examiner: an examiner who does not belong to the faculty of Lazarski University, or that of the University of Wales who is appointed from a different British university to ensure that the assessment practice is fair and conforms to the British education standards. Internal Examiner: an examiner who belongs to the faculty of Lazarski University and who marks students’ examination papers. Final examinations are marked by two internal examiners. Learning Approach: It shows the way classes are conducted. Usually it says whether it is a lecture or discussion group or a combination of both. Moderator: a professor nominated by the University of Wales to ensure that the teaching and assessment practices conform to the rules agreed in the submission documents and to the British education standards. Optional courses: courses (modules) which are elected by the student and indicate his/her area of specialization. Participation: a part of assessment which indicates students activity in the class. Simple presence is not enough, and participation sometimes includes short tests given in the class to check if students did their homework. Re-sit examination: a second examination for a failed course. Repetition: a course which is taken again because the student failed.

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APPENDIX A - Directions to students at examinations Time of Examination 1.1 1.2 The examinations will be held at times specified in the degree examination time-table. Candidates should be in their seats punctually at the hours fixed for the commencement of the examination. No candidates will be allowed to enter the examination room more than half-an-hour after the time fixed, or to leave until forty-five minutes after the time fixed for the commencement of the examination in each subject. No candidate will be allowed to leave the examination room during the last fifteen minutes of an examination. Seating Arrangements 2 Candidates shall in every examination occupy the seats assigned to them by the invigilator. Examination Materials / Equipment 3.1 Candidates may take into the examination room only such books, mathematical or other tables, printed documents, manuscripts, notes, formulae, electronic equipment or other source of information or assistance as have been approved by the College and the Examining Board. In some cases, where appropriate, candidates will be provided by the College with such material and / or equipment as the examiners consider necessary. Examining Boards shall prepare lists of material and / or equipment to be permitted in examination rooms and candidates shall be notified in advance, in writing of the contents of these lists and which, if any, of the permitted items will be provided by the College. The material and / or equipment which candidates are permitted to bring into the examination room shall bear no marks or notes of any kind other than the name of the owner and anything which is regarded as normal in the nature or construction of the item in question. Unfair Practice 4.1 It is an unfair practice to commit any act whereby a person may obtain for himself/herself or for another, an unpermitted advantage. This shall apply whether the candidate acts alone or in conjunction with another/others. Any action or actions shall be deemed to fall within this definition whether occurring during, or in relation to, a formal examination, a piece of coursework, or any form of assessment undertaken in pursuit of a qualification of the University of Wales. The University of Wales has distinct procedures and penalties for dealing with unfair practice in examination or non-examination conditions. Without prejudice to the generality of the foregoing, examples of unfair practice are shown below. These examples are not exhaustive and other cases may fall within the general definition of unfair practice. 4.2 Introduction into an examination room and/or associated facilities any unauthorised form of materials such as a book, manuscript, data or loose papers, information obtained via any electronic device, or any source of unauthorised information. Copying from or communication with any other person in the examination room and/or associated facilities except as authorised by an invigilator. Communication electronically with any other person, except as authorised by an invigilator. Impersonation of an examination candidate or allowing oneself to be impersonated. Presentation of an examination script as one’s own work when the script includes material produced by unauthorised means. Presentation of evidence of special circumstances to Examining Boards, which evidence is false or 112
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3.2

4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7

falsified or which in any way misleads or could mislead Examining Boards 4.8 A candidate suspected of engaging in an unfair examination practice shall be informed by the invigilator that the circumstances will be reported. Such a candidate may continue with that and subsequent examinations without prejudice to any investigation and decision subsequently to be taken by the University. Failure by an Invigilator to warn a candidate at the time of examination shall not prejudice subsequent investigation by the University of any allegation made against a candidate. An Invigilator who considers, or suspects that a candidate is engaging in an unfair examination practice is authorised by the University to confiscate and retain evidence relating to the alleged unfair practice.

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APPENDIX B - INTERIM VERIFICATION AND APPEALS PROCEDURE This procedure is not applicable to students who have completed their periods of study or to candidates exited with a University of Wales intermediate award (Certificate/Diploma). These students should consult the University of Wales’ Verification and Appeals Procedure. 1 2 3 At the beginning of each session the institution shall inform students of the Appeals Procedures in place (UW and interim). The only body vested with the power of decision on examination results is the relevant Examining Board. A student in an interim examination may only appeal on one or more of the following grounds: .1 the mark(s) and/or result published by the institution contains arithmetical or other errors of fact; .2 defects or irregularities in the conduct of the examinations and/or other assessments or in written instructions or in advice relating thereto which were not known to the Examining Board, when such defects, irregularities or advice are shown to have had an adverse effect on the student's performance; .3 exceptional personal circumstances which were not known to the Examining Board, and where the student can show good reason why such circumstances could not have been made known to the Examining Board when the student was assessed, and which are shown to have had an adverse effect on the student's performance. Appeals which question the academic judgement of examiners, or appeals on any grounds other than those stipulated in 3.1 to 3.3 above, shall not be admissible and the administrative head of the institution will inform the appellant accordingly in writing. The academic head of the institution will consider an appeal within twenty-one days of its receipt by the institution. The member of staff concerned shall not be a member of the Examining Board which previously considered the student case. Any student who wishes to appeal against a decision of the Examining Board should normally submit an appeal to the administrative head of the institution (using the attached form) within fourteen days of the date of the publication of the Examining Board decision by the institution. The grounds for appeal must be clearly stated on the appropriate form and relevant documentary evidence appended. The administrative head of the institution, or his/her nominee, on receipt of an appeal shall seek verification from the Chair of the relevant Examining Board, or his/her nominee. Verification will establish whether: .1 the mark(s) and/or result as published is free from arithmetical or other error of fact; and/or, .2 any defects or irregularities in the conduct of the examinations and/or other assessments or in the written instructions and/or in advice relating thereto were, in fact, reported to the Examining Board; and/or, .3 any exceptional personal circumstances pertaining to the student were reported to the Examining Board. The Chair of the Examining Board, or his/her nominee, shall inform the administrative head of the institution of the outcome of the verification in writing no later than fourteen days following receipt of the appeal by the administrative head of the institution . If the outcome of verification is not received in writing within fourteen days, the academic head of the institution shall refer the appeal to the Examining Board and the Examining Board shall be re-convened to review the case in light of the information presented in the appeal. The academic head of the institution shall consider the appeal on receipt of verification from the Chair of the Examining Board and decide either that: .1 the appeal be referred to the Examining Board and that the Examining Board be re-convened to review the case in light of the information presented. The academic head of the institution shall be permitted to take such action where it has been established: .1 that the mark(s) and/or result as published is incorrect or .2 that defects or irregularities in the conduct of the examinations and/or other assessments or in written instructions or in advice relating thereto were not known to the Examining Board; or .3 that the appeal contains exceptional personal circumstances which were not known to the Examining Board when the student was assessed and the student has shown 114
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6

