Free Essay

Handbook

In: Other Topics

Submitted By mu138
Words 35401
Pages 142
School of Health and Education

Secondary PGCE

Programme Handbook 2015-16

Student Name:
Programme Leader: Eddie Ellis

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Information in alternative formats
This handbook can be found online at: https://myunihub.mdx.ac.uk/web/homecommunity/mystudy If you have a disability which makes navigating the website difficult and you would like to receive information in an alternative format, please contact http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/support/disability/i ndex.aspx

Sections from this publication can be supplied as:


a Word document with enlarged type
— sent by email or supplied on a CD or memory stick



printed copy with enlarged type



printed copy on non-white paper



as Braille

Other formats may be possible. We will do our best to respond promptly. To help us, please be as specific as you can about the information you require and include details of your disability. PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Purpose and status of your student programme handbook
The purpose of this handbook is to provide you with information about your programme of study and to direct you to other general information about studying at Middlesex University, the majority of which is available on UniHub.
The material in this handbook is as accurate as possible at the date of

production however you will be informed of any major changes in a timely manner.
Your comments on any improvements to this handbook are welcome. Please put them in writing (an email will suffice) with the name of the handbook to Eddie Ellis
e.ellis@mdx.ac.uk

The University Regulations and Student Charter
As a student of Middlesex University you agree to abide by the University
Regulations when you enrol and therefore you should read this handbook in conjunction with the Regulations which are available online at; www.mdx.ac.uk/regulations. Some of the key regulations have been repeated on the Your Study pages on
UniHub http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/study.

You should also read the Student Charter which was co-developed by Middlesex students, staff and the Students’ Union.
This sets out your responsibilities as a student and those of the University to ensure that all students have an enjoyable, rewarding and effective experience during their time at Middlesex.
You can find the Student Charter on
UniHub.

The Student Guide
Before reading this Programme Handbook you should read the Student Guide; this guide contains information on more general university services and facilities, such as UniHub,
UniHelp and the Library. It is important that you familiarise yourself with this information in order to get the most from this handbook.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

CONTENTS
University and Programme Academic Calendar ............................................... 6 WELCOME TO THE SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND EDUCATION ..................... 8 Welcome from the Dean ................................................................................... 8 Programme Leader’s Welcome ........................................................................ 9 1. CONTACTS AND COMMUNICATION ....................................................... 10 1.1 Programme staff and contact details ........................................................ 10 Secondary Teaching Staff .................................................................. 10 Learner Development Unit (LDU) ...................................................... 11 Liaison Librarian ................................................................................. 11 Student Achievement Officer ............................................................. 12 1.2 Student website – UniHub ........................................................................ 12 Login details for myUniHub ................................................................ 12 1.3 Email ......................................................................................................... 13 1.4 Text messages .......................................................................................... 13 1.5 Your contact and personal details ............................................................. 13 1.7 Data Protection and Privacy ..................................................................... 16 2. YOUR PROGRAMME ................................................................................. 17 2.1 Programme structure diagram .................................................................. 17 2.2 The modules you will study ....................................................................... 17 2.3 Accessing your timetable .......................................................................... 18 2.4 How you will be taught .............................................................................. 18 2.5 How and when you will be assessed ........................................................ 19 2.6 Attendance requirements .......................................................................... 19 2.7 Professional and statutory requirements .................................................. 20 2.8 Children’s Rights and trainees’ Responsibilities ....................................... 21 2.9 Health and Safety requirements ............................................................... 22 2.10 Feeding back on your programme .......................................................... 22 Boards of Study and Student Voice Leaders ..................................... 22 Boards of Study meeting dates .......................................................... 22 Student Feedback Surveys ................................................................ 22 2.11 Employment ............................................................................................ 23 Applying for your first teaching post ................................................... 23 Careers Advisory Service .................................................................. 23 2.12 Library ..................................................................................................... 24 2.13 Learner Development Unit ...................................................................... 24 2.14 Placements ............................................................................................. 25 2.15 Assuring the quality of your programme ................................................. 26 External Examiners ............................................................................ 26 3. TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT ........................................... 27 3.1 Teaching and Learning ............................................................................. 27

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 4

3.3 Assessment .............................................................................................. 28 Principles............................................................................................ 28 E-Assessment .................................................................................... 29 Assessment regulations ..................................................................... 29 General guidelines for responses to the assignment tasks ............... 30 Assignments....................................................................................... 30 Assessment of School Experience .................................................... 32 Assessment Calendar ........................................................................ 34 3.4 Submission, receipt, marking and return of assessment ......................... 34 PGCE Specific Regulations ............................................................... 34 Submission and receipt of coursework .............................................. 34 Marking and moderation .................................................................... 35 Return of coursework ......................................................................... 35 3.5 Assessment Feedback .............................................................................. 35 3.6 Progressing on your programme .............................................................. 36 Academic Levels ................................................................................ 36 The Four Point Scale ......................................................................... 37 Level 7ness within the subject modules ............................................. 37 Level descriptors ................................................................................ 37 Re-assessment of subject studies modules ....................................... 38 Deferral of assessment ...................................................................... 38 Extenuating Circumstances ............................................................... 39 Results ............................................................................................... 39 3.7 Academic misconduct ............................................................................... 44 3.8 Appeals ..................................................................................................... 45 4.SUPPORT .................................................................................................... 46 4.1 Academic Support ..................................................................................... 46 Academic staff.................................................................................... 46 Support for academic writing ............................................................. 46 Student Achievement Officer Support ................................................ 47 Assessment Officer Support .............................................................. 47 4.2 Support services around the University .................................................... 47 Information on UniHub ....................................................................... 47 Disability and Dyslexia support .......................................................... 47 UniHelp Desk ..................................................................................... 48 Middlesex University Students’ Union (MDXSU) ............................... 48 5. Programme Specification and Curriculum Map for Secondary PGCE ........ 50 6. Module Narratives ....................................................................................... 58 7. Annexes ...................................................................................................... 96 Annexe 1: Fitness to Practice Policy and Procedure ......................... 96 Annexe 2: Withdrawal from Study Form ............................................ 99 Annexe 3: PGCE Secondary ITT Withdrawal / Interruption Supplement

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 5

100

University and Programme Academic Calendar
This is your calendar for the 2015/16 academic year
September
21
25

New student induction and teaching commences
Teacher Union event

October
02
07
07
12
19

Mentor Training
SE1 Induction Day
First school placement starts (SE1)
Submit assignment 1
Submit assignment 2 proposal

November
16

Board of Studies 1

December/January
14
Peer Assessment of SBR assignment
18
University closed for Christmas vacation
January 2015
04
04
20
25
27
25

University open after Christmas vacation
Submit SBR assignment
ATS 1 form from mentors to tutors
Return week at university
Subject Knowledge Review 2
Careers Day

February
02
15 tbc Second School placement starts (SE2)
Submit assignment 3 (M&A) proposal
Assessment Board

March
23
25

ATS 2 from Mentors to Tutors
Easter Vacation starts (subject to change according to school placement)

April
11

Teaching resumes

May
02
16
16
16
25
30

Bank holiday University closed
Subject Knowledge Review 3
Submit M&A assignment
Board of Studies 2
ATS 3 from Mentors to Tutors
Bank holiday University closed

June
06
tbc
23

SE3 (optional) 06 Jun- 24 Jun
Assessment Board
ATS Final from Mentors to Tutors

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 6

tbc

Publication of module results for taught modules

July tbc 13

Publication of progression decisions
Graduation Ceremonies for 2015-16 graduates

September tbc tbc

Publication of module results for taught modules
Publication of progression decisions

Student attendance dates
21 September 2014 – 18 December 2014
04 January 2015 – 24 March 2015
11 April 2015 – 27 June 2015
You can view your academic calendar on the ‘My Middlesex’ pages of UniHub: http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 7

WELCOME TO THE SCHOOL OF
HEALTH AND EDUCATION
Welcome from the Dean
Welcome to Middlesex University and to the School of Health and Education. This programme handbook contains an overview of your programme and its modules – keep it safe so that you may refer to it throughout your time on the programme.
The School offers a wide range of study opportunities at undergraduate and postgraduate level including diplomas, degrees, short courses and CPD opportunities. Many of the programmes are designed and accredited in conjunction with the relevant professional bodies.
The School of Health and Education is a leading centre for professional education in
London. Along with our diverse range of programmes and research activities, we offer various approaches to study and delivery to suit you and your commitments.
We emphasise a flexible, lifelong learning approach to study - backed up by expertise gained through our pioneering developments in work based learning and knowledge transfer.
Middlesex has built a strong reputation as a leading innovator in higher education.
Many of our programmes are UK firsts and have set the standard for others to follow.
Teaching, learning and research in the School has a strong emphasis on interdisciplinary activity. Our aim is to link policy and practice, theory and action through high quality learning and research. Our excellent skills laboratories and access to high quality practice areas will support your learning. We intervene at the interface between academia and practice. In Healthcare, social work and education, we apply our considerate resources to train the practitioners of the future. Essential to this is our very close partnership working with Schools, NHS Trusts, Local
Authorities and other public and private sector organisations as well as our local communities and a wide range of UK, EU and international collaborative partnerships. We aim to respond to student feedback to improve your experience at the university so that we will deliver the best student experience we can. In return we expect you to engage actively in the learning process, to be fully committed to your studies and determined to succeed.
In your early weeks, this includes reading through this handbook and consulting the other information sources flagged here; you are not expected to absorb everything in detail but to be aware of main documents and their contents. In particular as an enrolled Middlesex student you have certain rights but also specific responsibilities.
For details see the full University Regulations, in particular ‘University Membership’
(www.mdx.ac.uk/regulations), and if you have not already done so, explore UniHub

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 8

(http://www.unihub.mdx.ac.uk) the student website which contains detailed advice and support to assist you further.
We know it takes time to settle in to University life. If you still have questions to ask, your first port of call should be the UniHelp (http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/unihelp) which offers face-to-face, email and telephone information and advice, seven days a week.
The Unihelp desk is located on the Ground Floor of the Sheppard Library and the advisors there will be pleased to help and direct you.
Here at Middlesex we are very proud of our staff and students and we look forward to helping you build on your skills and knowledge to fulful your full potential. We wish you well in your future studies.
Jan Williams
Dean of School and Pro Vice-Chancellor

School of Health and Education
Hendon Campus
The Burroughs
Hendon
London
NW4 4BT
Telephone: +44(0)20 8411 5426
Web: http://www.mdx.ac.uk/aboutus/Schools/H&E/index.aspx
Programme Leader’s Welcome
On behalf of the PGCE Secondary team, I should like to welcome you to what we hope will be one of the most challenging but rewarding years of your life. The Secondary PGCE at
Middlesex has gained well-deserved recognition for establishing a high quality course for training teachers. You have been selected as someone who possesses the attributes and potential necessary to maintain and improve our high standards. The Secondary PGCE team prides itself on offering a quality programme that supports trainee Teachers in achieving the highest levels of attainment and professional standards.
During the course, you will be studying in both theoretical and practical situations. Reflecting on your progress and having clear precise targets for yourself is essential in ensuring your success. You will need plenty of energy and enthusiasm to motivate the pupils you teach
PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 9

and learn from the experienced practitioners around you. As a postgraduate, you will be expected to be proactive in finding ways to progress during the year, with help from your colleagues, mentors and programme leaders.
The purpose of this Programme Handbook is to explain your overall programme of study in detail. Please read it thoroughly so that you are familiar with the structure of the programme, the respective modules and assessment points. This Handbook should be read in conjunction with the School Experience Handbook and other documents that are published on your virtual learning environment (Moodle).
Very best wishes for a successful year,
Eddie Ellis
Director of Secondary Programmes

1. CONTACTS AND COMMUNICATION
1.1 Programme staff and contact details
The following members of staff are those who have a major input into your programme and you will be able to find most of these, as well as other important contacts listed in your Key
Contacts on myUniHub; https://myunihub.mdx.ac.uk/web/home-community/mymiddlesex
Please contact tutors by email.
Director of Secondary ITE Programmes
Eddie Ellis
Room Number
Tel:
E-mail:

Fenella
020 8411 6536
E.Ellis@mdx.ac.uk

Secondary Teaching Staff
Gavin Baldwin
Room Number
Tel:
E-mail:

Fenella
020 8411 6584
G.Baldwin@mdx.ac.uk

Tremaine Baker
Room Number
Tel:
E-mail:

Fenella
020 8411 4772
t.baker@mdx.ac.uk

Ross Cotter
Room Number
Tel:
E-mail:

Fenella
020 8411 4489
R.Cotter@mdx.ac.uk

Josh Emdon

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 10

Room Number
Tel:
E-mail:

Fenella
TBC
TBC

Gareth Evers
Room Number
Tel:
E-mail:

Fenella
020 8411 4700
g.evers@mdx.ac.uk

Raza Kazim
Room Number
Tel:
E-mail:

Fenella
020 8411 6149
r.kazim@mdx.ac.uk

Karen Parks
Room Number
Tel:
E-mail:

Fenella
020 8411 5446
k.parks@mdx.ac.uk

Alex Suthern
Room Number
Tel:
E-mail:

Fenella
020 8411 4702
a.suthern@mdx.ac.uk

Catherine Walsh
Room Number
Tel:
E-mail:

Fenella
020 8411 3716
C.Walsh@mdx.ac.uk

Lech Wersocki
Room Number
Tel:
E-mail:

Fenella
020 8411 5708
L.Wersocki@mdx.ac.uk

Learner Development Unit (LDU)
Your Academic Writing & Language Coordinator will provide academic support to you in areas such as writing essays and reports, giving presentations and participating in academic discussions. She will work with you in seminars and you can also contact her for individual support. Alexandra Pitt
Room
Tel:
Email:
Means of communication:

SB12
020 8411 6128
a.pitt@mdx.ac.uk
emails/phone/in person

Liaison Librarian
Your liaison librarian works closely with Secondary PGCE staff to ensure the resources and support that you need is available and provides information and research skills workshops relevant to Secondary Education. You can contact them if you require individual support or if you would like to suggest a book, DVD etc for the library.
Jodie Ward

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 11

Room
Tel:
Email:
Means of communication:

Library
020 8411 5546
j.ward@mdx.ac.uk
emails/phone/in person

Student Achievement Officer
In addition to your Programme Leader and Module Leader, get in touch with your Student
Achievement Officer as they are one of your first points of contact for queries regarding your studies. Your Student Achievement Officer offers support in dealing with any issue that may affect your academic performance and will either help you to deal with those issues directly or will refer you to who you need to see in the university. You can also get valuable guidance on time management, planning your studies, preparing for assessment and tips on revision and exam technique. Student Achievement Officers are available to advise students on a daily basis at UniHelp; you can drop in when it suits you. Alternatively, you can book an appointment to speak to Andrew Roessler or Joanna Sifonios via UniHub: unihub.mdx.ac.uk/support/appointment Secondary Placement Manager
Diana Taylor
Room Number
Tel:
Email:
Assessment officers
Jackie Dennison/Yasmin Ziya
Tel/FAX:
Email:
Office hours
Means of communication:

S2
020 8411 4539
d.taylor@mdx.ac.uk or
ITTQTS@mdx.ac.uk

020 8411 4832/5769
j.dennison@mdx.ac.uk
y.ziya@mdx.ac.uk
9.30-16.00 Mon-Fri emails/phone/in person

1.2 Student website – UniHub
One of your primary sources of information is the student website UniHub http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk which can be accessed on and off campus .The site has the latest news and events from around the University, plus a lot of useful information about your support services as well as all the important regulations and policies you should be aware of.
This website is your first port of call for all general Middlesex information although some of the important items are included in this handbook.
The site also has a password protected section myUniHub (accessed from the UniHub home page). Here you can view personalised information on your studies such as your timetable, grades, programme information and coursework as well as undertake most administrative tasks such as enrolling and updating your contact details.
Login details for myUniHub

Your login details to access the personalised areas of UniHub are:


Username: Your IT User ID – this is the 5 digit code found on the reverse of your student card in the format aannn (where ‘aa’ are your initials and ‘nnn’ is a system generated number).