7

good reason why such circumstances could not have been made known to the Examining Board; the appeal be rejected and no further consideration be given to the appeal. The academic head of the institution is required to disallow an appeal which is based wholly on factors which were known to the Examining Board concerned when the student's result was determined and also to disallow appeals based on exceptional personal circumstances which were not known to the Examining Board when the student was assessed where the student is unable to show good reason why such circumstances could not have been made known to the Examining Board before its meeting. Where an appeal is referred to the Examining Board by the academic head of the institution, the administrative head of the institution shall write to ask the Chair of the relevant Examining Board to reconvene a meeting of the Examining Board to review the case in the light of the information brought forward by the appeal. It will not necessarily follow that a student's result shall be changed from the result originally published by the Examining Board. The Chair of the Examining Board shall inform the administrative head of the institution of the decision of the re-convened Examining Board in writing no later than twenty-one days following its referral to the Examining Board. The administrative head of the institution, or his/her nominee, shall inform the appellant of the outcome of his/her appeal in writing and, if appropriate, issue a supplementary result. The University of Wales shall also be informed of the outcome of all interim appeals. The Validation Board will only consider a complaint against the outcome of an interim appeal based on the following ground: irregularities in the conduct of the interim appeals procedure, which are of such a nature as to cause reasonable doubt on whether the same decision would have been reached had they not occurred. Any such complaint will be dealt with in accordance with the Validation Board’s Student Complaints Procedure. or .2

8

9 10

VERIFICATION AND APPEALS PROCEDURE This procedure Is applicable to:  candidates who have completed their periods of study for initial degrees, foundation degrees, undergraduate University Diplomas and Certificates, or who have been awarded an exit qualification of the University of Wales (institutions have full jurisdiction over appeals in respect of interim results, e.g. vis-à-vis individual modules, and progression. Candidates who wish to appeal against the decision of an interim result should refer to the University of Wales Interim Appeal Procedure; candidates who have completed either of the stages (examination and dissertation) of a taught Master’s degree, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate scheme of study; candidates who have completed the examination component of a Doctoral degree by examination and thesis.



 2.

Appeals Procedure (Postgraduate Research Degree) Is applicable to candidates who have submitted a thesis* for the degrees of: PhD, EngD, DClinPsy, DEdPsy, DNursSci, DMin or EdD, DCounsSci or for a Master’s degree by research (normally MPhil). * In certain circumstances, an artefact accompanied by analytical commentary or published works accompanied by critical analysis may be submitted in place of a thesis

3.

Appeals Procedure (Unfair Practice Decisions) Is applicable to students who wish to appeal against the decision of a Committee of Enquiry convened to consider an allegation of unfair practice.

4.

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Is applicable to students who wish to appeal against the decision of a Committee on Fitness to Practise. Students invoking the Verification and Appeals Procedure are advised to note that the Procedure consists of two distinct stages: firstly, an application to the Institution at which you have studied for verification of the result and, secondly, following completion of the verification process, an application for appeal to the University of Wales. A diagram outlining the entire verification and appeals process is included at the back of this booklet for easy reference. Verification 1. A candidate is entitled to ask for verification of one or more of the following in respect of a University examination: 1.1 1.2 that the assessment published by the University is free of arithmetical or other errors of fact; that the examiners were aware of exceptional personal circumstances reported by the student prior to the meeting of the Examining Board(s) concerned and which might in the student’s opinion have had an adverse effect on his/her academic performance; that the examiners were aware of defects or irregularities in the conduct of the examinations or in written instructions or in advice relating thereto, when such defects or irregularities or advice might, in the student’s opinion, have had an adverse effect on his/her performance.

1.3

In addition, a candidate for a Master’s degree by Examination and Dissertation may, in accordance with the grounds detailed under 1.1 to 1.3 above, seek verification of the decision of the Examining Board not to award the mark of Distinction in respect of either of the parts of the scheme of study (i.e. examination or dissertation). 2. A candidate who wishes to have such verification shall make written application to the Academic Registrar/Secretary, or equivalent, of the institution at which they studied normally within fourteen days of the date of the meeting of the relevant Examining Board. Applications for verification submitted outside this timescale with good reason may be accepted at the discretion of the Academic Registrar/Secretary or equivalent of the institution concerned. Requests for verification must include details of any alleged defects or irregularities in the conduct of the examinations or in any written instructions or in any advice relating thereto, or of any exceptional personal circumstances. Upon receipt of such written application, the Academic Registrar/Secretary, or equivalent, of the Institution, or his/her nominee, shall ask the Chair of the Examining Board, or his/her nominee, to take the necessary steps to verify the facts to which the application refers. The Chair shall ensure that the facts are verified within three weeks of the date of the application. At the same time, the Academic Registrar/Secretary, or equivalent, of the Institution, or his/her nominee, shall acknowledge receipt of the application, informing the candidate of the action being taken, and shall forward to the Director of Academic Affairs (Ref: Appeals) of the University of Wales a copy of the candidate’s application for verification. The Chair of the Examining Board shall, when he/she has completed his/her enquiry, take the following action: 4.1 if the verification procedure indicates that: 


3.

4.

there has been an arithmetical or other factual error;

In the context of this Procedure a University examination is an examination or assessed piece of work which counts towards a candidate’s overall result and which is, therefore, conducted by a University Examining Board comprising both internal and external examiners. 116
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exceptional personal circumstances reported by the student prior to the meeting of the Examining Board(s) concerned were not, in fact, considered at the meeting(s); a candidate, in the course of requesting verification, has provided additional evidence of exceptional personal circumstances which were previously notified prior to the meeting of the Examining Board;



the Chair of the Examining Board shall arrange for the Examining Board to re-consider the candidate’s examination performance. He/she shall then inform the Academic Registrar/ Secretary, or equivalent senior officer, of the Institution concerned and the Director of Academic Affairs (ref: Appeals) of the University of Wales in writing of the full circumstances of the case, and, at the same time, the candidate shall be informed by the Institution of the action being taken. The University, in consultation with the Chair of the Examining Board, shall subsequently arrange for the publication of such supplementary pass-list as may be necessary. 4.2 if the verification procedure indicates that:   there has been no error; any exceptional personal circumstances reported by the candidate have already been considered; there are no defects or irregularities in the conduct of the examinations or in written instructions or advice relating thereto;



the Chair of the Examining Board shall inform the Academic Registrar/Secretary, or equivalent senior officer, of the Institution concerned in writing of this conclusion. Depending on the policy of the Institution concerned, either the Chair, or the Institution’s Academic Registrar/Secretary, or equivalent senior officer, shall in turn inform the candidate of this conclusion, of the candidate’s right of appeal, that an appeal may only be made on the grounds stipulated in paragraph 6 below and that such an appeal must reach the Director of Academic Affairs (Ref: Appeals) within the deadline stipulated in paragraph 5 below; a copy of the Procedure and of the Application Form for Appeal shall be enclosed with that letter which shall be copied to the Director of Academic Affairs of the University of Wales. 4.3  if it transpires that: there were exceptional personal circumstances which could have affected the candidate’s performance adversely, of which the Examining Board was unaware because the candidate did not report them at the appropriate time; the candidate has provided evidence of defects or irregularities in the conduct of the examinations or in written instructions or advice relating thereto of which the Examining Board had been unaware;



the action stipulated in paragraph 4.2 above shall apply. At the same time, the Chair of the Examining Board shall inform the Director of Academic Affairs of the University of Wales in writing of the full circumstances of the case, adding comment where this is considered necessary. Appeal 5. Candidates in University examinations are only entitled to appeal against a decision reached following the above process of verification. Any appeal shall be sent, in full, in writing to the Director of Academic Affairs of the University of Wales (Ref: Appeals) and must reach him/her not later than one month after 117
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the despatch to the candidate of the verification of his/her result. Simple notice of appeal given in writing by a candidate within the above deadline shall not be deemed to constitute an appeal proper and shall not be accepted. The Chair shall, at an Appeal Board meeting, have discretion to declare inadmissible any matter introduced by the appellant, or by any member of staff or student accompanying the appellant, if he/she deems it not directly related to the contents of the appeal previously lodged in writing within the stipulated deadline. 6. The University is only prepared to consider appeals which are based on one or both of the following grounds:

6.1

defects or irregularities in the conduct of the examinations or in written instructions or in advice relating thereto, where there is a prima facie case that such defects, irregularities or advice could have had an adverse effect on the candidate’s performance; exceptional personal circumstances where there is a prima facie case that such circumstances could have had an adverse effect on the candidate’s performance. (In appeals based on these grounds, the appellant must show good reason why such personal circumstances were not made known to the Examining Board before its meeting. Where a candidate could have reported exceptional circumstances to the Examining Board prior to its meeting, those circumstances cannot subsequently be cited as grounds for appeal.)