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 12



Initial password: Your 9 digit student number (including the ‘M’) and the first three characters of your birth month e.g. M12345678nov. When you first log in you will be prompted to change your password to something more memorable (you should have already done this).

You can find both your IT User ID and your student number on your student card.
If you have any problems accessing myUniHub please contact
UniHelp http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/webhelpdesk

1.3 Email
As an enrolled student you have your own university email address. Lecturers, the student support team, the library and other areas of administration will use this e-mail address to contact you so it is critical that you check your account regularly (at least twice a week) or forward mail to an account that you do check regularly.
Your email address is your IT User ID and is in the form aannn@live.mdx.ac.uk where (‘aa’ are your initials and ‘nnn’ is a system generated number). Your IT user ID is found on the reverse of your student ID card.
You can access your email by logging into UniHub and going to the My Middlesex page; https://myunihub.mdx.ac.uk Quick guides on using your account are available on UniHub; http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/support In case of any problems with your email please contact the UniHelp: http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/webhelpdesk 1.4 Text messages
We may also send you text messages with important and urgent information so please ensure that you provide us with an up-to-date mobile phone number when you first enrol and inform us when it changes (see below for how).

1.5 Your contact and personal details
It is very important that you keep us informed of any changes to your personal contact details and of your emergency contact at all times. You can view and change what we currently have recorded for you on the Admin and Finances page of myUniHub; https://myunihub.mdx.ac.uk/web/homecommunity/myadminandfinances Please note that you cannot change your name online. This has to be done in person at the
UniHelp Desk with official supporting documentation (marriage certificate, passport etc).

1.6 Giving your feedback – suggestions and complaints
(See also section 2.10 Student representation on your course)
From time to time you will be asked for your feedback on your programme, modules and the
University. This feedback is important to us and we aim to let you know what has happened as a result. One way we do this is through the university publication You Said We Did which can be read on the Student Feedback pages on UniHub: http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/mdx/feedback. PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 13

We welcome your suggestions on how we might improve even when this takes the form of a complaint. If you have a suggestion or a complaint about any aspect of university life then please raise it with the person concerned in the first instance. If you are not satisfied with the outcome you can progress the matter through the management structure of the
University. Full details of how to do this are available on the student feedback pages of
UniHub: http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/mdx/feedback
Student concerns
If students want to raise issues or concerns regarding their PGCE Programme including their
School Experience they should refer to the University Regulations for STUDENT
COMPLAINTS AND GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES http://www.mdx.ac.uk/aboutus/Strategy/regulations/index.aspx In the first instance, in all but exceptional circumstances, concerns regarding the Programme or School Experience should be discussed with the relevant Course Tutor or Pathway Tutor.
This process constitutes the informal stage 1 referred to in the regulations. A record of the meeting/s will be recorded as follows and the matter should be resolved.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 14

STUDENT COMPLAINT RECORD
Informal Stage 1
Record of meeting/s with Student
Student Name

Date

Tutor Name

Place and Time

Please comment on the student’s awareness of the university procedures and support services* and any actions taken before the meeting
*In the first instance students who wish to make a complaint shall discuss it with one of the following who will advise how the complaint is best progressed
A representative of MUSU,
A student adviser (through the appropriate School Student Office)
Equal Opportunities Adviser or counsellor

Nature of complaint
Please itemise and refer to any evidence and its location

Action/s proposed to resolve the problem

Outcome of the meeting/s
CC, DoP, Course Administrator
*Please attach/forward the minutes of any additional meetings held with the student and any other relevant evidence
Only if the matter is not resolved satisfactorily should the student should then refer the matter to the Director of Progammes to instigate a second informal stage.
STUDENT COMPLAINT
Informal Stage 2
Record of meeting/s with Student
Has Informal stage 1 been completed?
Are there IS1 records?
Why were the IS1 outcomes unsatisfactory?
Proposed action to resolve the problem/s
Outcome

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 15

It is important that students follow this procedure, failure to do so will result in delay, as staff will always refer students back to the appropriate person who is responsible for the respective areas. As a matter of courtesy, all concerns relating to the overall running of the programme should be discussed with the Programme Leader.

1.7 Data Protection and Privacy
The information that you provide at enrolment is held on a computerised database and maintained in accordance with the Data Protection Act. We ensure that the data is held securely and not disclosed to third parties without your consent, unless we are obliged to do so by law (for example the annual student record that we submit to the Higher Education
Statistics Agency).
To ensure security, continuity and privacy, the University discourages the use of private accounts for University business. You should ensure that the personal information about you is accurate and up to date but you are not required to publicise this private information to other students or individual members of staff.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 16

2. YOUR PROGRAMME
2.1 Programme structure diagram
Year 1

40 CR Level 7

Autumn

Subject Pedagogy
EDS 4200

Year 1

School Experience 1
EDS 3111

20 CR Level 7

Spring&
Summer

20CR level 6

Subject Education
EDS 4201 Business Studies
EDS 4202 Citizenship
EDS 4265 Drama with English
EDS 4204 English
EDS 4206 Computer Science
EDS 4207 Mathematics
EDS 4209 Music
EDS 4210 Science with Biology
EDS 4211 Science with Chemistry
EDS 4212 Science with Physics

40CR level 6
School Experience 2
EDS 3112

2.2 The modules you will study
The programme consists of 4 modules. The specific structure for assessment is as follows:
Module
SE1

Credit
20

Semester
Autumn

SE2

40

Spring & Summer

Subject Pedagogy

40

Autumn

Assessment
Against Professional
Standards
Against Professional
Standards
Coursework

Subject Education

20

Spring & Summer

Coursework

You can find a list of the modules you are currently registered for within the My Learning area on the My Study page of myUniHub; https://myunihub.mdx.ac.uk/web/homecommunity/mystudy.
When you click on any of the modules you will be able to access associated learning materials (e.g. lecture notes), information on the learning aims and outcomes and assessment methods as well the schedule for assessment which will include deadlines for the submission of your assessment.
Announcements for any of your modules will also appear in My Learning on myUniHub so you should log in and check each module regularly.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 17

2.3 Accessing your timetable
The timetable is finalised over the summer but once this is done you can access your personal timetable from myUniHub; https://myunihub.mdx.ac.uk/web/homecommunity/mystudy (you can also search the whole university timetable here too). You are allocated to timetabled lectures, labs, seminars, workshops etc based on your module registrations. If your timetable is incomplete or you are unable to view it then please contact your programme leader.

2.4 How you will be taught
Teaching on the programme is highly student centred and in order to create the most beneficial learning environment tutors employ a wide range of learning and teaching strategies. All modules are carefully planned to ensure that university sessions are taught in a range of ways, demonstrating good pedagogic practice for student teachers. The methods used will include lectures, presentations, a wide range of group work for specific purposes, plenary discussions, practical sessions, micro teaching and individual tutorials, directed tasks, negotiated tasks and some distance learning.
Learning/teaching sessions are structured to promote collaborative learning and student autonomy. There will be a strong emphasis on the value of self-review and reflection so that trainees begin/continue to understand their own patterns of learning and make connections with the school context.
From the start, trainees will be required to follow up sessions with further independent study to ensure that they are developing confidence in their own professional knowledge. They will also be encouraged to draw on Information and communication technology (ICT) to support their own study. Active use of current research evidence and inspection findings will be a feature of taught sessions.
Examples of learning and teaching strategies include:










tutor presentations to whole group; workshops as a whole group, smaller groups or pairs as appropriate with tutor leadership; project work in learner groups; student-led discussions, seminars and presentations; individual tutorials; workplace focused observations and classroom-based enquiry; use of audio-visual material and information technology; distance learning using structured and negotiated study; independent learning.

All modules seek to link academic content to each trainee’s professional experience and require trainees to reflect on course content in relation to their work situation and the pupils they work with.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 18

2.5 How and when you will be assessed
School-based training
Date

Instruction

20 Jan 2016

Element of
Assessment
ATS 1st review

23 March 2016

ATS 2nd review

Electronic copy to reach Tutor by this date.

25 May 2016

ATS 3rd review

Electronic copy to reach Tutor by this date.

23 June 2016

ATS Final assessment Electronic copy to reach Tutor by this date.

Electronic copy to reach Tutor by this date.

Centre-based training
Date

Element of
Instruction
Assessment
12 Oct 2015
Why Teach your
To reach your tutor by this date. trainee retains specialism essay copy. 19 Oct 2015
SBR Assignment
To reach Tutor by this date. trainee retains copy.
Proposal form
14 Dec 2015
SBR Assignment
Ensure another student has seen your assignment
Peer Evaluation and given detailed feedback against the criteria.
04 Jan 2016
SBR Assignment
To reach Tutor by this date. trainee retains copy.
15 Feb 2016
M&A Assignment To reach Tutor by this date. trainee retains copy.
Proposal Form
16 May 2016
M&A Assignment To reach Tutor by this date. trainee retains copy.
Note**: Submission time of assignments is by 9.30am
IMPORTANT: Please note that assessment deadlines do occasionally change and while every effort has been made to ensure this is correct at the time of publishing you should check with your programme leader and on UniHub so you are aware of any changes.

2.6 Attendance requirements
Full attendance is required across the secondary PGCE provision. If you are absent for any reason for longer than one week, without notifying your programme leader, we will assume that you have left the course and your bursary will be cancelled. You need to attend all sessions to ensure that you meet the professional standards associated with becoming a teacher and the learning outcomes of the modules.
You should attend all scheduled classes and prescribed activities to be eligible for formal assessment. Where your attendance fails to meet the minimum required to meet the learning outcomes of the module (as published) you may be excluded from the assessment and be graded X in the module. The definition of the X grade is “Fail – incomplete without good reason: may not be reassessed”. It is your responsibility to ensure that your attendance fulfils the published attendance requirements.
The X grade is applied if you fail to participate in the learning processes of a module for which you are registered. It is not a “punishment” for poor attendance but a recognition that you have not been able to prepare yourself for assessment in the content of the module. It

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 19

is also given when you drop a module without formally removing it from your registered programme of study.
If you receive an X grade you may have the opportunity of taking the whole module again with permission from the Programme Leader, without grade penalty, though you will have to pay the module registration fee.
Attendance at university sessions is essential and there is a 100% attendance requirement for each module. In the event of a second unauthorized absence, a letter will be sent to you from your Programme Leader warning of the possible danger of failing a module through lack of attendance.
After illness, please notify your tutors in each group for which you have been absent upon your return to the university. In the case of being unwell for longer than one week a certificate should be produced at the Campus Student office to be placed on file.
For School Experience, you must contact your Programme Leader and the school as soon as possible to leave a message and also contact the Placement Administrator at the university. If you are absent from school experience your Tutor and Mentor will decide whether you need to make up the time at the end of the placement.
For further guidance on attendance requirements, refer to the section on attendance which is available on the Your Study pages of UniHub; http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk. The University regulations about attendance are available on line at: http://www.mdx.ac.uk/aboutus/Strategy/regulations/sectioncpg.aspx Policy on late arrival
Punctuality in teaching is a professional requirement. The Programme has a policy to which students are required to adhere. Sufficient time needs to be allowed in relation to travelling arrangements so that students arrive in good time.
You are expected to arrive in time to allow for a prompt start to all sessions. This reflects your professionalism and is often commented on in references. If you know that you will be late you should contact your Programme Leader or your Group Leader for Professional
Studies. As with attendance, our records will indicate punctuality.
Students who arrive once a session is in progress may not be allowed to attend. As late arrivals can cause disruption to mass lectures students may not be admitted after the agreed start time of the lecture. Under these circumstances they must report to their Group Leader at the end of the lecture. They will need to demonstrate that they have made up the work that was missed.
For School Experience, students come under the responsibility of the school to which they have been placed and will need to adhere strictly to their attendance requirements.
For further guidance on attendance requirements, refer to the section on attendance which is available on UniHub; http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/study/attend.
The full regulations regarding attendance are in Section C of the University Regulations: http://www.mdx.ac.uk/regulations 2.7 Professional and statutory requirements
In order to be recommended for QTS, you must gain the PGCE award. On successful completion of the PGCE course you will be recommended to the NCTL for QTS.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 20

The PGCE course is designed to enable you to meet the standards for QTS (Qualified
Teacher Status) as stipulated by the NCTL and the Department for Education. The standards addressed at each stage of your course will be clearly communicated to you either through your handbook or during each session. You will also keep an on-going audit of evidence to show that you have met these standards by the end of the course.
As you are embarking on a course that prepares you to take on the professional responsibilities of being a teacher as indicated in the Teachers’ Standards, you are therefore expected to demonstrate consistently high standards of personal and professional conduct both in school and in University settings. The Teachers’ Standards Part Two May 2012 defines the behaviour and attitudes that set the required standard for conduct during training and throughout a teacher’s career.
The PGCE programme will constitute a 'Fitness to Practise' panel (Teaching Students) to work in conjunction with University conduct regulations and to consider any conduct which is deemed to render a student a person not fit to be admitted to and practise the teaching profession (See Annexe 1).
An important aspect of this professionalism is to respect confidentiality. You must, therefore, remember that all paperwork that you produce is public. In assessed work you must not reveal the identity of schools, teachers and pupils for example.
Ethical issues in relation to assignments, particularly with regard to school-based research, are discussed for example in
Wilson, E (2009) School-based Research: A guide for education students London: SAGE

2.8 Children’s Rights and trainees’ Responsibilities
The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child is a human rights treaty (which the UK has signed up to) that enshrines specific children’s rights in international law. These rights define universal principles and standards for the status and treatment of children worldwide, where a ‘child’ is defined as every human being below the age of eighteen. UNICEF’s Rights &
Responsibilities for Children Article 16 states: ‘Children have the right to privacy. The law will protect them from attacks against their way of life, their good name, their families and their homes.’ The teacher’s Code of Conduct and Practice lays out ‘Standards of propriety expected of the profession’ including ‘observing confidentiality and respect’ regarding pupils and misconduct such as ‘swearing or being offensive’ or ‘failing to safeguard pupils,’ which could result in disciplinary hearings for incompetence.
Being a teacher is a privilege. Large groups of children are placed under your care, and you are given a huge responsibility for their wellbeing. Teaching requires a high ethical standard, fully professional conduct and constant care of duty. Your University, schools, parents and class are depending on you to be responsible at all times in every way you can. You are a model for others.
This means that a teacher acting with thoughtlessness or disrespect about a child, children or their families could be breaking professional standards or breaking the law. Casual use of names, words or images on Facebook, etc, emails or text messages could be seen by others, cause offense, or be copied and misused, which is the writer’s responsibility. This or using resources carelessly from unchecked or inappropriate Internet sites, etc., could be a
‘violation of ethical standards, unprofessional conduct or the neglect of duty’, and could cost you your qualified teacher status (QTS).

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 21

It is our requirement at Middlesex University that all our trainee students are always positive, professional and vigilant about children and for children in support of their human rights. All schools have an Acceptable Use policy for using technology from the internet to video or mobile phone cameras, which students must read and follow. If in any doubt about any of these matters, check with a tutor, mentor or practising teacher.

2.9 Health and Safety requirements
The University has responsibilities under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 to ensure that risks to health and safety are controlled and you are properly insured while on placement. It is therefore essential that no student commence a placement without first having it approved by the School Placement staff and as such ensuring that all administrative, health and safety and insurance procedures are carried out prior to the start date. Failure to adhere to this may invalidate your placement.
Health and Education – Tony Leon G32 X5097

2.10 Feeding back on your programme
Boards of Study and Student Voice Leaders

Each programme (or group of programmes) has a Board of Studies the purpose of which is to provide a forum for discussion between your student representatives and the staff involved in all aspects of the PGCE Secondary programme. The membership for all Boards of Study includes:
• Student representatives (see below for more information about being a Student Voice
Leader)
• Director of Programme/ Head of Department (Chair)
• Academic staff involved in the delivery of the programme modules
• Support services representatives
Your student voice leader is responsible for notifying the Board of issues that have been brought to them by you. Minutes are made of the discussions and decisions of each meeting and these are circulated to members. The minutes are also considered by the
School during an annual review period. You can read the minutes of your Board of Study meeting online in the programme area of MyUniHub
Boards of Study meeting dates
16 November 2015
23 May 2016
Student Voice Leaders are student representatives, elected at the start of the academic year. They ensure that the interests of students on the programme are represented, attending Boards of Study as well as Student Voice conferences. They are also responsible for feeding back the outcomes of any meetings or events they attend. You can find out more about how to become one and who your student voice leader is on the Middlesex University
Students’ Union (MdxSU) website: http://www.mdxsu.com/studentvoice
Student Feedback Surveys

Anonymous feedback surveys take place during and towards the end of the academic year.
The aim of the surveys is to give you the opportunity to give your views on the quality of your programme and your satisfaction overall. You are asked to say how much you agree
(strongly agree to strongly disagree) with different statements in each of the following areas:

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 22






Teaching on your course
Quality of school placements and support
Assessment and feedback
Confidence: How well prepared you feel for all the elements of teaching your subject

It is important that you complete these surveys as they help us to identify what you think is going well and what we need to address to continue to improve the student experience for you and future students at Middlesex.
Results of the surveys are used by tutors to produce an action plan that says how they intend to resolve any problems and share any good practice. This action plan is discussed during Board of Study meetings with student representatives.

2.11 Employment
Secondary PGCE works closely with the University careers service to provide detailed guidance within your programme that is designed to support you in applying for and in gaining your first teaching post.
Applying for your first teaching post

It is not unusual for trainees to be interviewed and offered their first teaching post during final school experience. You should give your course tutor as your first referee on applications for a first teaching post. There is no need to ask for permission to do this. The reference will be made up of a letter drawing on your academic profile and School Experience ATS reports from SE1 and SE2. The university will not normally provide references for subsequent teaching posts. Requests for references should be addressed to your Course Tutor at:
Fenella Building
Middlesex University
The Burroughs, Hendon, NW4 4BT
Careers Advisory Service

Today’s job market is full of opportunities but is also rapidly changing and developing to meet the needs of employers in the 21st Century. Gaining work experience and developing the employability skills that employers look for is an important part of your career planning and development and will help towards your future career success.
The Careers Advisory Service provides impartial and confidential guidance and information while you are a current student but also for up to two years after your graduation to help you in your career planning and job seeking. The service provides a range of facilities which include: •

careers information,



individual guidance appointments,



drop-in advice sessions,



careers seminars and workshops,



employer presentations,



careers fairs,



other campus based careers events,



alumni links to support you with your career development.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 23

The Careers Advisory Service pages on UniHub (http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk Work and
Careers page) contain an on-line job vacancy service, JobsPlus, where opportunities notified by employers for full time, part time, voluntary work or work experience are posted. If you are unable to visit on campus you can use ‘MeG’ an e-guidance service through which you can email your queries to a careers advisor.
The main careers library is based at Hendon and careers advisors are available on most campuses offering a flexible service to support the needs and any specific requirements of all students. To check opening times and availability of careers advisors on your campus or to book an appointment please refer to the information on UniHub; http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk

2.12 Library
You will meet your Liaison Librarian (see Key Contacts at the start of this handbook) during your induction week firstly for an introduction to the library service and resources and then in a follow up session that will show you how PGCE students should be utilising the library and resources including key journals and other learning resources.
A series of Library Subject Guides (http://libguides.mdx.ac.uk) have been designed to assist students. Each one supports an individual subject area, including PGCE Secondary and includes links to useful resources such as key websites and blogs as well as general help with studying and researching topics for assessment.
You can get also specialist support from your Liaison Librarian (see Key Contacts at the start of this handbook) who provides information and research skills workshops relevant to PGCE
Secondary. The subject librarian works closely with your lecturers to ensure the resources and support that you need is available. You can contact your librarian if you require individual support or if you would like to suggest a book/DVD etc for the library.
Please refer to UniHub for full information about the library and learning resources available to you: http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/study/library

2.13 Learner Development Unit
The Learner Development Unit (LDU) is a team of specialists who work with students at the university on different aspects of academic study and developing these essential skills.
They offer face-to-face help through: o Academic Writing & Language o Maths, Statistics & Numeracy o Dyslexia & various SpLDs
For further details see the University Guide to or the Learner Development Unit pages on
UniHub. unihub.mdx.ac.uk/study/ldu
Academic Writing and Language Academic Writing and Language (AWL) is a team of lecturers whose role is to support and guide students to excel in their academic communication. They help you develop effective academic communication in 4 main ways:
Embedded sessions: are run in collaboration with your lecturers and they are programmed into your modules.
Workshops: These are FREE classes. To find out what’s on and to book a place, go to http://workshops-ldu.mdx.ac.uk/; or visit UniHelp in the Sheppard Library
Online resources: Online tutorials, activities and factsheets are available at http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/study/ldu/onlineresources/index.aspx PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 24

Tutorials: tutorials are 30-minute one-to-one meetings with one of the LDU lecturers. AWL tutorials are confidential and FREE! To find out more, go to http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/study/ldu/facetoface/awl/index.aspx ; and to book a tutorial, go to http://tiny.cc/ldubooking or visit UniHelp in the Sheppard Library
A note on proofreading: LDU do NOT offer a proofreading service. This means they will not find and correct every ‘error’ in a piece of work. Instead, they will read your work, identify aspects for you to work on, and help you understand how to make your own improvements.
Dyslexia / Specific Learning Difficulty Support [SpLD]
Dyslexia/SpLD Support provide an extensive range of services for students, including: o 1:1 specialist tutorial support for students with Dyslexia and other Specific Learning
Difficulties (SpLD) such as Dyspraxia, AD(H)D.

o

Initial Dyslexia/SpLD Screenings

o

Diagnostic Assessments

o

Guidance and support through the Disabled Students Allowance (DSA) application process. o

Workshops and embedded support for students on topics such as: Dyslexia and other SpLDs, DSA procedures, Exam preparation, Employability/job application advice, etc.

o

Work-placement support

o

On-line Dyslexia/SpLD Resources

For further information regarding Dyslexia/SpLD Support please see: http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/study/ldu/facetoface/dyslexia/index or visit UniHelp in the Sheppard
Library. You can also email dystutor@mdx.ac.uk or phone 020 8411 6073.
Mathematics, Statistics and Numeracy Support
LDU offer friendly, confidential and free support for all Middlesex University students in the form of on-to-one tutorials, group workshops or embedded sessions. o You can book a one-to-one tutorial here: http://tiny.cc/ldubooking or visit Unihelp in the Sheppard Library o Details of our workshops are here: http://workshops-ldu.mdx.ac.uk/ Alternatively you can visit our UniHub site to access our online resources: http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/study/ldu/onlineresources/maths-stats-numeracy/index.aspx o You can also drop in to the Learning Lounge (Basement of the Sheppard Library) where you can find some of our resources or have an informal chat with one of our
Student Learning Assistants. http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/study/ldu/facetoface/learning-lounge/index.aspx o Or you can contact the numeracy co-ordinator by e-mailing numeracy@mdx.ac.uk 2.14 Placements
Work placements are supported across the University by a network of School placement offices who work closely with your academic staff. Teaching placements are integral to the
PGCE Secondary course. You will undertake two placements; one between October and

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 25

January and the other from January to June. (See your School Experience Handbook for further details.) Your Programme leaders and the placement office work closely together to make the most suitable placement for you in a Partnership school. The placements are monitored and assessed using the ATS, Progress and Attainment Record. Your Placement
Office can be contacted as follows: Diana Taylor email: d.taylor@mdx.ac.uk

2.15 Assuring the quality of your programme
To ensure the high standards and quality of Middlesex University provision all programmes are subject to the University’s academic quality assurance procedures (which include those procedures related to programme approval, monitoring and review).
External Examiners

A key feature of these quality processes is the input from external subject experts (external examiners) who ensure that Middlesex awards are comparable to those of other UK higher education institutions, and that the programme curriculum, teaching, assessment and resources are appropriate.
You can read more about the role of External Examiners on UniHub: http://www.intra.mdx.ac.uk/ouruniversity/services/clte/externalexaminers/index.aspx PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 26

3. TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT
The learning, teaching and assessment approaches used throughout your programme will encourage you to be actively involved in your learning and to co-operate with other students.
We aim to give you prompt feedback on your learning as well as opportunities to reflect upon and learn from that feedback.

3.1 Teaching and Learning
You will be actively involved in a range of learning, teaching and assessment approaches as part of PGCE Secondary Course. Such active approaches aim to put you at the centre of your learning so you are involved and engaged in all aspects of your assessment and learning. Your programme will require your active participation in learning activities and engagement with your fellow students both individually and collaboratively, working and learning with other students as part of a small group. Learning activities may also occur both within and outside the classroom.
Your learning will also be supported by technology. Increasingly your tutors will be using existing and emerging learning technologies to engage you in e-learning activities. Your programme will be facilitated using a variety of media and online tools (My Learning on
UniHub, podcasts, wikis, etc) which will allow you flexible access to a diverse range of online resources, quizzes and learning materials as well as collaborative tools with which you can engage and learn with your peers. Not confined by the time and space associated with traditional teaching methods you may take part in online discussions and learning activities from wherever you are studying.
Your tutors and the UniHelp desk will provide any support you may need whilst learning online. By engaging with e- learning you will also be developing skills which are essential for your learning and are also highly valued by employers. These include but are not limited to: working flexibly, communication, understanding of IT, team working and creating shared understandings based on quality resources and access to global expertise.
E-Learning
By design the PGCE is a blended learning programme. Student Teachers spend part of their time learning at the University and part of their time applying this knowledge in a teaching context within schools. E learning is vital in bridging this experience and making the course a coherent learning programme.
From the point of interview students engage with tutors at the University. We provide
‘bridging materials’ that support and develop existing subject knowledge and expertise.
These are often developed through wikis. The University has a license to use http://www.wikispaces.com. The type of activity that students engage in prior to the course will include observations in school, writing reflections on these, reading specific books and journals, developing subject knowledge and engaging with peers.
During the welcome week students are introduced to the key areas that will support their learning; amongst them UniHub, Moodle, and email. UniHub is the University web entry point to all the information and resources students will need through the year. All the answers are here! Students need to login to http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk and there are a variety of video guides to help you understand the system.
There is also an open Wiki that has all the information needed for both Student teachers and mentors in schools. This is at middlesexsecondarypartnership.middlesex.wikispaces.net and is an essential reference
PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 27

base for assignments, assessment, and school experience.
Once logged in they can also see the Moodle area we use listed under MyLearning. We have structured Moodle around the two main modules taught at the University: Subject
Pedagogy and Education Studies. Within these areas students will engage with discussion groups, complete online quizzes, watch video material, download resources, upload material to share with others and complete assignments. Moodle also links with electronic reading lists. All of these developments help to support our aim of developing a reflective practitioner. Microsoft Outlook 365 provides student email. All Students are allocated a personal email address and storage space. They can use Outlook, Word, Powerpoint and Excel on their computer or on the web.
3.2 Professional Studies
Professional Studies is an important part of your Subject Pedagogy module and takes place in tutor groups on alternate Mondays throughout the year. Each day is mapped against the standards and provides you with a valuable insight into pedagogical approaches as well as providing clear evidence of your achievement against the Teachers’ Standards.
The day starts with a keynote lecture to introduce a new issue using relevant theory and up to date practice. A follow up session usually give you a chance to critically analyse the theories or ideas raised in the lecture in the light of your classroom experience. You also consider the impact the learning in the day may have on your teaching to come. The session may well have a practical outcome in your producing a resource, plan or research tool that you will apply to your practice in the coming weeks.
Expect to be busy in these sessions, carrying out research, presenting to your peers or developing resources for yourself and your colleagues. Your folder should be organised following the weekly themes, gathering information from all PS sessions at university and in school as well as wider reading and research.

The tutor who leads on Professional Studies is Gareth Evers 3.3 Assessment
Principles

Assessment on Secondary PGCE Programme has been developed to meet the University’s aspirations expressed through its Enhancing Learning Teaching and Assessment (ELTA)
Strategy to enhance the assessment experience for Middlesex students on innovative programmes leading to improvements in student achievement.
The Secondary PGCE programme will continue to adopt innovative approaches to assessment that integrate formative and summative assessment for monitoring and self evaluation in an improvement cycle designed to continuously raise the standards of trainees.
The following principles have been adopted across the secondary pathways: o Assessment at each stage of the course measures the progress made by trainees against the standards for QTS and PGCE.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 28

o

Assessment informs and reinforces learning by students and is embedded in student learning. Assessment tasks are linked directly to taught sessions

o

Assessment is clearly aligned with learning outcomes and is appropriate to the diversity of students

o

Assessment relates to a breadth of evidence developed through integrated study and school based practice.

o

The assessment process is collaborative and involves trainees, mentors and tutors.

o

Detailed assessment criteria are publishing and shared with students and by all those involved in assessment. Audits and reports are made available to all parties in order to provide information to support planning.

o

Trainees are required to take responsibility for their own learning and aspire to the highest standard in a continual process of self-assessment. This is an essential feature of their professional development and characteristic of professional practice.
Students engage in peer and self review of assignments.

o

Formative feedback to trainees by tutors and mentors supports a process of target setting and action planning for development

o

Students receive prompt, clear and constructive feedback and feed forward where appropriate on their performance.

o

The assessment leader and programme leaders take responsibility for ensuring that the assessment process is carried out consistently and fairly for all trainees through monitoring and moderation processes.

o

The assessment leader and programme leaders are responsible for ensuring that the university assessment regulations, standards and criteria are applied rigorously and consistently across all secondary PGCE pathways through the process of moderation.

o

There are staged deadlines to manage the assessment workload.

o

Guidance is provided on academic writing with targeted individual support

E-Assessment

Students will share documents with peers as much as tutors. Unihub, Moodle, and email systems encourage this collaboration. At formal assessment points all work is submitted electronically on Moodle as PDF documents through Turnitin. This system scans for plagiarism and provides an environment to assist online marking. All assignments are submitted electronically. If a short piece of work is received that has not been sent through
Moodle then we use the Reviewing feature in Microsoft Word to comment on the work.
Moodle is very flexible and we will explore the opportunities afforded by this through the year. Moodle does not depend upon Javascript or Flash and works equally well on PCs,
Macs and Tablets.
Assessment regulations

This section should be read and considered in conjunction to the assessment guidance within the University Regulations 2015-16.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 29

Relevant regulations include: o o o o o All assignments need to be completed and submitted on time.
Any dates for submission of work published in the Assessment Calendar before the
University’s published deadlines need to be adhered to.
‘Automatic deferral’ is not permitted within this programme.
Any failures can be redeemed once by/at the next assessment point.
Work within the programme is assessed using the four point scale, detailed below.