6.2

7.

Appeals which question the academic judgement of examiners shall not be admissible. Disagreement with the academic judgement of the appointed Examination Board in assessing the merits of an individual piece of work, or in reaching any assessment decision cannot in itself constitute grounds for an academic appeal. On receipt of an appeal the nominee of the Director of Academic Affairs, or his/her nominee, shall acknowledge receipt normally within three working days and, where appropriate to the circumstances of the case, consult the Head of the appellant’s Department or the Chair of the relevant Examining Board. The appeal will then be passed to the Pro-Vice Chancellor (Quality), or his/her nominee*, for consideration. The appellant shall be provided with a written progress report within 25 working days.

8.

9.

The Pro-Vice Chancellor (Quality), or his/her nominee is required to disallow any appeal normally within three months of its receipt: 9.1 9.2 which is based on factors which were known to the Examining Board concerned when the candidate’s result was determined; which introduces information which was known to, and could have been reported by, the candidate prior to the meeting of the Examining Board.

10.

If it is decided by the Pro Vice-Chancellor (Quality) or his/her nominee that there is a prima facie case to be considered, he/ she may choose: 10.1 to refer the case back to the relevant Examining Board for further consideration;



An equivalent senior officer in the University Registry may be nominated by the ProVice-Chancellor (Quality) to act on his/her behalf 118
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to refer the case to a full Appeal Board for decision.

In accordance with Statute 19(5) and Statute 31(1)(g), the Appeal Board shall have delegated powers to act on behalf of the Academic Board and shall consist of three persons, at least two of whom shall be senior members of staff in accredited institutions of the University of Wales.

12.

An appellant shall be offered a personal hearing by the Appeal Board and shall accordingly be informed in advance of the time and date of the meeting. This shall normally be within three months of receipt of the application for appeal. The appellant may be accompanied, but not represented, by a member of the academic or welfare or advisory staff of the Institution concerned or by a student or officer of the Students’ Union at the Institution concerned, but not by any other individual. Any person accompanying an appellant shall be asked by the Board to identify themselves at the beginning of the proceedings and may be invited by the Board during the hearing to speak in support of the case. The appellant may not send another person to an Appeal Board in his/her stead. The Institution concerned shall be invited to send a member of staff to attend the hearing and, at the invitation of the Chair of the Appeal Board, to contribute to the hearing. The Institution Registry shall accordingly be informed in advance of the time and date of the meeting and shall be provided with a copy of the candidate’s application for appeal.

13.

14.

The Appeal Board shall base its decision on the evidence of the appellant’s submission and the testimony of the Chair of the Examining Board concerned, together with any further evidence which it considers relevant.

15.

The decision of the Appeal Board shall be notified by the Director of Academic Affairs or his/her nominee as soon as possible to the appellant, the Chair of the Examining Board and the Academic Registrar/Secretary, or equivalent senior officer, of the Institution concerned.

16.

The Appeal Board shall be empowered to take either of the following decisions: 16.1 16.2 that the appeal be rejected and no further action be taken; that the matter be referred back to the relevant Examining Board.

In exceptional cases only, the Appeal Board may specify the composition of the Examining Board. Where the case is referred back to the Examining Board, the Appeal Board may, where appropriate to the circumstances of the case, require an officer of the University of Wales Registry to attend as observer the meeting of the Examining Board. 17. In the case of 16.1 above, the decision of the Appeal Board shall be final and the matter shall, therefore, be regarded as closed. There shall be no discussion of the decision of the Appeal Board with the appellant or any other person. 119
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18.

In the case of 10.1 and 16.2 above, a full report, including recommendations or advice where appropriate to the circumstances of the case - including all supporting documentation - shall be sent by the Director of Academic Affairs or his/her nominee to the Chair of the Examining Board and shall be considered by the Examining Board. The decision of the Examining Board, together with a copy of a relevant extract from its minutes, shall be sent by the Chair of the Examining Board to the Director of Academic Affairs or his/her nominee within six working weeks of the date of the appeal hearing. The Examining Board’s decision on whether any adjustment should be made to marks or grades previously awarded shall be reported back to the Appeal Board and shall be final. On receipt of this material, the Director of Academic Affairs or his/her nominee may, in exceptional cases only, refer the case to the Chair of the Appeal Board for review of the procedures followed. If it transpires that a serious procedural irregularity has occurred, the case may be referred back to the relevant Examining Board for reconsideration. An Examining Board’s decision on whether or not to adjust marks or grades previously awarded may or may not alter the appellant’s overall examination result. If the overall result is altered, the Chair of the Examining Board shall arrange for the University to publish any supplementary pass-list which may be necessary. The Director of Academic Affairs, or his/her nominee, shall inform the appellant in writing of the decision of the Examining Board, and of the reasons for the decision. If, following a successful appeal, the Examining Board decides that a candidate has qualified for a degree, such a candidate shall be admitted to that degree at the next succeeding Degree Congregation. Alternatively, the Vice-Chancellor shall have authority to deem such a candidate to have been admitted to the degree provided all other necessary conditions for his/her admission have been met.

19.

20.

21.

The Vice-Chancellor shall also have authority to deem a candidate who has already been admitted to a degree to have been admitted to a different class of degree if, following a successful appeal, an Examining Board decides that the candidate’s degree classification shall be amended. In such cases, the Director of Academic Affairs or his/her nominee shall issue a replacement certificate upon the return by the candidate of the original certificate.

22.

Where applicable, appropriate arrangements will be made in respect of candidates who, following a successful appeal, are deemed by an Examining Board to have qualified for the award of a certificate or diploma. The Appeal Board may make recommendations for consideration by the Academic Board or by the institution concerned as appropriate on any matter arising from the consideration of appeals. Pursuant to the Higher Education Act 2004, the Office of the Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education (the OIA) has been designated by the National Assembly for Wales from 1 January 2005 as the operator of an independent scheme in Wales for the review of student complaints. Once all the relevant University of Wales procedures above have been exhausted a candidate may submit a complaint to the OIA. Any such complaint must be submitted by sending a completed Scheme Application Form together with all relevant information to the OIA within three months of the date on the “Completion of Procedures Letter” from the University of Wales upon completion of its internal procedures. A Scheme Application Form can be obtained from the University of Wales Registry (Ref: Appeals), downloaded from the OIA website www.oiahe.org.uk or by telephoning or writing to the OIA. The contact details for the OIA are as follows: OIAHE, 5th Floor, Thames Tower, Station Road, Reading, RG1 1LX Tel: 0118 959 9813 120
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23. 24.