General guidelines for responses to the assignment tasks

In addition to the specific stated requirements in the task descriptions, tutors follow generic guidelines applying to the assessment of academic work where appropriate.
Assignments should: o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o

Be adequately organised and have a clear logical structure
Be communicated clearly and concisely in an appropriate genre and style
Meet the brief of the assessment task. (handled/discussed the issue/topic indicated in the specification of the work )
Demonstrate understanding of the issues and represent them accurately/fairly
Show evidence of critical and in depth reading drawing on relevant literature or research to explore a professional issue and/or support a line of enquiry in the relevant subject area. There will normally need to be evidence of extra or wider relevant reading to attain the higher grades
Analyse practical issues within a theoretical framework.
Use professional experience as well as research, reading and other source material where appropriate to identify a line of enquiry or to support an argument.
Use a theoretical framework to support professional planning and show awareness of its implications for professional development.
Show critical awareness in relating theoretical issues to the trainee’s own professional practice and/or work context, and integrate both theoretical and practical considerations in analysis and evaluation.
Demonstrate an awareness of ways in which interventions/initiatives may improve professional practice, and awareness of the skills and knowledge required to effect and/or evaluate this.
Provide evidence of ability to select and justify methods in planning small-scale enquiries and demonstrate skills in collection and analysis of relevant data.
Identify strategies for promoting effective professional practice and, where appropriate, implement and evaluate such strategies.
Place the issues addressed in a wider educational context and show how they relate to the trainee’s professional role and/or professional development.
Demonstrate an understanding of and critical reflection upon issues relating to class,
‘race’, gender and disability where appropriate.
Present ideas, analyses, arguments and/or evaluations clearly in a form which demonstrates sound planning and effective organisation.
Show awareness of more than one point of view and of possible objections to your own preferred position;
Reach independent conclusions which, after critical reflection, is both reasonable and well argued
Demonstrate awareness of the criteria which should underpin assessed coursework

Assignments

Centre based Assessment

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 30

The assessments required to complete the module have been scheduled with the working demands of this programme in mind. Submission dates are published in advance and comply with university regulations. The workplace focus of assignments will both feed into and draw from the trainee's professional experience and individual training needs.
Assignments are designed to assess experience, knowledge and practice in the theoretical and pedagogic aspects of the programme. A range of enquiry-based work is involved, focused upon subject studies and school experience, including the observation of teachers and learners in their placement schools.
The trainee’s work is expected to demonstrate wide reading and critical reflection linking theory to practice across their subject.
The method of assessment for each module has been chosen to relate closely to its stated content and pedagogy. The variety of methods employed allows tutors to assess particular competences and standards in the most appropriate way. Assignments focus on the professional context of the student.
There are three major assignments that are common to all subject studies modules. Each assignment contributes to trainee’s understanding of current educational issues and how these impact on schools and their progress as a developing teacher in schools. They have been designed to allow trainees the opportunity to demonstrate scholarship at (M) level 7. In total the 9000 words or equivalent are worth 60 M level credits
Subject Pedagogy Assignments:
1. Why teach your specialism?
This task has been designed both as a preparatory task for writing the R2R assignment and to allow you to demonstrate your ability, systematically and creatively, to integrate ideas and concepts from your studies to inform your personal beliefs.
When you are interviewed for your first teaching post, you might be asked for your views on the purpose of Education in your specialism and the contribution that you believe it makes to pupils and to schools. As a trainee you may be challenged by pupils to justify the relevance of the lesson content. It is, therefore, important that you are able to articulate a rationale for
Education in your specialism, and justify the place of your subject in the curriculum.
2. ‘School-based Research’ (SBR)
This assignment is intended to be a small-scale research project that starts with a theoretical enquiry and is then investigated using primary research into the practice observed in the school experience setting. It allows students to develop their views on the nature and purpose of education in their subject area and the contribution that they believe it makes to pupils and to schools. They produce an account of the ‘rhetoric’ that includes reference to their school’s policy documentation, statutory requirements and published guidelines, relevant literature including recommended reading, educational websites and journals.
Students then identify an aspect of their subject to investigate that includes a whole school dimension, allowing them to investigate both within and beyond their subject boundaries. trainees design a research plan that breaks the larger question down into smaller research questions and hypotheses and which they carry out in their placement school during the first school experience.
* full task descriptions, assessment outcomes and marking criteria are provided via UnihubMyLearning
Subject Education Assignment: The Monitoring and Assessment Project (M&A)
PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 31

This is an area of research and development in the trainee’s curriculum area. This is again closely linked to school experience and addresses key aspects of effective teaching including: o o o o o o o o pupil motivation; pupil learning, including setting appropriate learning objectives and outcomes; continuity and progression in pupil learning; creating a purposeful learning atmosphere; differentiation; teaching strategies (including the use of practical work, ICT, group work and developing pupils as independent learners)
Assessment for learning, including pupil self-assessment and how assessment is used to inform planning.
Assessment of learning, teacher effectiveness

The written presentation includes: o A module of work that includes an overview of how the module fits into the department’s curriculum plan. o An overview of the learning objectives of each unit and how interest and inclusion were planned for. o Detailed lesson plans and evaluations o Production of original resources to add variety of learning styles and inclusion (e.g. visual models; games; investigations; slide shows; challenges). o A review of best practice in assessment and assessment strategies for the module. o Examples of marked pupils’ work to include a range of ability from each class selected. o Examples of reports on pupils using the assessment data. o Overall evaluation on aspects of effective practice listed and showing analysis of the assessment and other performance data.
Trainees are required to relate the selected module content and learning objectives to current research in education.
* a full task description, assessment outcomes and marking criteria are provided via UnihubMyLearning
In addition to these formal assessments there is also a school-based Personalised Learning
(PLT) Task assignment that is a requirement of the course but not part of the formal assessment. * a full task description is provided via Unihub-MyLearning
Assessment of School Experience

The school-based programme is made up of two modules equivalent to 60 credits at level 6.
As well as passing all assignments, students must meet all the teaching standards in order to gain the award of PGCE Secondary Education by the final assessment board.
The assessment criteria for all courses leading to Qualified Teacher Status are now nationally specified and all schools and trainees are given the detailed revision of the
Standards.
The trainee’s subject mentor and the school co-ordinating mentor assess a trainee’s progress in the development of teaching skills using the ATS 2 form. Middlesex University
PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 32

have joined with all other London providers of initial teacher training to develop an assessment system based upon the new standards. This has been done at the recommendation of senior school staff to simplify the complex assessment of trainees from different providers. ATS1 and ATS2 conform to this common system of assessment.
Specialist external examiners visit the course as part of the University’s quality assurance procedures. Prior to their visit all ATS2 forms and other relevant evidence will be considered in making a final judgement on each trainee’s teaching standards. The external examiners then moderate a sample of trainees. This entails external examiners in the observation of trainees teaching and a discussion with the school mentors and the University subject leader.
Consistent with grading across the programme final assessment of teaching is graded on a 4 point scale. This is for quality assurance purposes: however at the final assessment board all that is recorded is simply ‘pass’ or ‘fail’ but the comprehensive profiling system forms a wealth of supporting information. Trainees who have failed to reach the necessary level of teaching standards will be considered individually and the secondary ITT assessment board will make a ruling on the period of further assessed school experience needed to re-sit the module. Trainees are reminded that there is no automatic right to re-sit a school experience module. If the assessment board are advised that school pupils could be at risk of being disadvantaged by the poor performance of a trainee then the trainee will be denied this opportunity. School based Assessment
Elements include: o o o o o Use of the appropriate standards linked guidance during lesson observation
Grading trainees
Mentor sessions, target setting
Supporting assignments
Targeted individual support

Use of the appropriate guidance during lesson observation and the assessment profiles allows tutors and mentors to provide feedback to trainees that develops a sense of progress and identifies targets in relation to the standards. Evidence of achievement against the standards is transferred from training records to the ATS form for review points where longer-term targets are identified.
Level descriptions of performance are shared with mentors and trainees. These have been mapped to the standards areas that are used for reporting in order to ensure that they are applied systematically and that the data resulting from assessments are rigorous and robust.
The use of these descriptors for assessment and reporting is discussed at mentor training sessions to ensure consistency and where possible, training mentors observe other trainees and discuss grades to support their understanding.
Weekly mentor meeting sheets have clear discussion points to focus the school-based training. Trainees are required to target specific standards each week, according to individual need. Mentor development sessions stress the use of the Teachers’ standards in observations and target setting and monitoring progress.
Trainees are required to continually update their ATS forms with evidence of attainment and are given time to do this, specifically after a school or university based assessment. They are given detailed guidance regarding a range of evidence and it is made explicit that this evidence should come from all elements of the training programme.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 33

The formal assessment of SBT 1 and 2 requires mentors to reflect on and judge trainees performance against the standards before pointing clear and specific ways forward to address gaps and areas of weakness. As part of their ITPs trainees devise action plans through self evaluation linked to their standards mapping and their knowledge audits.
The assessment procedure is reviewed annually following the end of the last academic programme, one of the advantages of a one-year course is that change can be initiated and introduced rapidly. Significant changes have been made to the assessment of school experience during this academic year. The ATS form that addresses the revised standards has been designed to allow a more holistic assessment of achievement against the standards. Groups of standards are defined more broadly to allow feedback to address linking themes such as the personalisation of learning, collaborative practice and the wellbeing of children.
School-based mentors are involved in supporting trainees throughout the M&A assignment and then in evaluating their work in a formative review.
Assessment Calendar

See section 2.5 above

3.4 Submission, receipt, marking and return of assessment
PGCE Specific Regulations

o o o o o

o o o o o

All assignments must be handed in on time. Failure to do this without medical certification and deferral approval will result in a fail grade.
All failing work that has been handed in up to the final hand in date will be returned to the student with some formative comments on how to improve the work and a resubmission date.
Assignments can only be resubmitted once and must reach the tutor by the notified resubmission date.
All assignments are marked on the 4-point grade scale that is detailed with specific success criteria outlined for each individual assignment.
Failure of school experience usually follows a review of a cause for concern procedure where adequate progress has not been made and targets not met. In exceptional circumstances, for example, professional reasons, it may be the case that a trainee will be asked to leave the placement without the procedure being instigated. If this is the case, it will be agreed between the school and the Director of
Secondary Programmes.
The maximum length of registration of the PGCE Secondary programme is two years according to university regulations.
If due to unforeseeable personal circumstances, trainees wish to interrupt their studies before assessment, they may interrupt their studies until the next academic year. Trainees must return to the same point of entry, for example; interruptions during
SBT 1 will be September, and during SBT 2, this will be end of January beginning
February.
Trainees who do not return from interruption at the agreed entry point the following year will automatically be withdrawn from the system by the university‘s “no show” process. Trainees will then have to reapply via UCAS if they wish to train again as a teacher.

Submission and receipt of coursework

You will find all the deadlines for your assessment (both formative and summative) in your assessment schedule and online in myUniHub.
PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 34

Instructions on how to submit your assessment is given in the each module handbook but this will either be electronically via myUniHub or in person at the UniHelp Desk.
Course work for PGCE Secondary should be submitted electronically by 09.30am on the morning of the submission date. Where necessary appendices can be submitted in hard copy. Marking and moderation

In line with the university regulations section M Code of Assessment Practice we operate a system of moderation for assessed work. A minimum of 10% of all coursework and is moderated. All coursework which is failed work is second marked.
The aim and purpose of moderation is to ensure consistency in the application of the assessment criteria. Its effectiveness is determined principally by the rigour of the procedures followed and these are listed below. Formal moderation meetings are planned and identified in the assessment calendar.
Standardisation. In advance of the moderation a sample of past trainee’s work is matched to the marking rubric. A group discussion on standards takes place at the standardisation meeting. These sessions serve as induction for new tutors and enable experienced tutors to refine their common understanding of the assessment and grade criteria.
Moderation meetings then begin with discussion of the current cohort’s responses to the task.
These discussions are recorded and inform annual revisions of assessment guidelines and practice. This is followed by a workshop session during which tutors moderate work samples
(a minimum of 10%) and the programme leader reviews any work deemed to be failing to meet the pass criteria.
Return of coursework

University policy is not to hand back course work. You are expected to keep somewhere safe a copy of all your coursework submissions.

3.5 Assessment Feedback
Assessment is an integral part of learning and you may hear it referred to as formative or summative. Formative assessment is developmental in nature and designed to give you feedback on your performance and how it can be improved. As a result you will get detailed feedback on formative assessment but not a grade. Formative assessment is an important part of the learning process and has been shown to contribute to enhancement of learning and the raising of standards.
You will receive feedback from tutors and your fellow students throughout the course both in
University through group activity and tutorials and in school through peer coaching and guidance from mentors and tutors. The Why Teach? assignment is taken in and marked early so that diagnostic feedback from tutors can be used formatively to prepare for writing the School-based Research SBR assignment. The SBR assignment involves formative peer assessment. Summative assessment is designed to measure the extent to which you have achieved the intended learning outcomes of a module and therefore the appropriate grade to be awarded.
Summative assessment should assess achievement of all learning outcomes in a secure,

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 35

fair and accurate manner and on this programme comprises the School-based Research
(SBR) and the Monitoring and Assessment (M&A) assignments and your performance in school which is assessed using the Assessment of Teaching Standards (ATS) form.
Assessment may also involve self, peer or group approaches. For example, you may be asked to self-assess your own work, indicating where you feel you have clearly demonstrated your understanding and also identifying areas where can see you have room to improve. Assessment may also be a peer process where students, individually or as groups, offer feedback on one another’s work. Group assessment may also be part of your programme where part of the assessment requires you to demonstrate your ability to work as part of a group and possibly receive a group mark.
Feedback on your assessment (both formative and summative) provides the opportunity for you to reflect and to use the feedback as the basis for learning and to improve your work.
Feedback can take many forms and may be informal. For example it may be given and discussed orally in the classroom, or it may be more formal and delivered in written or audio form from academic staff or fellow students. Understanding your feedback is very important and to achieve this you are encouraged to discuss feedback with your peers and academic staff. Receiving feedback on your work is an essential and important part of learning and therefore all programmes provide regular opportunities for formative assessment the purpose of which is to get detailed feedback on your performance so you get a regular update on how you are developing and to prepare you for any summative assessment.
Feedback on summative assessment will be offered in a variety of forms and all your work will be marked and moderated in line with the Code of Assessment Practice which can be found in section M of the University Regulations: http://www.mdx.ac.uk/regulations
You will normally be provided with feedback within 15 working days of the published submission date.