Email: enquiries@oiahe.org.

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APPENDIX C - UNFAIR PRACTICE PROCEDURE Applicable to Unfair Practice in any Assessed Component contributing to an Award of the University of Wales. Scope of this Procedure This Procedure shall apply to allegations of unfair practice on any assessed component contributing to an award of the University of Wales at any Collaborative Partner Institution. Where an allegation of unfair practice arises at any time after an individual has been admitted to a degree of the University of Wales, or after a Diploma, Licence or other academic award of the University of Wales has been conferred and granted, the allegation will be considered by the Academic Board of the University of Wales. The Academic Board shall have the power to deprive the individual of the degree or to revoke such a Diploma, Licence or other academic award [Statute 19 (3) and (4)]. Throughout this document, the term “Superintendent of Examinations” shall include a Superintendent of Assessment or other equivalent designated officer. 1. Definition of Unfair Practice It is an unfair practice to commit any act whereby a person may obtain for himself/herself or for another, an unpermitted advantage. This shall apply whether the candidate acts alone or in conjunction with another/others. Any action or actions shall be deemed to fall within this definition whether occurring during, or in relation to, a formal examination, a piece of coursework, or any form of assessment undertaken in pursuit of a qualification of the University of Wales. The University of Wales has distinct procedures and penalties for dealing with unfair practice in examination or non-examination conditions. Without prejudice to the generality of the foregoing, examples of unfair practice are shown below. These examples are not exhaustive and other cases may fall within the general definition of unfair practice.

2.

Examples of Unfair Practice in Non-Examination Conditions

(i) Plagiarism, which can be defined as using without acknowledgement another person’s words or ideas and submitting them for assessment as though it were one’s own work, for instance by copying, translating from one language to another or unacknowledged paraphrasing. Further examples of plagiarism are given below:



Use of any quotation(s) from the published or unpublished work of other persons, whether published in textbooks, articles, the Web, or in any other format, which quotations have not been clearly identified as such by being placed in quotation marks and acknowledged. Use of another person’s words or ideas that has been slightly changed or paraphrased to make it look different from the original. Summarising another person’s ideas, judgements, diagrams, figures, or computer programs without reference to that person in the text and the source in the bibliography. Use of services of essay banks and/or any other agencies. Use of unacknowledged material downloaded from the Internet.





 

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 (ii)

Re-use of one’s own material except as authorised by the department.

Collusion, which can be defined as when work that has been undertaken by or with others is submitted and passed off as solely the work of one person. This also applies where the work of one candidate is submitted in the name of another. Where this is done with the knowledge of the originator both parties can be considered to be at fault. Fabrication of data, making false claims to have carried out experiments, observations, interviews or other forms of data collection and analysis, or acting dishonestly in any other way. Presentation of evidence of special circumstances to Examining Boards, which evidence is false or falsified or which in any way misleads or could mislead Examining Boards.

(iii)

(iv) 3.

Examples of Unfair Practice in Examination Conditions (i) Introduction into an examination room and/or associated facilities any unauthorised form of materials such as a book, manuscript, data or loose papers, information obtained via any electronic device, or any source of unauthorised information. Copying from or communication with any other person in the examination room and/or associated facilities except as authorised by an invigilator. Communication electronically with any other person, except as authorised by an invigilator. Impersonation of an examination candidate or allowing oneself to be impersonated. Presentation of an examination script as one’s own work when the script includes material produced by unauthorised means. Presentation of evidence of special circumstances to Examining Boards, which evidence is false or falsified or which in any way misleads or could mislead Examining Boards.

(ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) 4. 4.1

Unfair Practice in a Formal Examination - Initial Stages Unfair Practice in the Examination Room Where it is considered or suspected that a candidate is engaging in unfair practice, the candidate shall be informed, preferably in the presence of a witness, that the circumstances will be reported. The candidate shall, however, be allowed to continue the examination and any subsequent examination(s) without prejudice to any decision, which may be taken. Failure to give such a warning shall not, however, prejudice subsequent proceedings. Where appropriate, the invigilator shall confiscate and retain evidence relating to any alleged unfair examination practice, so that it is available to any subsequent investigation. The invigilator shall as soon as possible report the circumstances orally, in the first instance and thereafter in writing, with any evidence retained, to the Examinations Officer who shall in turn notify the Chair of the relevant Examining Board and the Superintendent of Examinations. In the case of an unseen written test contributing to the final module result, which is conducted under the aegis of the department, the invigilator should report the case to the Head of Department in the first instance, who in turn shall report the case to the Superintendent of Examinations.

4.2

Suspected Unfair Practice Detected During or Subsequent to the Marking Period An internal or external examiner or any other person who, whether in the course of the marking period or subsequently, considers or suspects that a candidate has engaged in an unfair practice, shall report the matter in writing to the Chair of the relevant Examining Board as soon as possible. The Chair shall retain any relevant evidence and shall forthwith report the matter in writing to the Superintendent of 123
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Examinations. The Superintendent of Examinations shall then take the action prescribed below. 4.3 Further Action to be taken by the Superintendent of Examinations On receipt of a report concerning an allegation of unfair practice, the Superintendent of Examinations shall discuss the matter with the Chair of the relevant Examining Board to determine whether, in the light of all the circumstances, a prima facie case has been established. If it is decided that no further action against the candidate should be taken, the Chair of the relevant Examining Board shall, where appropriate, inform the candidate in writing that the matter is closed. If satisfied that such a case exists, the Superintendent shall report the case in writing to the Academic Registrar/Secretary or other designated officer and shall send to him/her copies of any relevant supporting evidence. The procedure shown shall then operate as described. The candidate shall be informed in writing by the institution’s Academic Registry of the allegation, and that a Committee of Enquiry will be constituted to consider the case. The candidate’s attention shall be drawn to the appropriate regulations/procedures in the relevant institution’s publication(s). 5. 5.1 Unfair Practice in Work Completed Under Non-examinable Conditions - Initial Stages If a member of staff considers, or suspects, that unfair practice has occurred in relation to work submitted as a piece of coursework, or any work completed under non-examination conditions, he/she shall report the matter in writing to the Chair of the relevant Examining Board, normally within five working days. The Chair of the Examining Board shall first decide whether there is a prima facie case for treating the matter as a case of unfair practice by referring to documentation. The Chair may also consult with the relevant external examiner(s). Relevant means of arriving at such a decision may be employed, for instance through the use of plagiarism detection software. If the Chair of the Examining Board believes that a prima facie case exists, the Chair shall inform the Head of Department, who will inform the Academic Registrar/Secretary or other designated officer of the institution concerned. If no case exists, and the candidate is aware of the investigation, the candidate shall be informed that the matter is closed. 5.3 If a case exists the candidate shall be informed by the Academic Registrar/Secretary or other designated officer of the institution concerned of the allegation. The candidate’s attention shall be drawn to the appropriate regulations/procedures of the University of Wales. (i) (ii) The candidate shall also be informed that a Committee of Enquiry will be constituted to consider the case. Where the allegation concerns alleged unfair practice in work totalling 20 credits or fewer, which was completed under non-examinable conditions, the candidate shall be informed by the Academic Registrar/Secretary or other designated officer of the institution that he/she may elect either for the matter to be heard by a Committee of Enquiry or for the matter to be dealt with by the Examining Board (according to the practice within the institution concerned) subject to the final paragraph of 5.3 (iii) below. If the Examining Board indicates that it may be more appropriate for a case to be heard by a Committee of Enquiry, a case shall be presented to the Academic Registrar/Secretary or other designated officer. Such instances shall include a second offence, an extremely serious case which may in the view of the Examining Board result in a serious penalty or where impartiality may be compromised.

5.2

(iii)

6

Establishment of the Committee of Enquiry to deal with cases of Unfair Practice 124
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6.1

Each institution shall establish a Standing Panel for the purpose of investigating allegations of unfair practice in University examinations. The Panel shall consist of members of the contracted academic staff of the institution, chosen so as to be representative of the Faculties/Schools at that Institution. On receipt of an allegation of unfair practice submitted by a Superintendent of Examinations, the Academic Registrar/Secretary or other designated officer of the institution concerned shall arrange for an appropriate Committee of Enquiry to be convened as soon as possible, normally within 6 working weeks of the allegation being made, and for a member of the institution’s Academic Registry to act as Secretary to the Committee. The Superintendent of Examinations, who shall present the case against the candidate, shall not act as Secretary to the Committee. Each Committee of Enquiry shall normally consist of 3 members selected by the Academic Registrar/Secretary (or his/her nominee) from the Standing Panel. Whenever possible the Committee of Enquiry shall not contain members of staff from a department in which the student is studying. If that is not possible, one of the three members may be external to the institution concerned. The Chair of the Committee of Enquiry shall be designated by the Academic Registrar from amongst the three members of the Standing Panel. An independent person may be appointed as an additional member of the Committee at the discretion of the institution concerned. All institutions, shall invite the Director of Validation Services of the University of Wales or his/her nominee to attend, as an observer, all meetings of the Committee of Enquiry. The Academic Registry of the institution concerned shall supply to the University details of the allegations of unfair practice and any other information relevant to the meeting of the Committee of Enquiry. The University of Wales reserves the right to send a member of staff to attend as observer meetings of a Committee of Enquiry of any institution where the unfair practice is alleged to have been committed on an assessed component contributing to a University of Wales award. Meetings of Committees of Enquiry shall normally be held on a campus of the institution concerned unless alternative regulations have been agreed such as a Collaborative Partner's campus. As soon as reasonably practicable after the appointment of the Committee of Enquiry and bearing in mind the University of Wales’ expectation that such cases should be heard normally within 6 working weeks of the allegation being communicated to the candidate, the Secretary of the Committee shall: (i) notify the Superintendent of Examinations and members of the Committee of Enquiry of the date, place and time of the meeting and supply them with copies of the allegation and of any statements or documents; inform the candidate of the date, place and time when the Committee of Enquiry intends to meet and that he/she has the right to be represented or accompanied, to hear all the evidence, to call and question witnesses and to submit other evidence, including evidence of mitigating circumstances; send to the candidate copies of statements of witnesses and of documents to be placed before the Committee of Enquiry, and offer the candidate an opportunity to indicate any statement or documents which may be in dispute.

6.2

6.3

6.4

6.5

6.6 6.7

(ii)

(iii)

6.8

Documentary evidence shall be sent by the candidate to the Academic Registrar/Secretary or other designated officer prior to the date of the meeting and circulated to members of the Committee. Any further evidence made available on the date of the meeting may be presented to the Committee but only with the express permission of the Chair. The candidate shall be required to inform the Secretary whether or not he/she intends to attend the meeting of the Committee of Enquiry. If the candidate indicates that he/she does not wish to attend the meeting, the Committee of Enquiry shall proceed in his/her absence. In such a case the student can elect to be represented at the meeting. Where no response is received from the candidate, there may be one postponement of the Committee of Enquiry pending investigation (e.g. to establish whether the 125
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6.9

candidate has received the communications). 6.10 The candidate will be notified of his/her entitlement to be represented or accompanied by a friend, adviser or representative who may speak on their behalf but may not be a solicitor or barrister acting in a professional capacity. Any person accompanying and/or representing the candidate shall be asked by the Board to identify themselves at the beginning of the proceedings and may be invited by the Board during the hearing to speak in reference to the case. A candidate who intends to be accompanied and/or represented shall inform the Secretary of the name of the person accompanying and/or representing him/her in writing in advance of the meeting. Should a candidate not attend the meeting of the Committee of Enquiry, having previously indicated to the Secretary that he/she would attend, and provided that all reasonable means have been taken to contact the candidate, the meeting shall proceed in his/her absence. Functions of the Committee The functions of the Committee of Enquiry shall be: (i) (ii) (iii) 8 8.1 to consider the evidence submitted to it on the allegation of unfair practice; to determine whether the allegation has been substantiated. Such a determination shall normally be made on the balance of probabilities; to determine, in appropriate cases, the penalty to be imposed.

6.11

7

Procedure during the meeting In cases where two or more candidates are accused of related offences, such as in the case of collusion, the Chair may decide to deal with the cases together. However, each candidate shall be given the opportunity to request that the cases be heard separately. The Superintendent of Examinations shall present the case against the candidate, calling such witnesses and presenting such evidence as the Superintendent thinks fit. Additional documentary evidence in support of the case against the student may only be presented to the Committee on the day of the hearing, with the express permission of the Chair. The Superintendent may question both the candidate and witnesses. The candidate may question the witnesses called by the Superintendent of Examinations. The candidate shall have the right to be represented or accompanied, to hear all the evidence brought against him/her, to call and to question witnesses, and to submit other evidence. Additional documentary evidence including evidence of mitigating circumstances may only be presented to the Committee on the day of the hearing, with the express permission of the Chair. The Chair may invite contributions from the person accompanying the student. Members of the Committee of Enquiry may ask questions of the candidate, the Superintendent of Examinations and of the witnesses. Witnesses shall be concerned only with evidence relating directly to the allegation and shall normally withdraw after questioning. The Chair may wish to consider allowing witnesses to remain in the hearing throughout the submission of evidence. The agreement of both parties to this shall be obtained. When the submission of evidence and the questioning of witnesses are completed, all persons, other than the members of the Committee, the Secretary and observers from the institution’s Academic Registry and/or the University of Wales Registry, if present, shall withdraw. The Chair of the Committee may approve an adjournment of the hearing following a reasonable request from any party. 126
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8.2

8.3 8.4

8.5 8.6

8.7

8.8

8.9

The Committee of Enquiry shall then consider whether the allegation has been substantiated. The Committee would not normally be required to prove intent on the part of the candidate to engage in an act of unfair practice in order to substantiate the allegation, but additional proof of intent may be relevant to the Committee in arriving at an appropriate penalty. The Committee of Enquiry shall not normally be informed, before reaching its verdict on the allegation under consideration, of any evidence of previously substantiated allegations of unfair practice. The Committee shall however be so informed before determining the penalty in appropriate cases. In exceptional cases, evidence of previous substantiated acts of unfair practice may be disclosed prior to the verdict of the Committee where such evidence: (i) (ii) rebuts a claim of previous good character made by the candidate/representative; is relevant to the allegation under consideration (other than merely showing that the candidate had a disposition to commit the facts alleged) and that its prejudicial effect does not outweigh its probative value.

8.10

8.11

If the Committee finds that the case has been substantiated, it shall then consider the penalty to be imposed. Penalties are divided into: (i) (ii) (iii) penalties available for unfair practice in examination conditions; penalties available for unfair practice under non-examination conditions; penalties for unfair practice by candidates for research degrees.