3.6 Progressing on your programme
Academic Levels

Each module that you take will have one of the academic levels below assigned to it:
Academic level

Description

6

Honours level (e.g. BA, BSc)

7

Masters level (e.g. MA, MSc)

Academic levels reflect how complex and demanding the learning will be as well as the depth of study and how independent you are expected to be as a learner. The University module level descriptors describe the characteristics of each academic level at Middlesex and can be found in section M of the University Regulations; http://www.mdx.ac.uk/regulations. The PGCE at Middlesex is unclassified; it is a pass/fail award within which trainees are required to gain a pass grade in all modules. For coursework assignments however trainees receive an indicative summary grade on a 4 point scale and written feedback of a formative nature. PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 36

The Four Point Scale

The 4 point scale has been used for some time to give a quality grading to trainees performance in teaching and is required by Ofsted when moderating standards as part of the inspection process. In the interests of all associated with the PGCE programme we have adopted this 4 point scale grading system across the Programme.
1
2
3
4

Distinction
Merit
Pass
Fail

Very good or excellent features.
Mostly good or better
All features at least satisfactory
Not reaching the quality required

If you have any questions about what your grades or status mean then you should look at the Assessment and Regulations pages on UniHub http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/study/assess first and then talk to your Student Achievement Officer.
Level 7ness within the subject modules

In order to attain a pass within the modules it is necessary for trainees to demonstrate more than simply recording and reporting information. In order to reach level 7, assignments are required to demonstrate analysis and critical reflection with the ability to communicate effectively the trainee’s intention related to the application of their specialist subject area in school. Students are required to demonstrate recording of information which is reported upon and researched in an analytical way (with supportive reading, observation and anecdotal evidence to support their knowledge, skill and understanding of their subject specialism), and then reflected upon with specific reference to reading, research, university and school based study.
In line with the Descriptor for a qualification at Masters (M) level 7: Masters Degree work must display mastery of a complex and specialised area of knowledge and skills, employing advanced skills to conduct research, or advanced technical or professional activity, accepting accountability for related decision making including use of supervision.
Level descriptors

Intellectual skills and attributes
• Knowledge Display mastery of a complex and specialised area of knowledge and skills.
• Skills Demonstrate expertise in highly specialised and advanced technical, professional and/or research skills.
The most significant characteristic is the exploration of boundaries where preceding levels focused on knowledge and skills within them.
Processes




Process Conduct research, or advanced technical or professional activity.
Role and function Design and apply appropriate research methodologies.
Communicate results of research to peers.
Highly complex tasks and procedures are featured at this level.

Accountability
• Autonomy Accept accountability in related decision-making, including use of supervision. • Accountability is usually to peers rather than to superiors.
• The learner is responsible for initiating supervisory and peer support contacts.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 37

Re-assessment of subject studies modules

Although no one anticipates failing a module, it is important that you are aware of what happens if you do. Normally you would be entitled to one re-assessment opportunity if you don’t pass and there is no financial cost associated with this second attempt. You should however consult the Your Study area on UniHub for more information http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/study/assess/progression or contact your course administrator or student achievement advisor (heachievement@mdx.ac.uk)
The Your Study pages on UniHub (http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk) contain useful information on some of the following areas:
• what happens if you don’t pass (re-assessment),
• progression,
• deferrals,
• extenuating circumstances,
• results,
• coursework
• exams
If you have any questions about what your grades or status mean then you should look at these pages first and/or talk to your student achievement officer.
Retaking School Experience Modules
Although no one anticipates failing a module, it is important that you are aware of what happens if you do. In the case of failing a School Experience module, the opportunity to resit the module is granted by the Assessment Board. You would be notified of this decision by letter from the Director of Programmes. As with other re-assessment opportunities, you would be entitled to re-sit the School Experience without financial cost associated with this second attempt however in this eventuality you are advised to consult with the Middlesex
Student Finance Office or contact your course administrator or student achievement advisor.
To support you in the reassessment of School Experience you are required to do the reassessment support task outlined below at the end of this section.
Assessment Boards and results
At the end of the course your results will be considered and confirmed by an Assessment
Board and if you have successfully completed all your assessment you will be able to graduate. Once the Assessment Board has met you will be able to view your results and progression status on the My Study page of UniHub;https://myunihub.mdx.ac.uk/web/homecommunity/mystudy. If any results are still provisional then they will be clearly labelled as such. You can find out more information about Assessment Boards on the Your Study pages on UniHubhttp://unihub.mdx.ac.uk
The date for the release of results and progression decisions is published in the academic calendar and can be found at the start of this handbook.
Deferral of assessment

If there are exceptional circumstances which through no fault of your own are preventing you from completing all or some of your assessment (e.g. submitting coursework) you may seek permission to defer the relevant assessment to the next available opportunity. If you think this applies to you then you should first read the full Deferral Policy which is available in the
Assessment and Regulations section of the Your Study area on UniHub: http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/study/assess/Deferral. PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 38

Deferral requests should be submitted to the UniHelp desk by completing the relevant form and attaching supporting documentation, e.g. medical certificates. The final deadline for deferral applications is 2 weeks after the end of the exam period (the dates of which are in the academic calendar at the start of this handbook). The deferral form is available from the
Admin and Finances section of myUniHub: https://myunihub.mdx.ac.uk/web/homecommunity/myadminandfinances.
If you have any questions about deferrals please your course administrator.
If you have difficulties accessing resources (e.g. access to the University network and
UniHub) after deferral, contact the UniHelp Desk at http://webhelpdesk.mdx.ac.uk.
Extenuating Circumstances

If you do not wish to defer your assessment, but are concerned that exceptional personal circumstances (e.g. ill health) might affect your performance in assessment, you can submit a claim for extenuating circumstances. Your circumstances will be kept confidential but will be summarised by the School’s Assessment Officer and brought to the attention of the appropriate Assessment Board. If you think this applies to you then you should read first read the information in the Assessment and Regulations section of the Your Study area on
UniHub: http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/study/assess/extenuating
It is important to note that extenuating circumstances are only considered when determining the progression or final classification of borderline students. They cannot be used to change the grade of a module.
Claims for extenuating circumstances should be submitted to the UniHelp Desk (ground floor of the Sheppard Library) by completing the relevant form and attaching supporting documentation, e.g. medical certificates. The final deadline for submission of extenuating circumstances forms with supporting documentation is the last date of the examination period. The extenuating circumstances form is available from the Admin and Finances section of myUniHub: https://myunihub.mdx.ac.uk/web/homecommunity/myadminandfinances
If you have any questions about extenuating circumstances please your course administrator. Results

At the end of each academic year your module grades will be considered and confirmed by an Assessment Board and if you have successfully completed all your assessment you will be able to graduate.
Once the Assessment Board has met you will be able to view your results and progression status in the My Study area on myUniHub; https://myunihub.mdx.ac.uk/web/homecommunity/mystudy. If any results are still provisional then they will be clearly labelled as such. The date for the release of results and progression decisions is on the Academic Calendar which can be found at the start of this handbook or at http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/mdx/calendar/index.aspx. Certificates
When you graduate your final qualification certificate will be issued by the University and contain details of your qualification. Your certificate will be sent to you within 4 months of the date the qualification is awarded (usually the relevant Assessment Board date) and therefore

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 39

it is very important that you keep your address details up to date if they change at any point.
You can do this via the Admin and Finance section on myUniHub: https://myunihub.mdx.ac.uk/web/home-community/myadminandfinances Full details of the information that will appear on your certificate are set out in the Middlesex
Regulations, section E13.5: http://www.mdx.ac.uk/regulations
Interruption from studies or withdrawal from the programme
1. Interruption and withdrawal (and supplement) forms must be completed by the trainee with the University Tutor at an exit interview.
2. Interruption and Withdrawal forms are available from the tutor (annexes 2 and
3) and are also supplied by the UniHelp desk.
3. Trainee has the option to meet with the Secondary Programme Director or
Programme Administrator if tick “other” on the form
4. Trainee to complete supplement form, if tick “other”
5. Trainees must return from interruption the following academic year and must complete within two years of first registration of their programme. If they do not return they will need to re apply via UCAS.
6. Trainees who do not return will be withdrawn as part of the University’s ‘no show’ regulation.
7. Students who interrupt before assessment will incur fee liabilities up to the point of interruption and incur further fee liabilities when return from the interruption. 8. Student must ascertain their fee liability with the Middlesex Student Finance team. Information on how to be in contact with Middlesex Student Finance can be found at http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/your-support-services/fees-paymentsfunding.
9. Form to be date stamped by Lucy Pompeus, Sec PGCE administrator and sent on to the Student Records Team.
10. Copy of form must be returned to student at the time of completion.
11. Date stamp on the form is taken as point of interruption and will calculate any fee liability.
NB1 - trainees who interrupt during a Progress Support Plan will be marked with a
Fail grade at the next assessment board.
NB2 - trainees must provide evidence such as a doctor certificate to support an interruption where appropriate.
The maximum length of registration of the PGCE Secondary programme is two years according to university regulations. If due to unforeseeable personal circumstances, students wish to interrupt their studies before assessment, they may interrupt their studies until the next academic year.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 40

Trainees who do not return from interruption at the agreed entry point the following year will automatically be withdrawn from the system by the university‘s “no show” process.
Trainees will then have to reapply via UCAS if they wish to train again as a teacher.
Students will usually return to the same point of entry, for example; interruptions during SBT
1 this will be September, and during SBT 2, this will be February. In order to support trainees in the reassessment of SBT 2 they are required to do a reassessment support task. They need to complete this task within the time frame indicated in order to begin retaking SE2 in
February.
School Experience Reassessment Support Task
To support you in the reassessment of school experience you are required to do the reassessment support task outlined below. You must do this task within the time frame indicated below in order to begin retaking SE2 in Feb 2017.
Task Description


You should organise your own pre placement (a minimum of 15 days) in a secondary school during the autumn term 2016. Your programme leader will need to approve the placement and will offer guidance as necessary.



You will need to keep a record of your attendance in school (see page 2).



You need to make a list of your strengths and weaknesses from past training records.
These will come from lesson observations, mentor sessions, ATS and PSP documents as well as your own reflections. This should be signed by your Pathway tutor before you start your 15 days in school (see page 3).



You will keep a journal of what you observe and do in school. There should be one entry for each of the days you spend in school.



For each of your weak areas do an observation that specifically focuses on that aspect
e.g. strategies for behaviour management, feedback to children, questioning, expositions etc. Clearly state what the observation is focussing on and evaluate what you have learned from the observation that you will put into practice when you redo SE2. You should use the observation form (see page 4). You must complete 5 formal observations.



If the school is willing to let you, please plan and teach a few lessons that will give you the opportunity to address some of the areas of weakness you have identified. It would be really helpful if the class teacher can observe you teach the lessons and comment on the plans. You should then write an evaluation for these lessons using the guidance in the trainee Requirements booklet.

You must submit your record of your days in school with the notes that you have made.
We hope that you enjoy this experience and feel that it will help you to prepare for your SE2 reassessment opportunity.

SBT Reassessment Support Task
Record of visits to school
Name

Contact

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 41

Trainee
School/ LEA
Mentor
Coordinating mentor
Headteacher
Date

Signature to confirm attendance Name

Position

The trainee has successfully completed the EDS 3112 Reassessment Support Task and should be placed in school to retake school experience 2.
Signed:

Programme Leader:

Date:

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 42

Areas of Strength and Targets from first attempt of SBT 2
Read all of the feedback that you received from your tutor and mentor during your first attempt on SBT 2. Identify your areas of strength and targets, list them in the table below.
Read your lesson evaluations and reflect on your strengths and targets- add these to the table. Standard

Strengths

Targets

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Part Two

Signed Programme Leader:
Date:

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 43

Trainee observation form
You must use this form to complete 5 formal observations during the 15 days.
You should use this form when observing your class teacher or another teacher in school.
You should make notes of your observations. A simple proforma using the headings (bold) below can be used.
Focus for the observation
• The focus for the observation should be based on the targets set by your class teacher and mentor and your evaluations of your own teaching on your first attempt of SBT2. You should discuss the focus with your class teacher.
• This should be written in the form of a question
Observation notes
Write brief notes of what your have observed – relate these to your question
What I have learned from the observation and how I will implement it my teaching
Try to answer your question. Indicate how you will use what your have learned in your own teaching. Discuss this with others e.g. your class teacher or subject leaders
Further questions
Has the observation thrown up any related questions? These will be the focus for further observations. Discuss this with others e.g. your class teacher or subject leaders

3.7 Academic misconduct
Plagiarism is the presentation by a student of a body of material (written, visual or oral) as his or her own work which is wholly or partly the work of another. Plagiarism also extends to cover your own work previously assessed or published which is also required to be properly referenced. Taking unfair advantage over other authors, students or oneself in this way is considered by the University to be a serious offence.
The University takes serious action against any student who plagiarises whether through negligence, foolishness or deliberate intent. Therefore make sure written material, ideas, theories, formulae etc are acknowledged through the use of quotation marks, references and bibliographies. Information on the correct way of referencing and acknowledging work from other sources is available on the Your Study pages on UniHub; http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/study/academicpractice Academic misconduct also covers examinations. You should ensure that you read the exam regulations before attending your exams to ensure you know what is expected of you and what is permitted. These can be found in the Your Study section of UniHub: http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/study/exams/regs PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 44

It is important that you are aware of what constitutes academic misconduct and section F of the University Regulations gives this in full: http://www.mdx.ac.uk/regulations
If you have any questions regarding plagiarism or academic misconduct then please contact
Judith Goldberg on J.Goldberg@mdx.ac.uk

3.8 Appeals
All students are able to appeal against Assessment Board decisions and the outcome of academic misconduct cases. The regulations for appeals are set out in Section G of the
University Regulations: http://www.mdx.ac.uk/regulations.
If you are considering submitting an appeal against an Assessment Board decision then please consult the guidance on UniHub http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/study/assess/appeals.
You can also contact the student welfare team in MUSU for advice or support: http://www.musu.mdx.ac.uk/swirl_academic PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 45

4.SUPPORT
Although you are expected to be independent and to take responsibility for your own academic and personal life, there is still a lot of help available to support you throughout your programme. 4.1 Academic Support
Academic staff

Your tutors will direct your studies and ensure that you know what work you need to cover in any given module. Seek advice from academic staff either during their office hours or by email or telephone.
Support for academic writing

Support for writing assignments includes:
• Formative feedback
• Staged deadlines and workload
• Targeted individual support through tutorials
• Additional support targeted at special needs
Formative assessment is a key feature of practice at the first assessment point where tutors aim for a ‘written dialogue’ with trainees commenting positively on their achievements, correcting errors of understanding and challenging their views to extend their understanding and to become more analytical about teaching and learning. The first assignment is therefore diagnostic with feedback but must become a “pass” within a deadline agreed with the subject leader.
The assessment and feedback template ensures that tutors assess the quality of response in terms of the intellectual skills and attributes, processes and accountability appropriate to work at Master’s level.
Tutors aim to be clear concise and helpful to improve trainee’s professional practice and trainees can then build on the tutor’s comments to improve their performance.
Detailed assessment criteria are available to trainees through the VLE that students can use in conjunction with guidance on presentation and structure to develop their responses to the appropriate level. All programmes use a system of applying these criteria systematically for marking and providing formative feedback to students. In order to support trainees achieve level 4 in written assignments, assessment criteria have been mapped onto rubrics that trainees can use in peer and self review and tutors use for focussed and specific feedback.
A peer and self-review process has been adopted across the programmes as a requirement of the task.
Clear and concise guidance for academic writing is provided via the VLE (MyUniHub+) and this is further supported by the LDU Learner Development Unit who offer help to subjects on academic writing at level 4. In addition, individual appointmements are provided for PGCE trainees where required to support them in their assignment writing.