8.12

When determining the penalty to be imposed, the Committee shall consider the candidate’s record, including profile of marks, and any assessment conventions and regulations for the scheme of study in question. The Committee should also consult any guidelines issued on the appropriateness of penalties for different levels of offences. If the Committee finds that the case has not been substantiated the candidate shall be informed of the outcome in writing. All record of the case shall be removed from the student’s file. Penalties available to the Committee for Unfair Practice in Examination Conditions

8.13 9.

The Committee of Enquiry shall apply one or any combination of the following penalties: 9.1 9.2 The issue of a formal reprimand to the candidate, a written record of which shall be kept. The cancellation of the candidate’s marks in part or in whole for module(s) concerned, or in all of the modules for the year in question or the equivalent for a part-time candidate, with a recommendation as to whether or not a re-assessment should be permitted, either with eligibility for the bare pass mark only or for the full range of marks. The reduction of the degree result by one class or the non-award of a distinction, as appropriate. The disqualification of the candidate from any future University of Wales examination. If a Committee of Enquiry decides that the above penalties are inappropriate, the Committee may use its discretion to decide upon the appropriate penalty. In exceptional circumstances where an allegation has been substantiated and the Committee is concerned that this may affect the candidate’s ability to practise in a particular profession, the case shall also be considered under the institution’s procedure for Unprofessional Conduct and Unfitness to Practise. 10. Penalties Available to the Committee for Unfair Practice in Non-Examination Conditions 127
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9.3 9.4

The Committee of Enquiry shall apply one or any combination of the following penalties: 10.1 10.2 10.3 The issue of a formal reprimand to the candidate, a written record of which shall be kept. An instruction to the examiners, when marking, to ignore any plagiarized text, which may result in a reduced mark. The cancellation of the candidate’s marks in part or in whole for module(s) concerned, or in all of the modules for the year in question or the equivalent for a part-time candidate, with a recommendation as to whether or not a re-assessment should be permitted, either with eligibility for the bare pass mark only or for the full range of marks. The reduction of the degree result by one class or the non-award of a distinction, as appropriate. The disqualification of the candidate from any future University examination. If a Committee of Enquiry decides that the above penalties are inappropriate, the Committee may use its discretion to decide upon the appropriate penalty. In exceptional circumstances where an allegation has been substantiated and the Committee is concerned that this may affect the candidate’s ability to practise in a particular profession, the case shall also be considered under the institution’s procedure for Unprofessional Conduct and Unfitness to Practise. 11 Penalties for Unfair Practice in Research Degrees The Committee of Enquiry shall apply one or any combination of the following penalties: 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 The issue of a formal reprimand to the candidate, a written record of which shall be kept. The disqualification of the candidate from the degree with a right to resubmit the thesis. The disqualification of the candidate from the degree with no right to resubmit the thesis. The disqualification of the candidate from all future University of Wales examinations and qualifications. If a Committee of Enquiry decides that the above penalties are inappropriate, the Committee may use its discretion to decide upon the appropriate penalty. In exceptional circumstances where an allegation has been substantiated and the Committee is concerned that this may affect the candidate’s ability to practise in a particular profession, the case shall also be considered under the institution’s procedure for Unprofessional Conduct and Unfitness to Practise. 12 12.1 Action to be taken following the Committee of Enquiry Where the candidate has received a formal reprimand, the Committee may recommend that the candidate should receive advice from an appropriate member of staff, in order to make clear the reasons for the Committee’s decision and to ensure that the cause of the action (e.g. unintentional plagiarism) is discussed with the student to ensure that any future repeat offence by him/her cannot then be classed as ‘inadvertent’. When the Committee of Enquiry has investigated the facts of the alleged unfair practice the Secretary shall in his/her report state whether or not the allegation has been substantiated and the penalty imposed where appropriate. The report shall be submitted, to the Academic Registrar/Secretary or other designated officer of the institution as soon as possible after the Enquiry has been completed. If the finding of the Enquiry is that a case has not been substantiated, the Chair of the Committee of Enquiry may inform the candidate orally of this. Irrespective of whether or not the candidate is informed 128
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10.4 10.5

12.2

12.3

orally, the Academic Registrar/Secretary or other designated officer of the institution concerned shall notify the candidate formally in writing of the Committee of Enquiry’s findings and that the matter is therefore closed. 12.4 If the finding of the Enquiry is that the allegation has been substantiated, the Chair of the Committee of Enquiry may inform the candidate orally, but there shall be no discussion of the Committee’s decision with the candidate. Irrespective of whether or not the candidate is informed orally, the Academic Registrar/Secretary or other designated officer of the institution concerned shall inform the candidate of the findings and the penalty imposed as soon as possible. The penalty shall be recorded on the student’s record. At the same time, the Academic Registrar/Secretary or other designated officer of the institution concerned shall send to the Director of Academic Affairs (Ref: Unfair Practice) of the University of Wales a copy of the report on the Committee of Enquiry and a copy of the letter sent to the candidate informing him/her of the decision and the penalty imposed, where appropriate. The Academic Registrar/Secretary or other designated officer of the institution concerned shall further inform the candidate of his/her right of appeal to the University of Wales. Any such appeal shall be sent, in full, in writing to the Director of Academic Affairs (Ref: Appeals) of the University of Wales and must reach him/her not later than one month after dispatch to the candidate by the institution of the Committee’s decision. The address to which any such correspondence shall be sent is shown in the Appendix to this Procedure. Where the allegation has been substantiated, the Academic Registrar/Secretary or other designated officer of the institution shall require the Examining Board concerned to determine the candidate’s overall examination result in the light of the penalty imposed by the Committee of Enquiry. If the Committee of Enquiry has decided that the mark obtained for the unit of assessment in which unfair practice has occurred shall be cancelled, the Examining Board shall award a mark of zero for the unit and shall then determine the candidate’s overall result. Normally, the University will not make any public pronouncements of decisions of Committees of Enquiry. However, a candidate, in respect of whom a determination has been made, shall have the right to require the institution concerned to publish any determination should the candidate so wish, and the institution shall maintain a record of all such cases, which will be available to the public on request. Examination Pass-Lists The Vice-Chancellor or his/her nominee, in consultation with the Chair of the Examining Board, shall arrange for the publication of such supplementary pass-list as may be necessary. If a case of alleged unfair practice is under investigation at the time of the meeting of the relevant Examining Board, the Board shall defer consideration of the candidate’s work until the Committee of Enquiry has made a decision on the case and the decision has been conveyed to the Chair of the Examining Board. Should a case be under investigation when a pass-list is due for completion and publication, the name of the candidate concerned shall be withheld from the pass-list and a supplementary pass-list issued as appropriate. An Examining Board shall also have authority to cancel a result previously published and to publish a supplementary pass-list, if a case of unfair practice arises subsequent to the publication of the original pass-list. Appeal to the University of Wales Details of the relevant Appeals Procedure are given in the Appendix to this Procedure. 15. Report to the Academic Board of the University of Wales 129
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12.5

12.6

12.7

12.8

13. 13.1 13.2

13.3

13.4

14.

The Secretary to the Academic Board or his/her nominee shall submit a report on the outcome of each case of unfair practice considered in accordance with the procedure set out above to the next available meeting of the Academic Board of the University of Wales. _____________________________________________________________________ APPENDIX Appeals by candidates found guilty of unfair practice The following procedure does not apply in the case of candidates who have elected to have their case dealt with by the Examining Board concerned (under paragraph 5.3 (ii) of the Unfair Practice Procedure, above) rather than by a Committee of Enquiry. Such candidates are advised that, instead, they may have recourse to appeal against the decision of the Examining Board under the University's separate Verification and Appeals Procedure. Copies of this procedure are available upon request from the University Registry, or may be accessed through the University of Wales' website (www.wales.ac.uk). 1 The University is only prepared to consider appeals which are based on one or both of the following grounds: 1.1 irregularities in the conduct of the unfair practice procedure, which are of such a nature as to cause reasonable doubt whether the Committee would have reached the same decision had they not occurred; exceptional personal circumstances which were not known to the Committee of Enquiry when the candidate’s case was considered and which can be shown to be relevant to the unfair practice. (In appeals based on these grounds the appellant must show good reason why such personal circumstances were not made known to the Committee of Enquiry before its meeting. Where a candidate could have reported exceptional personal circumstances to the Committee of Enquiry prior to its meeting, those circumstances cannot subsequently be cited as grounds for appeal.)

1.2

2

Any appeal against a decision of a Committee of Enquiry (including any penalty imposed) shall be sent in full, in writing to the Director of Academic Affairs (Ref: Appeals), University of Wales Registry, King Edward VII Avenue, Cathays Park, Cardiff CF10 3NS, and must reach him/her not later than one month after despatch to the candidate of the Committee’s decision. Simple notice of appeal given in writing by a candidate within the above deadline shall not be deemed to constitute an appeal proper and shall not be accepted. The Chair shall, at an Appeal Board meeting, have discretion to declare inadmissible any matter introduced by the appellant, or by any member of staff or student accompanying the appellant, if he/she deems it not directly related to the contents of the appeal previously lodged in writing within the stipulated deadline. On receipt of an appeal, the Director of Academic Affairs or his/her nominee shall acknowledge receipt normally within three working days and, where appropriate to the circumstances of the case, consult the Chair of the Committee of Enquiry and/or the Academic Registrar/Secretary, or equivalent senior officer in the institution concerned. The appeal will then be passed to the Pro Vice-Chancellor (Quality), or his/her nominee2, for consideration. The appellant shall be provided with a written progress report within 25 working days. The Pro Vice-Chancellor (Quality), or his/her nominee, is required to disallow an appeal normally within three months of its receipt: 4.1 which is based on factors which were known to the Committee of Enquiry when the penalty

3

4

2

An equivalent senior officer in the University Registry may be nominated by the Pro Vice-Chancellor (Quality) to act on his/her behalf. 130
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was imposed; 4.2 5 which introduces information which was known to, and could have been reported by, the candidate prior to the meeting of the Committee of Enquiry.

If it is decided by the Pro Vice-Chancellor or his/her nominee that there is a prima facie case to be considered, he/she may choose: 5.1 5.2 to refer the case back to the relevant Examining Board for further consideration; to refer the case to a full Appeal Board for decision.

6

In accordance with Statute 19(5) and Statute 31(1)(g) the Appeal Board shall have delegated powers to act on behalf of the Academic Board and shall consist of three persons, at least two of whom shall be senior members of staff in accredited institutions of the University of Wales. An appellant shall be offered a personal hearing by the Appeal Board and shall accordingly be informed in advance of the time and date of the meeting. The appellant may be accompanied by a member of the academic or welfare or advisory staff of the Institution concerned or by a student or officer of the Students’ Union at the Institution concerned, but not by any other individual. The appellant may not send any other person to an Appeal Board in his/her stead. The Institution concerned shall be invited to send a member of staff to attend the hearing and, at the invitation of the Chair of the Appeal Board, to contribute to the hearing. The Institution Registry shall accordingly be informed in advance of the time and date of the meeting and shall be provided with a copy of the candidate’s application for appeal. The Appeal Board shall base its decision on the evidence of the appellant’s submission and the testimony of the Chair of the Committee of Enquiry concerned, together with any further evidence which it considers relevant. The decision of the Appeal Board, and recommendations or advice where appropriate to the circumstances of the case, shall be conveyed by the Director of Academic Affairs of the University, or his/her nominee as soon as possible to the appellant, the Chair of the Committee of Enquiry and to the Academic Registrar/Secretary, or equivalent senior officer, of the Institution concerned. The Appeal Board shall be empowered to take one of the following decisions: 11.1 11.2 11.3 to reject the appeal; to disallow the original penalty and to refer the case back to the original Committee of Enquiry for a review of the penalty imposed; to require a new Committee of Enquiry to re-hear the case.

7

8

9

10

11

12 Where a new Committee of Enquiry is required to re-hear a case, the membership of that Committee must be entirely different from that of the previous Committee. The new Committee shall not be provided with any evidence of any penalty imposed by the previous Committee, or of any other matter discussed by the previous Committee or Appeal Board, other than that it is re-hearing a case on appeal. An obligation to hear the case on the basis of the facts presented before them at the hearing and not in the light of anything that they may have heard or discovered outside the Committee, shall be framed within any Terms of Reference applying to the Committee members. 13 The decision of the Appeal Board shall be final, and the matter shall, therefore, be regarded as closed. There shall be no discussion of the decision of the Appeal Board with the appellant or any other person. 131
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14

If an appeal is upheld, the Vice-Chancellor or his/her nominee, in consultation with the Chair of the Examining Board, shall then arrange for the publication of such supplementary pass-list as may be necessary. If, as a consequence of a successful appeal, a candidate is regarded as having qualified for a degree, such a candidate shall be admitted to that degree at the next succeeding Degree Congregation. Alternatively, the Vice-Chancellor shall have authority to deem such a candidate to have been admitted to his/her degree provided all other necessary conditions for his/her admission have been met. The Vice-Chancellor shall also have authority to deem a candidate who has already been admitted to a degree to have been admitted to a different class of degree if, following a successful appeal, the Examining Board decides that the candidate’s degree classification shall be amended. In such cases, the University shall issue a replacement certificate upon the return by the candidate of the original certificate. Where applicable, appropriate arrangements will be made in respect of candidates who, following successful appeal, are deemed by an Examining Board to have qualified for the award of a certificate or diploma. The Appeal Board may make recommendations for consideration by the Regulations and Special Cases Committee (Validated Provision) or the Academic Board as appropriate on any matters arising from the consideration of appeals. Pursuant to the Higher Education Act 2004, the Office of the Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education (the OIA) has been designated by the National Assembly for Wales from 1 January 2005 as the operator of an independent scheme in Wales for the review of student complaints. Once all the relevant University of Wales procedures above have been exhausted a candidate may submit a complaint to the OIA. Any such complaint must be submitted by sending a completed Scheme Application Form together with all relevant information to the OIA within three months of the date on the “Completion of Procedures Letter” from the University of Wales upon completion of its internal procedures. A Scheme Application Form can be obtained from the University of Wales Registry (Ref Appeals), downloaded from the OIA website www.oiahe.org.uk or by telephoning or writing to the OIA. The contact details for the OIA are as follows: OIAHE, 5th Floor, Thames Tower, Station Road, Reading, RG1 1LX Tel: 0118 959 9813 Email: enquiries@oiahe.org.uk