Each module includes the requirement of formally assessed work although non-assessed work may also be required. Assessment criteria are issued with each assignment.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 46

Student Achievement Officer Support

In addition to the support available to you via academic staff and staff at the UniHelp Desk, your Student Achievement Officer is your first point of contact for queries regarding your programme and will either help you to deal with those issues directly or will refer you to who you need to see. In addition you can get valuable guidance on time management, planning your studies, preparing for assessment and tips on revision and exam technique.
The Student Achievement Officer can also help you with the extenuating circumstances and deferral processes (including advising on evidence) although these are ultimately dealt with by the School Assessment Officer (see below).
Assessment Officer Support

Assessment is an important aspect to your programme but you may find that at times personal circumstances can impact on your studies. Should you have circumstances which mean you need to defer your assessment you will find valuable guidance on the Your Study pages of UniHub, but you can also contact the assessment officers who will guide you through the process.

4.2 Support services around the University
Information on UniHub

There are a number of dedicated support services which are available to you as a student which range from support with your studies to support with various aspects of your personal life. Using UniHub you can find out what is on offer, access any online resources and even book appointments.


Support services http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/support including: o Counselling, o Financial support, o International student support o Health and wellbeing o Disability support (see details below) o Childcare o Religious needs



Academic support: http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/study including: o Learner Development Unit, o Library and IT resources, o Exams o Assessment and regulations o Academic practice o Summer school o Study methods o Module registration o Attendance and withdrawal

Disability and Dyslexia support

We aim to provide an inclusive teaching and learning environment, which caters for all students. This includes students who disclose:
• Autistic Spectrum Disorder including Asperger Syndrome
• Hearing Impairment
• Medical condition
• Mobility difficulties, including difficulty writing

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 47

• Ongoing mental health conditions
• Specific learning difficulties – e.g., dyslexia or dyspraxia
• Visual impairment
This is not an exhaustive list. If you think you have a support need that may affect your study, and you would like to discuss it, please get in touch directly to book an appointment
(disability@mdx.ac.uk). Alternatively, you can contact Alex Suthern, the dedicated PGCE course tutor who oversees this (a.suthern@mdx.ac.uk).
Our service
The type of support that might be available includes, but is not limited to:
• Ensuring that your teaching areas are accessible to you
• Providing learning materials in the appropriate format
• Receiving extra time in exams and in-class assessments
• More time to complete your coursework
• Longer loan periods for your library books
• Being able to audio record your lectures
• Undertake assessments for students applying for the Disabled Students' Allowance (DSA)
Disclosure
There are several different stages you can choose to disclose a disability at Middlesex
University. You can disclose on your UCAS application or once you have enrolled at the
University. In order to ensure you are supported appropriately it is best to disclose as early as you can.

UniHelp Desk

If you have any enquiries about any aspect of your life as a student at Middlesex, you can ask at the UniHelp Desk situated on the ground floor of the Sheppard Library. UniHelp
Advisors offer information and support on all aspects of the University including








programme administration student records money and welfare services finance matters library IT and information enquiries access to other university services

In fact, you can ask us about anything. If we can’t help you straightaway or you need more detailed advice we’ll arrange for you to see a specialist or direct you to appropriate workshops, drop-in sessions etc. Depending on the time of year there may also be specific places on the UniHelp Desk for immediate specialist advice.
The UniHelp Desk is also the central place for the submission and receipt of printed coursework which is not otherwise submitted electronically. The UniHelp Desk is open all through the year and for seven days a week during term-time.
Middlesex University Students’ Union (MDXSU)

MDXSU provides a number services, activities and projects. These include
• financial and resource support for student clubs and societies,
• welfare and academic advice, referral, representation and campaigning via SWIRL
(Student Welfare & International Resource Lounge),

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 48





the student rep scheme, which provides a formal and organised system of feedback on course provision, an online radio station with shows entirely hosted by student presenters (MUD
Radio)
a monthly magazine written and edited by current (sometimes former) Middlesex students (MUD Magazine)

The Union also runs a number of events and activities throughout the year including society, cultural and social event nights, the Freshers’ Fairs during Induction Week, the MUSU Star
Awards Ceremony an annual celebration of student volunteering plus many more.
More information about MDXSU is available on line at: http://www.musu.mdx.ac.uk

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 49

5. Programme Specification and Curriculum Map for Secondary PGCE
1. Programme title
2. Awarding institution
3. Teaching institution
4. Programme accredited by
5. Final qualification

PGCE Secondary Education
Middlesex University
Middlesex University

PGCE Secondary Education: Business Studies
PGCE Secondary Education: Citizenship
PGCE Secondary Education: Computer Science with ICT
PGCE Secondary Education: Drama with English
PGCE Secondary Education: English
PGCE Secondary Education: Geography
PGCE Secondary Education: Maths
PGCE Secondary Education: Music
PGCE Secondary Education: Science with Biology,
PGCE Secondary Education: Science with Chemistry
PGCE Secondary Education: Science with Physics
6. Academic year
2015-16
7. Language of study
English
8. Mode of study
Full time
9. Criteria for admission to the programme
Applicants are required to meet the entry requirements set out in the Initial Teacher
Training Criteria 2012 document available on-line from the Department for Education http://www.education.gsi.gov.uk/ITTcriteria Applicants are required to have:
• a standard equivalent to a grade C in the GCSE examination in English and mathematics • a first degree of a United Kingdom higher education institution or equivalent qualification. • passed the NCTL’s Literacy and Numeracy Skills Tests
• been subject to a Disclosure and Barring Service enhanced disclosure check and/or any other appropriate background check.
• taken part in an interview designed to assess their suitability to teach by determining. (a) if they have the intellectual and academic capabilities needed to meet the required standards
(b) if they possess the appropriate qualities, attitudes and values expected of a teacher
(c) if they can read effectively and are able to communicate clearly and accurately in Standard English
(d) if they have met the Secretary of State’s requirements for health and physical capacity to teach.
10. Aims of the programme
The aim of the programme is to meet the Teachers’ Standards and prepare students for the teaching profession. The programme will enable students to demonstrate critical understanding of current research and advanced scholarship in the area of secondary education and to demonstrate expertise in highly specialised professional skills in a

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2012/13

Page 50

context where they will need to exercise initiative and take personal responsibility for decision making in complex and unpredictable situations. Students will develop the knowledge and understanding of the secondary curriculum for their subject and pedagogic knowledge, understanding and skills to teach effectively across the age and ability range of the secondary school. They will develop their knowledge and understanding of pupils and their learning and be able to critically evaluate and respond to the diverse needs of children in multicultural, multilingual and multi-faith settings. trainees will learn to develop a mutually respectful partnership with pupils, their homes and communities and a commitment to learn from these together with an understanding of the role of parents, carers, families and social, ethnic, linguistic, faith and other communities in children’s learning.
On placement they will work within a secondary school as members of staff; to understand the interdependency of the whole staff and the roles and responsibilities of teachers with respect to their classroom duties and their responsibilities to the governors, head teachers, teachers, parents and pupils and to other professional agencies that provide education and care for young children.
In order to fulfil the aims on the programmes trainees will develop a detailed and up to date knowledge of the National Curriculum and current developments in education and confidence and competence in the management of the children’s learning, based on knowledge and understanding of the children’s motivation, needs, abilities and aptitudes.
They will learn to plan for, teach and assess children across the age and ability range and to organise and manage a class in relation to the achievement of appropriate educational goals. By reflecting on their own teaching and that of others they will develop an inquiring and critical approach and be able to adapt and modify approaches in the light of changing needs and demands drawing on recent research and scholarship.
Through their awareness of the teachers’ professional and statutory responsibilities including health and safety issues related to teaching their subject specialism they will understand and develop a commitment to the rights of children and colleagues in relation to equality issues
11. Programme outcomes
A. Knowledge and understanding
The successful student will have knowledge and understanding of:
1. Current debates in Secondary Education and in their subject specialism particularly in relation to the requirements of curriculum models used in school including the National
Curriculum.
2. The classroom and school setting in a diverse society and how schools and their own teaching practice can promote social inclusion.
3. Current theoretical developments in Secondary
Education as a whole and in the subject specialism in particular.
4. The requirements of the current regulations for the award of QTS.
5. The key policies and practices relating to working within the selected secondary school

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Teaching/learning methods
Students learn by a variety of methods including reading, discussion, listening, practical activities, accessing ICT and self directed scholarly activity.
Assessment Method
Students’ knowledge and understanding is assessed by:
Coursework;
Scrutiny of their teaching files;
Observation of the students’ teaching and evaluative discussions with course tutors and school based mentors and teachers. Page 51

environment and how these link to the theoretical perspectives presented at university. 6. The National Curriculum and other relevant educational statutory and non-statutory guidance. 7. The specialist secondary subject content sufficient to meet the requirements of the
Teachers’ Standards for the award of QTS.
8. The National Curriculum and current developments in educational policy and guidance as well as relevant exam syllabuses in the specialism.
9. The professional requirements and statutory responsibilities of the teaching profession as outlined in part two of the Teachers’ Standards for the award of QTS
B. Cognitive (thinking) skills
On completion of this programme the successful student will be able to:
1. Critically reflect on and evaluate their own teaching in the light of current theoretical developments in Secondary Education as a whole and in the subject specialism in particular. 2. Analyse research data and critically evaluate how research has contributed to the knowledge and understanding of how to teach effectively.
3. Develop a reasoned argument and challenge assumptions. 4. Develop a creative and constructively critical approach towards innovation.
5. Critically reflect on the teaching and assessment of their specialist subject and evaluate their own practice in the light of current theoretical developments.
6. Demonstrate a critical awareness of current problems and of new insights, and make decisions in complex, unpredictable situations.
7. Reflect critically on classroom observations to inform subsequent learning and teaching.
8. Reflect critically on their planning and teaching and identify action to improve practice.
9. Critically evaluate the key policies and practices relating to working within the secondary school environment, linking these to the theoretical perspectives presented at university, current education policy and alternative school settings.
C. Practical skills
On completion of the programme the successful student will:

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Teaching/learning methods
Students learn cognitive skills through by regularly undertaking focused evaluative observation tasks, and discussion with tutors and their peers and schoolbased mentors and course tutors. Assessment Method
Students’ cognitive skills are assessed by:
The scrutiny of their teaching files along with written assignments which challenge assumptions and on-going selfevaluation and collaborative evaluation of school experience.

Teaching/learning methods
Students learn practical skills through: Regular practice of

Page 52

1. Acquire the skills and employ the processes necessary to carry out an effective small scale educational research project.
2. Develop effective formative and summative assessment strategies to monitor and enhance pupil progress.
3. Develop and adapt effective teaching resources and schemes of work to plan and teach effective lessons in the subject specialism. 4. Develop strategies for enhancing education in the specialism within and beyond the school setting emphasising active learning pedagogy.
5. Develop effective practice in planning for, teaching and assessing children across the 1116, 11-18 or 14-19 age range as appropriate.
6. Organise and manage a class in relation to the achievement of appropriate educational goals.
7. Develop confidence and competence in the management of the children’s learning, based on knowledge and understanding of the children’s motivation, needs, abilities and aptitude. 8. Work constructively and collaboratively with the variety of professional colleagues, parents and carers.
9. Contribute to the wider life of the school they are placed in.

these skills and critical reflection on their skills acquisition.
Assessment Method
Students’ practical skills are assessed by scrutiny of the students’ teaching files.
Observation of the students teaching including the effective use of artefacts in the classroom and evaluative discussion with course tutors and school-based mentors and teachers. 12. Programme structure (levels, modules, credits and progression requirements)
12. 1 Overall structure of the programme
The programme comprises 180 days in total studied over one year (full time) and complies fully with the current requirements of Initial Teacher Training (ITT) providers that apply to all programmes commencing 1 September 2007, imposed by the (then)
Secretary of State under the Education (School Teachers' Qualifications (England))
Regulations 2003, made under sections 132, 145 and 210 of the Education Act 2002.
Students spend at least 120 days in schools that include two school experiences in which they teach for approximately 60% of the timetable. Each placement has a block element to provide students with a sustained teaching experience over the complete teaching week. The rest of the programme, 60 days, is university based, where students attend lectures, seminars and practical workshops. The programme comprises 4 compulsory modules.
School Experience One (20 credits level 6), School Experience Two (40 credits level 6)
Subject Pedagogy (40 credits at level 7) and Specialism* Education (20 credits at level 7)
12.2 Levels and modules
This section should contain a more detailed description level-by-level of the programme structure, modules, credits and awards, there would be row for each level of an award).
Note that all modules will be determined to be compulsory, designated or optional with regard to any programmes, or major/minor subjects, of which they are a part.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 53

All modules are compulsory. Students take the following modules that make up the programme: *Please note that specialism above and below refers to a specific subject pathway EDS 3111
School Experience 1
20 Credits Level 6
Autumn Semester
EDS 3112
School Experience 2
40 Credits Level 6
Spring Semester
EDS 4200
SUBJECT Pedagogy
40 Credits Level 7
Autumn Semester
EDS 4201 –
(Specialism*) Education
20 Credits Level 7
Spring Semester
13 and 4265
12.3 Non-compensatable modules (note statement in 12.2 regarding FHEQ levels)
All modules are non-compensatable.
13. A curriculum map relating learning outcomes to modules
All of the learning outcomes are mapped through each individual module following this programme specification. The curriculum map follows this section.
14. Information about assessment regulations
To gain the award of PGCE Secondary Education: (Specialism), students must pass all assignments and meet all of the Teachers’ Standards 2012 at a minimum standard.
Please note that students cannot start their Induction Year unless they have been recommended for QTS. Students may take up a post without QTS, but only at the discretion of the Head teacher.
15. Placement opportunities, requirements and support (if applicable)
Placements in two secondary schools are a requirement of this initial teacher-training route.
The placements should provide a contrast in terms of teaching opportunities across the designation of the course.
16. Future careers (if applicable)
This programme leads to Qualified Teacher Status. Sessions on applying for first teaching posts is a feature of return week in January each year.
17. Particular support for learning (if applicable)
Students are able to access support for academic writing and for literacy and numeracy, provided by LDU. Also, there will be subject specific sessions relating numeracy and literacy to the broader curriculum of the student subject specialism.
18. JACS code (or other relevant coding system) 19. Relevant QAA subject benchmark group(s) X130 for all pathways
N/A

20. Reference points
The following reference points were used in designing the programme:
All ITT providers are required to comply with the financial memorandum and funding manuals received from the NCTL, and with all relevant legislation.
The initial teacher training (ITT) requirements that apply to all programmes commencing 1
September 2007 were imposed by the (then) Secretary of State under the Education (School

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 54

Teachers' Qualifications) (England) Regulations 2003, made under sections 132, 145 and 210 of the Education Act 2002. They have the same legal standing as, and replace Qualifying to
Teach. They set out, in sections 2.1-2.9 and 3.1-3.7, the training requirements and the management and quality assurance requirements for training providers and those who make recommendations for the award of QTS.
The Teachers’ Standards 2012
Training our next generation of outstanding teachers DfE June 2011 Implementation Plan DfE
Nov 2011
The Bristol Guide 2014 provides a clear overview of the law and statutory frameworks which are most relevant to the professional responsibilities and duties of teachers.
The QAA safeguarding standards :Code of practice for the assurance of academic quality and standards in higher education - Section 9: Work-based and placement learning
21. Other information
Please note programme specifications provide a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve if s/he takes full advantage of the learning opportunities that are provided. More detailed information about the programme can be found in the Student Programme Handbook, the School Experience Handbook, the Subject Handbooks and the University Regulations.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 55

Curriculum map for Secondary PGCE
This section shows the highest level at which programme outcomes are to be achieved by all graduates, and maps programme learning outcomes against the modules in which they are assessed. Programme learning outcomes
Knowledge and understanding
A1 Develop a critical and evaluative perspective on current debates in
Secondary Education and in the subject specialism. A2

A3

A4

Develop an understanding of the classroom and school setting in a diverse society and how schools and their own teaching practice can promote social inclusion.
Develop critical and evaluative perspectives on the National Curriculum and on current debates in the secondary education subject specialism using theoretical understandings and practical experience of teaching the specialism in school
Know the requirements of the current regulations for the award of QTS

Practical skills
C1 Acquire the skills and employ the processes necessary to carry out an effective small scale educational research project C2 Develop effective formative and summative assessment strategies to monitor and enhance pupil progress
C3 Develop and adapt effective teaching resources and schemes of work to plan and teach effective lessons in the subject specialism
C4

Develop strategies for enhancing education in the specialism within and beyond the school setting, emphasising active learning pedagogy

Understand the key policies and practices relating to working within the selected secondary school environment, linking these to the theoretical perspectives presented at university.
Develop knowledge of the National
Curriculum and current educational policy/guidance. C5

Develop effective practice in planning for, teaching and assessing children across the
11-16, 11-18 or 14-19 age range as appropriate
Organise and manage a class in relation to the achievement of appropriate educational goals

A7

Demonstrate the knowledge requirements to meet the Teachers’ Standards for the award of QTS

C7

A8

A secure knowledge of the National
Curriculum and current developments in educational policy and guidance as well as relevant exam syllabuses in the specialism
Understand and fulfil the professional requirements and statutory responsibilities of the teaching profession as outlined in part two of the Teachers’ Standards for the award of QTS

C8

A5

A6

A9

C6

C9

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Develop confidence and competence in the management of the children’s learning, based on knowledge and understanding of the children’s motivation, needs, abilities and aptitude Work constructively and collaboratively with the variety of professional colleagues, parents and carers
Contribute to the wider life of the school they are placed in.

Page 56

B1

B2

B3
B4
B5

B6

B7

B8
B9

Critically reflect on and evaluate their own teaching in the light of current theoretical developments in Secondary Education as a whole and in the subject specialism in particular Analyse research data and critically evaluate how research has contributed to the knowledge and understanding of how to teach effectively
Develop a reasoned argument and challenge assumptions
Develop a creative and constructively critical approach towards innovation
Critically reflect on the teaching and assessment of their specialist subject and evaluate their own practice in the light of current theoretical developments
Demonstrate a critical awareness of current problems and of new insights, and make decisions in complex, unpredictable situations Reflect critically on classroom observations to inform subsequent learning and teaching
Reflect critically on their planning and teaching and identify action to improve practice Critically evaluate the key policies and practices relating to working within the secondary school environment, linking these to the theoretical perspectives presented at university, current education policy and alternative school settings

Programme outcomes
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
Highest level achieved by all graduates
7
7
7
7
7
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
Highest level achieved by all graduates
7
7
7
7
7
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
Highest level achieved by all graduates
7
7
7
7
6
Module Title

School
Experience 1

Module
Code
and
Level
EDS
3111

A1

A2

A3

A6

A7

A8

A9

7
B6

6
B7

6
B8

6
B9

6
C6

6
C7

6
C8

6
C9

6

6

6

6

A4

A5

A6

ü

ü

ü

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

A7

A8

A9 ü Page 57

School
Experience 2
SUBJECT
Pedagogy
(Specialism*)
Education
Module Title

School
Experience 1
School
Experience 2
SUBJECT
Pedagogy
(Specialism*)
Education
Module Title

School
Experience 1
School
Experience 2
SUBJECT
Pedagogy
(Specialism*)
Education

EDS
3112
EDS
4200
EDS
4201-13
4265
Module
Code and Level
EDS
3111
EDS
3112
EDS
4200
EDS
4201-13
4265
Module
Code
and
Level
EDS
3111
EDS
3112
EDS
4200
EDS
4201-13
4265

ü ü ü

ü

ü ü B1

ü

B4

B5

B6

C2

C3

B8

B9

ü ü ü

C7

C8

C9

ü

ü

ü ü C1

B7

ü ü B3

ü

ü

ü

B2

ü

C4

ü

C5

C6

ü

ü ü ü ü ü

ü

ü

6. Module Narratives
In this section you will find details of all the modules associated with your programme so that you can see what is involved in your programme and make any choices over option modules
(if applicable).
The narratives are correct at the time of this handbook went to print, but details change over time (especially reading lists) and therefore you should always refer to the latest version available on the My Study area of myUniHub: https://myunihub.mdx.ac.uk/web/home-community/mystudy School Experience1 EDS3111
1.
Short code
2.
Title
3.
Level
4.
Credit points
5.
Start term

EDS 3111
School Experience1
PG 6
20
Sept 2015

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 58

6.
7.
8.
9.

10.
11.

12.

13.

14.

Subject
Secondary Education
Module Leader
Eddie Ellis
Accredited by
Module restrictions
(a) Pre-requisite
(b) Programme restriction
(c) Level restrictions
(d) Other restrictions or requirements
Automatic deferral
None
Aims
The module aims to introduce students to the professional secondary school environment. It aims to enable students to develop and demonstrate their progress in the understanding and skills necessary to operate as an effective teacher in a
Secondary School. As such it supports students in progress towards the achievement of current requirements for the award of Qualified teacher status.
Learning outcomes
On completion of this module, the successful student will be able to;
1. Know the requirements of the current regulations for the award of QTS
2. Understand the key policies and practices relating to working within the selected secondary school environment, linking these to the theoretical perspectives presented at university.
3. Develop knowledge of the National Curriculum and current educational policy/guidance. 4. Reflect critically on classroom observations to inform subsequent learning and teaching
5. Reflect critically on their planning and teaching and identify action to improve practice 6. Develop effective practice in planning for, teaching and assessing children across the 11-16, 11-18 or 14-19 age range as appropriate
7. Develop confidence and competence in the management of the children’s learning, based on knowledge and understanding of the children’s motivation, needs, abilities and aptitude
Syllabus
The module is taught in the secondary school setting (Placement 1) working towards the achievements of the statutory Standards required for QTS. It is expected that students will utilise elements from the Subject Studies 1 module to inform their practice in this module.
The placement is an introduction to the secondary school environment. A variety of focused activities ensure students make progress towards the requirements for the award of QTS. These include;
1. Structured lesson observations across subjects
2. Designing lesson plans and resources based on knowledge of the pupils and school curriculum.
3. Attending and participating in school training and staff meetings.
4. Teaching effective secondary school level lessons
Learning, teaching and assessment strategy
Whilst on placement students are given a school based mentor to support them and develop their practice. The mentor will meet with the students at least once a week to review progress and set developmental targets. Mentors will support students in their planning and delivery of lessons.
Lesson observations structured to give feedback using the Teachers Standards

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 59

ensure students learn how to plan and teach effectively. Verbal feedback and discussion following a lesson is a valuable teaching element during placement.
Mentors, experienced teachers within the school and university based staff take part in this process.
Professional Studies sessions are held in school using a variety of strategies including, small lectures, workshops seminars and tutorials.
Students take part in school based training programmes and staff meetings.
Assessment Strategies
Students are formatively assessed through lesson observations and weekly meetings. These have records of progress.
Students are assessed formatively and summatively (review point 1) on all learning objectives using the Assessment of Teaching Standards form (ATS). This requires students to document the evidence they have for meeting the QTS Standards and self assess their progress towards achievement of the QTS Standards.
The evidence atATS review point 1 will demonstrate that they are making adequate progress towards the QTS standards. This will show that they have the potential to qualify in the duration of the course.
School based mentors are required to use the clearly stated success criteria to make judgements on progress towards the standards required for QTS. University
Programme Leaders will moderate these judgements via Link Tutor and Course
Tutor visits and consultation with school based Coordinating Mentors. The module is pass/fail. 15.

16.
17.
18.

Assessment weighting
Seen examination x Unseen examination x Coursework (no examination)
100 %
Timetabled examination required
NO
Length of exam x Learning materials
Essential
• School Experience Handbook with appendices documents
• Programme Handbook
• Subject Module Handbook
• TA Requirements for statutory Standards required for QTS
• Assessment of Teaching Standards Form
Recommended
Reading and websites given in Module Narratives for Subject Pedagogy (EDS4200) and subject module (from EDS4201- 4213).

19.

Module run (NB. These should be set up 4 years in advance): Academic Term
Part
Start
End date year of date term
2013.14
September
October January
2013
2014
2014.15
September
October January
2014
2015

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Max student numbers
200

Campus/mode
e.g. DE

200

Page 60

2015.16
2016.17
20.

September
September

October
2015
October
2016

January
2016
January
2017

Timetabling information
(a) Please indicate which teaching activities will be offered in this module:
LECTURE (LEC)
SEMINAR (SEM)
LABORATORY(LAB)
WORKSHOP (WRK)
(b) Timetabled
(c ) Student centrally allocated

200
200
Placement in secondary school School Experience2 EDS3112
1.
Short code
EDS 3112
2.
Title
School Experience2
3.
Level
PG 6
4.
Credit points
40
5.
Start term
January 2016
6.
Subject
Secondary Education
7.
Module Leader
Eddie Ellis
8.
Accredited by
9.
Module restrictions
(a) Pre-requisite
Module EDS 3111 School Experience 1
(b) Programme restriction
(c) Level restrictions
(d) Other restrictions or requirements
10. Automatic deferral
None
11. Aims
The module aims to consolidate students professional practice in a second secondary school environment. It aims to ensure students are able to demonstrate their understanding and skills necessary to operate as an effective teacher in a
Secondary School. As such it supports students in the achievement of statutory requirements for the award of Qualified teacher status. To pass this module students must meet all the requirements for the award of QTS
12.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this module, the successful student will be able to;
1.
Demonstrate the knowledge, Understanding and skills as well as the professional requirements to meet the Teachers’ Standards for the award of
QTS.
2. Demonstrate a secure knowledge of the National Curriculum and current developments in educational policy and guidance as well as relevant exam syllabuses in the specialism
3. Critically evaluate the key policies and practices relating to working within the secondary school environment, linking these to the theoretical perspectives presented at university, current education policy and alternative school settings. 4. Reflect critically on classroom observations and their own teaching to inform subsequent learning and teaching
5. Plan, teach and assess children consistently and effectively across the ability and relevant age range they are trained to teach.
6. Demonstrate confidence and competence in the management of the
PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 61

13.

14.

children’s learning, meeting the needs of individual pupils of all abilities and backgrounds. 7. Work constructively and collaboratively with the variety of professional colleagues, parents and carers
8. Contribute to the wider life of the school they are placed in.
Syllabus
The module is taught in a second secondary school setting (Placement 2) ensuring the attainment of the Standards required for QTS. It is expected that students will utilise elements from the Subject Studies 1 and 2 modules as well as School
Experience 1 to inform their practice in this module.
The placement consolidates learning objectives from placement 1 as well as ensuring a reflective approach to their own professional practice. A variety of focused activities ensure students achieve the requirements for the award of QTS.
These include;
5. Structured observations and reflection on lessons across subjects
6. Designing and assessing effective Schemes of work and resources based on detailed knowledge of the pupils, ensuring and measuring their progression.
7. Attending and participating in school training and staff meetings.
8. Teaching consistent effective secondary school level lessons to a variety of classes. Learning, teaching and assessment strategy
Whilst on placement students are given a school based mentor to support them and develop their practice. The mentor will meet with the students at least once a week to review progress and set developmental targets. Mentors will support students in their planning and delivery of lessons.
Lesson observations structured to give feedback using the Teachers Standards ensure students plan and teach effectively. Verbal feedback and discussion following a lesson is a valuable teaching element during placement. Mentors, experienced teachers within the school and university based staff take part in this process.
Students take part in school based training programmes and staff meetings.
Assessment Strategies
Students are formatively assessed through lesson observations and weekly meetings. These have formal records of progress. A detailed school experience file documenting students school based work is available for scrutiny by the school based mentor, coordinating mentor and university course tutor.
Students are assessed formatively (review points 2,3) and summatively(ATS Final) on all learning objectives using the Assessment of Teaching Standards form (ATS).
This requires students to document the evidence they have for meeting the QTS
Standards and self assess their attainment.School-based mentors are then required to use the clearly stated success criteria to make judgements for each of the standards required for QTS. University Programme Leaders will moderate these judgements via Link Tutor and Course Tutor visits and consultation with school based Coordinating Mentors. This module is pass/fail.

15.

16.
17.

Assessment weighting
Seen examination
Unseen examination
Coursework (no examination)
Timetabled examination required
Length of exam

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

x x 100 %
NO
x

Page 62

18.

Learning materials
- Essential
• School Experience Handbook with appendices documents
• Programme Handbook
• Subject Module Handbook
• TA Requirements for statutory Standards required for QTS
• Assessment of Teaching Standards Form
- Recommended
Reading and websites given in Module Narratives for Teaching Pedagogy
(EDS4200) and subject module (1 from EDS4201- 4213).

19.

20.

Module run (NB. These should be set up 4 years in advance): Academic Term
Part
Start
End date year of date term
2013.14
January
February June
2014
2014
2014.15
January
February June
2015
2015
2015.16
January
February June
2016
2016
2016.17
January
February June
2017
2017
Timetabling information
(a) Please indicate which teaching activities will be offered in this module:
LECTURE (LEC)
SEMINAR (SEM)
LABORATORY(LAB)
WORKSHOP (WRK)
(b) Timetabled
(c ) Student centrally allocated

Max student numbers
200

Campus/mode e.g.
DE

200
200
200
Placement in secondary school Subject Pedagogy EDS4200
1.
Short code
EDS4200
2.
Title
Subject Pedagogy
3.
Level
7
4.
Credit points
40
5.
Start term
Sept 2013
6.
Subject
Secondary Education
7.
Module Leader
Gareth Evers
8.
Accredited by
9.
Module restrictions
(a) Pre-requisite
(b) Programme restriction
(c) Level restrictions
(d) Other restrictions or requirements
10. Automatic deferral
None
11. Aims
The module aims to enable students to develop the understanding and skills necessary to operate as a critically reflective Teacher in a Secondary School. As

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 63

such it supports students in the achievement of current requirements for the award of
Qualified teacher status.
12.

Learning outcomes
1. On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to
Develop a critical and evaluative perspective on current debates in Secondary
Education and in their subject specialism particularly in relation to the requirements of curriculum models used in school including the National Curriculum.
2. Develop an understanding of the classroom and school setting in a diverse society and how schools and their own teaching practice can promote social inclusion.
3.Critically reflect on and evaluate their own teaching in the light of current theoretical developments in Secondary Education as a whole and in their subject specialism in particular 4. Analyse research data and critically evaluate how research has contributed to the knowledge and understanding of how to teach effectively
5. Develop an reasoned argument and challenge assumptions
6. Develop a creative and constructively critical approach towards innovation
7. Acquire the skills and processes necessary to undertake a small scale piece of educational research

13.