15

16

17

18

19

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APPENDIX D - STUDENT COMPLAINTS PROCEDURE This procedure applies to: Complaints arising from a student’s educational experience, other than disputes relating to assessment and examinations (see below); Complaints in respect of academic and/or administrative support or other services provided by a validated institution or the University of Wales; Complaints regarding alleged harassment by staff of the validated institution or of the University of Wales; Complaints arising from alleged discrimination by staff of the validated institution or of the University of Wales in relation to gender, race, disability, sexual orientation or otherwise. This list is not exhaustive – complaints falling outside those listed above will be considered and investigated at the discretion the Chair of the Validation Board. The investigation of formal complaints relating to matters which have occurred more than twelve months previously will be investigated at the discretion the University. This procedure does not apply to: Candidates wishing to appeal against an academic decision – separate procedures exist for such appeals. Candidates should also note that appeals against the academic judgement of examiners cannot be accepted; Disciplinary matters – these should be dealt with in accordance with separate procedures in place within the validated institution, though complaints will be accepted against the disciplinary procedure process and/or outcome; Fitness to Practise issues - these should be dealt with in accordance with the University of Wales Fitness to Practise Procedure (Collaborative Partner Institutions). 2. SUBMISSION OF A COMPLAINT All correspondence regarding complaints, including submission of complaints and informal advice regarding complaints, should be submitted to: University of Wales Validation Unit King Edward VII Avenue Cathays Park CARDIFF CF10 3NS (email: studentcomplaints@wales.ac.uk) All student complaints relating to validated provision shall be considered by a designated member of the Validation Board. If necessary, the designated member of the Validation Board considering the case shall have access to appropriate legal advice. 3. STAGE ONE

In order to make a formal complaint, the student concerned should submit the attached Complaints Form and attach any supporting evidence to: the University of Wales Validation Unit (ref: Student Complaints) at the address above. The Form can be submitted electronically, though certified copies of documents (e.g. medical certificates) may be requested. Should a student prefer the complaint to remain anonymous and it is feasible to do so, the Validation Unit shall seek to respect the student’s wishes. The Validation Unit will confirm receipt of the complaint to the student normally within 5 working days and will liaise with the designated member of the Validation Board regarding the complaint. The Validation Unit shall contact the Institution concerned and request a response to the complaint, to be received by the Validation Unit normally within 10 working days. Copies of the initial complaint and Institution’s response shall be forwarded to the designated member of the Validation Board for consideration. The designated member of the Validation Board considering the case will liaise with colleagues in the Validation Unit to formulate a written response to the complaint, normally within 10 working days of the complaint being received by the Validation Unit. The response, and details of any action to be taken in the light of the complaint, will be sent by the Validation Unit to the student and to the Institution. 133
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The outcomes available are as follows: (a) Complaint not upheld. (b) Complaint upheld in whole or in part. (c) In the event of a complaint being upheld in whole or in part, recommendations should be made in respect of remedial action required. A response may be required from the institution concerned, within a set timeframe. Alternatively, the designated member of the Validation Board considering the case may decide that a meeting with the student and/or representatives of the Institution is necessary. In such instances, the Validation Unit shall make the necessary arrangements and a Validation Unit staff member will join the designated Validation Board member considering the case at the meeting. The meeting shall be held via telephone or videoconference if necessary. In the event of a meeting being held, the student and Institution shall have access to all relevant documentation relating to the complaint. The student may be accompanied, but not represented, by a member of the academic or welfare or advisory staff of the Institution concerned or by a student or officer of the Students’ Union at the Institution concerned, but not by any other individual. Any person accompanying a complainant shall be asked by the member of the Board considering the case to identify themselves at the beginning of the meeting and may be invited during the hearing to speak in relation to the case. The appellant may not send another person to a hearing in his/her stead. The outcomes available are as follows: (a) Complaint not upheld. (b) Complaint upheld in whole or in part. (c) In the event of a complaint being upheld in whole or in part, recommendations should be made in respect of remedial action required. A response may be required from the institution concerned, within a set timeframe. Following a meeting, the designated member of the Validation Board considering the case will liaise with staff in the Validation Unit to formulate a written response to the complaint, normally within 10 working days of the meeting taking place. The response, and details of any action to be taken in the light of the complaint, will be sent by the Validation Unit to the student and to the Institution. 4. STAGE TWO: APPEAL AGAINST OUTCOME

If a student is not satisfied with the outcome of the Stage One investigation of the complaint, he/she may submit an appeal against the outcome within 10 working days of the written judgement being issued by the Validation Unit. This should not be confused with an academic appeal. The appeal should be submitted to the Vice Chancellor, c/o the University of Wales Registry, King Edward VII Avenue, Cathays Park, Cardiff, CF10 3NS (ref: Student Complaint), and should indicate in writing why the response to the complaint is not satisfactory. Taking into account all the previous attempts at resolution, the Vice Chancellor (or his/her nominee) will decide whether a further complaint hearing is required, and will normally communicate his/her decision to the student within 10 working days of the appeal against the outcome being received. Should such a complaint hearing be required, it will be chaired by the Vice Chancellor or his/her nominee with two senior academic or administrative members of staff of accredited or affiliated institutions of the University of Wales who are unrelated to the complaint. A member of staff from the University Registry will act as

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secretary to the Panel. The complaints hearing will normally meet within one calendar month of the appeal against the outcome being received. The student (and if deemed necessary staff from the institution) will be invited to any meeting but the meeting shall be held via telephone or videoconference if necessary. In the event of a meeting being held, the student (and if deemed necessary the institution) shall have access to all relevant documentation relating to the complaint. The student may be accompanied, but not represented, by a member of the academic or welfare or advisory staff of the Institution concerned or by a student or officer of the Students’ Union at the Institution concerned, but not by any other individual. Any person accompanying the appellant shall be asked by the Board to identify themselves at the beginning of the proceedings and may be invited by the Board during the hearing to speak in support of the case. The appellant may not send another person to a hearing in his/her stead. The outcomes available are as follows: (a) Complaint not upheld. (b) Complaint upheld in whole or in part (c) In the event of a complaint being upheld in whole or in part, recommendations should be made in respect of remedial action required. A response may be required from the institution concerned, within a set timeframe. Following a meeting, Panel members will liaise with staff in the University Registry to formulate a written response to the complaint *, normally within 10 working days of the meeting taking place. The written response to the complaint, and details of any action to be taken in the light of the complaint, will be sent by the University Registry to the student and to the Institution. [* Completion of Procedures Letter] 5. STAGE THREE: APPEAL TO THE OFFICE OF THE INDEPENDENT ADJUDICATOR Pursuant to the Higher Education Act 2004, the Office of the Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education (the OIA) has been designated by the National Assembly for Wales from 1 January 2005 as the operator of an independent scheme in Wales for the review of student complaints. Once all the relevant University of Wales procedures above have been exhausted, a candidate may apply to the OIA for a review of the complaint. Any such application must be submitted by sending a completed Scheme Application Form together with all relevant information to the OIA within three months of the date on the “Completion of Procedures Letter” from the University of Wales upon completion of its internal procedures. A Scheme Application Form can be obtained from the University of Wales Registry, downloaded from the OIA website www.oiahe.org.uk or by telephoning or writing to the OIA. The contact details for the OIA are as follows: OIAHE, 5th Floor, Thames Tower, Station Road, Reading, RG1 1LX Tel: 0118 959 9813 Email: enquiries@oiahe.org.uk 6. MONITORING AND EVALUATION

The nature, incidence and outcomes of complaints will be regularly monitored and an annual report made to the Validation Board in this respect.

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