Syllabus
The module is taught in two inter-locking strands each with its own syllabus,
Professional studies and pathway specialism
Professional Studies:
Coaching
Behaviour Management and Motivational strategies
Teaching for effective learning
Teaching and Learning Styles
Safeguarding
Inclusion, SEND, EAL, differentiation
Monitoring and assessment of pupils learning
ICT across the curriculum
Professional responsibilities of teachers including membership of Trades
Unions
Obtaining first teaching posts
Pathway Specialism:
Curriculum models used in schools
TheNational Curriculum
Planning Lessons and Schemes of Work
Teaching and learning in the community of the school and beyond
Active Learning
GCSE Short Course, Full Course and A level
Developing Subject Knowledge in their subject specialism
Working with agencies and organisations to enrich and enhance Secondary
School education and their subject specialism in particular
Developing and evaluating resources

14.

Learning, teaching and assessment strategy
The professional studies component is taught through a mixture of lecture, seminar and resource based learning. Students work in cross curricular groups and are introduced to the weeks theme in a lecture. This is followed up by seminar discussion, resource based activity and school based research work.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 64

The pedagogy component is delivered through workshops: some will be generic, cross-curricular or with a closely related subject and others will be subject specialism focused. These model good practice in Secondary Education and are sometimes lead by the tutors and sometimes by students. They include presentations, resource development, discussion, communities of enquiry, classroom activities, games etc.
Visits and Fieldwork are also undertaken as appropriate.
There are also regular tutorials for students to discuss their progress and school based work.
The module is e-enhanced and supported through through the VLE (Moodle)
The Moodle area is listed on Unihubunder MyLearning. And contains a Subject
Pedagogy module. Within this area students engage with discussion groups, complete online quizzes, watch video material, download resources, upload material to share with others and complete assignments. All of these developments support the aim of developing a reflective practitioner.
Assessment Strategies
Students are formatively assessed through micro-teaching, presentations and ongoing tutorials.
Students are summatively assessed through two written assignments. Both need to be passed to pass the module. Marking is not aggregated as the module and its components are assessed on a pass/fail basis.
Assignment 1 (Why Teach the subject specialism?) is a 2000 word essay that enables students to reflect on the philosophical, historical and social and political and educational justifications for the inclusion of their subject in the Secondary
Curriculum. It particularly assesses LOs 1-3.
Formative feedback is provided by a bullet pointed essay plan and a bibliography marked during induction
Assignment 2 is 4000 words long. Here they undertake a small scale research assignment that compares theoretical perspectives in education with the reality they find in school. The focus of this is determined by National Priorities. The discussion of current research and practical research and reflection assess LOs 4-7
Formative feedback is given through discussion of a research proposal and peer assessment of a nearly complete draft.
In terms of essay writing and style students receive a marked copy of their ‘Why
Teach’ essay back before they write their assignment.
15.

Assessment weighting

16.
17.
18.

Seen examination
Unseen examination
Coursework (no examination)
Timetabled examination required
Length of exam
Learning materials

33% Assignment 1
66% Assignment 2
0%
0%
100 %
NO
n/a

There follows a sample reading list. All up to date reading lists are available at

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 65

http://readinglists.mdx.ac.uk
Essential
Capel, S, Leask, M & Turner, T (1995) Learning to Teach in The Secondary School.
(5th edition, 2009), London: Routledge
Freire, P. (1996). Pedagogy of the oppressed.Harmondsworth Penguin.
Gardener, J.(2012) Assessment and Learning London, Sage
Pask, R., and Joy, B, (20070 A Handbook for Education Professionals OU Press,
Rodgers, B. (2011) Classroom Behaviour: A practical guide to effective teaching 3rd
Edition. London, Sage
Spooner, W.(2011) The SEN Handbook for trainee Teachers, NQTs and Teaching
Assistants, London, David Fulton, 2011
Wilson, E. (2008) School-based Research: A Guide for Education Students.
London, Sage. http://www.naldic.org.uk/ 19.

20.

Recommended
Bell, J. (1999). Doing your Research Project (3rd edition) Milton Keynes, OU Press.
Bruner, J. S. (1974). Toward a theory of instruction. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press.
Cohen, L. Manion, L. and Morrison, K. (2011) ‘Research Methods in
Education’London and New York, Routledge/Falmer.
Gillespie, H.Boulton, H.Hramiak, A.and Williamson, R. (2007)Learning and Teaching with Virtual Learning and Environments, London,Learning Matters/Sage
Honey, P. and Mumford A. (1986). A Manual of Learning Styles, Peter Honey,
Maidenhead
Kolb. D. A. and Fry, R. (1975) Toward an applied theory of experiential learning. in C.
Cooper (ed.) Theories of Group Process, London: John Wiley.
William, D, Black, P. 1998 Inside the Black Box : Raising standards through
Classroom Assessment London, Kings College
Module run (NB. These should be set up 4 years in advance):
Academic Term
Part of
Start End Max
Campus/mode e.g. DE year term date date student numbers 2013-14
Autumn
HE
2014-15
Autumn
HE
2015-16
Autumn
HE
2016-17
Autumn
HE
Timetabling information
(a) Please indicate which teaching activities will be offered in this module:
LECTURE (LEC)
YES
SEMINAR (SEM)
YES
LABORATORY(LAB)
YES
WORKSHOP (WRK)
YES
(b) Timetabled
(c ) Student centrally allocated

Business Education EDS4201
1.
Short code
2.
Title
3.
Level
4.
Credit points
5.
Start term

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

EDS 4201
Business Education
7
20
Jan 2016

Page 66

6.
7.
8.
9.

10.
11.

Subject
Module Leader
Accredited by
Module restrictions
(a) Pre-requisite
(b) Programme restriction

Secondary Education
Lech Wersocki

EDS 3111
Secondary Initial Teacher
Education

(c) Level restrictions
(d) Other restrictions or requirements
Automatic deferral[150 characters]
None
Aims
The module builds on the learning and skills developed in EDS4200 Subject
Pedagogyand EDS3111School experience 1 to enable students to deepen their understanding and skills necessary to operate as a critically reflective Business
Teacher in a Secondary School. As such it supports students in the achievement of current requirements for the award of Qualified teacher status by responding flexibly to their identified needs.

12.

Learning outcomes
On successful completion this module, the student will be able to
1. Develop critical and evaluative perspectives on current debates in Secondary
Education in particular Business subjects using theoretical understandings and practical experience of teaching Business, Economics and Enterprise (BEE) in school 2. Develop strategies for enhancing broader BEE understanding in the wider school
3. Critically reflect and evaluate their own practice of the teaching of BEE in the light of current theoretical developments and school practice and research
4. To plan, teach, resource and evaluate effective BEE schemes of work and lessons for pupils for the age of 14 to 19
5. To develop effective assessment strategies to monitor and enhance pupil progress formatively and summatively including the critical analysis of pupil data

13.

Syllabus
This module is designed to support the professional development of trainees and to enable them to achieve good or outstanding outcomes. The syllabus is therefore flexible and arises from an analysis of the collective outcomes for the cohort from
SE1 and the first part of SE 2 as recorded on the Assessment of Teaching Standards form. Areas covered will include
Planning Business Lessons and Schemes of Work
Developing and evaluating BEE resources
Differentiation and developing targeted questioning
Developing resources for BEE as a whole school theme
Developing active learning in BEE including the effective use of ICT
Developing skills and understanding across the range of vocational and academic business courses
Deepening and broadening as required BEE subject knowledge
Developing further the pedagogy that underpins the best practice in teaching BEE

14.

Learning, teaching and assessment strategy
This module is delivered mainly through workshops. These model good practice in
Business Education and are sometimes lead by the tutor and sometimes by students. They include presentations, resource development, discussion,

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 67

communities of enquiry, classroom activities, games etc. When relevant specific visits to schools can be arranged
Student outcomes from SE 1 and the first stage of SE 2 are analysed to ensure that support is given to strengthen areas for development and consolidate and share good and outstanding practice
There are also tutorials for students to discuss their progress and school based work and targets are regularly set and reviewed
The module is supported through the VLE (Moodle)The Moodle area is listed on
Unihub under MyLearning. Moodle features a Business Studies Education Module.
Within this area students engage with discussion groups, complete online quizzes, watch video material, download resources, upload material to share with others and complete assignments. All of these developments support the aim of developing a reflective practitioner.
Assessment Strategies
Students are formatively assessed through micro-teaching, sharing good practice from schools and on-going tutorials.
Students are summatively assessed on all LOs
Through a Monitoring and Assessment assignment. Here they design, resource, teach and evaluate a scheme of work that reflects best practice in BEE and
Assessment. Pupil progress is monitored and base line data used to establish progress. The scheme of work is evaluated in the light of an analysis of pupils’ progress and improvements recommended.
The assignment consists of a theoretical justification and evaluation for the scheme of work that they produce along with a detailed analysis of pupils progress. This consists of 3000 words.
The scheme of work, resources, lesson plans and samples of pupils work provide the evidence on which the analysis is based.
Students receive formative feedback on a proposal and a draft of the theoretical justification. 15.

16.
17.
18.

Assessment weighting
Seen examination
0%
Unseen examination
0%
Coursework (no examination)
100 %
Timetabled examination required
NO
Length of exam n/a Learning materials
There follows a sample reading list. All up to date reading lists are available at http://readinglists.mdx.ac.uk Essential
Brant, J and Davies, P. (2006) Business, Economics and Enterprise: Teaching
School Subjects 11 to 19London, RoutledgeFalmer
Jephcote and Abbott. (2005) Teaching Business Education 14-19London, David
Fulton Publishing.
Ofsted. (2003) Good Assessment in Secondary Schools. HMI

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 68

Woollard, J (2007) Learning and Teaching Using ICT in Secondary Schools
(Achieving QTS) Exeter, UK: Learning Matters
Recommended

Anderton A (2008) A level Economics; Causeway Press
Ginnis, P (2005) The Teacher’s Toolkit. Crownhouse Publishing
Marcuse et al (2011) Business Studies for A Level, Hodder Education
Wilson, E. (2008) School-based Research:A Guide for Education Students.
London, Sage.
Websites

www.ebea.org.uk www.bized.co.uk 19.

20.

Module run (NB. These should be set up 4 years in advance):
Academic Term
Part
Start End year of date date term 2013-14
Spring/Summer
2014-15
Spring/Summer
2015-16
Spring/Summer
2016-17
Spring/Summer
Timetabling information
(a) Please indicate which teaching activities will be offered in this module:
LECTURE (LEC)
SEMINAR (SEM)
LABORATORY(LAB)
WORKSHOP (WRK)
(b) Timetabled
(c )Student centrally allocated

Citizenship Education EDS4202
1.
Short code
2.
Title
3.
Level
4.
Credit points
5.
Start term
6.
Subject
7.
8.
9.

10.
11.

Module Leader
Accredited by
Module restrictions
(a) Pre-requisite
(b) Programme restriction

Max student numbers

Campus/mode e.g.
DE

YES
YES
NO
NO
YES/NO
YES/NO
EDS4202
Citizenship Education
7
20
Jan 2016
Secondary Initial Teacher
Education
Gavin Baldwin

EDS3111
Secondary Initial Teacher
Education

(c) Level restrictions
(d) Other restrictions or requirements
Automatic deferral
None
Aims
The module builds on the learning and skills developed in EDS4200 Subject
Pedagogy and EDS3111 School Experience 1 to enable students to deepen their

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 69

understanding and skills necessary to operate as a critically reflective Citizenship
Teacher in a Secondary School. As such it supports students in the achievement of current requirements for the award of Qualified teacher status by responding flexibly to their identified needs.
12.

Learning outcomes
On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to
1. develop critical and evaluative perspectives on current debates in Secondary
Citizenship educationusing theoretical understandings and practical experience of teaching Citizenship in school
2. develop strategies for enhancing Citizenship Education and democratic participation within and beyond the school setting emphasising Active Citizenship pedagogy 3. critically reflect on and evaluate their own practice of the teaching of Citizenship in the light of current theoretical developments
4. plan, teach, resource, evaluate and further develop effective Citizenship schemes of work and lessons for pupils for the age of 11 to 16
5. develop effective assessment strategies to monitor and enhance pupil progress formatively and summatively including the critical analysis of pupil data

13.

Syllabus
This module is designed to support the professional development of trainees and to enable them to achieve good or outstanding outcomes. The syllabus is therefore flexible and arises from an analysis of the collective outcomes for the cohort from
SE1 and the first part of SE 2 as recorded on the Assessment of Teaching Standards form. Areas covered will include

14.

Assessing Citizenship
Planning Citizenship Lessons and Schemes of Work
Differentiation and developing targeted questioning
Working with other adults in a Citizenship context
Teaching Citizenship across the curriculum (History, RE, Art etc)
Development and support of Active Citizenship projects: increasing learner autonomy
Working with Museums and Galleries to enhance Citizenship education
Developing and evaluating Citizenship resources
Developing further the pedagogy that underpins best practice in teaching Citizenship
Learning, teaching and assessment strategy
This module is delivered mainly through workshops. These model good practice in
Citizenship Education and are sometimes lead by tutors and sometimes by students.
They include presentations, resource development, discussion, communities of enquiry, classroom activities, games etc. Visits are undertaken to schools, museums etc and visiting speakers from NGOs and partnership schools contribute to the programme. Student outcomes from SE 1 and the first stage of SE 2 are analysed to ensure that support is given to strengthen areas for development and consolidate and share good and outstanding practice
There are also regular tutorials for students to discuss their progress and school based work and targets are regularly set and reviewed
The module is supported through the VLE (Moodle) The module is supported through the VLE (Moodle)The Moodle area is listed on Unihub under MyLearning. Moodle

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 70

features a Citizenship Education module. Within this area students engage with discussion groups, complete online quizzes, watch video material, download resources, upload material to share with others and complete assignments. All of these developments support the aim of developing a reflective practitioner.
Assessment Strategies
Students are formatively assessed through micro-teaching, sharing good practice from schools and on-going tutorials.
Students are summatively assessed on all LOs through a Monitoring and
Assessment assignment. Here they design, resource, teach and evaluate a scheme of work that reflects best practice in Citizenship Education and Assessment. Pupil progress is monitored and base line data used to establish progress. The scheme of work is evaluated in the light of an analysis of pupils’ progress and improvements recommended. The assignment consists of a theoretical justification and evaluation for the scheme of work that they produce along with a detailed analysis of pupils progress. This consists of 3000 words.
The scheme of work, resources, lesson plans and samples of pupils work provide the evidence on which the analysis is based.
Students receive formative feedback on a proposal and a draft of the theoretical justification. 15.

16.
17.
18.

Assessment weighting
Seen examination
Unseen examination
Coursework (no examination)
Timetabled examination required
Length of exam
Learning materials

0%
0%
100 %
NO
n/a

There follows a sample reading list. All up to date reading lists are available at http://readinglists.mdx.ac.uk Essential
Brown, K and Fairbrass, S The Citizenship Teacher's Handbook (2010) London
Continuum
Bellamy, D. 2008 Citizenship, A Very Short Introduction Oxford Oxford
University Press
Crick, B. (1998) Education for Citizenship and the teaching of Democracy in schools, London QCA
Recommended Reading
Huddleston, T and Kerr, D. (eds) (2006) Making Sense of Citizenship,
London Hodder Murray
Jerome, L (2012) England’s Citizenship Education Experiment, London, Bloomsbury
Ofsted Citizenship Established? (2010) www.ofsted.gov.uk/publications/090159 Osler, A. and Starkey, H. (2005) Changing Citizenship: democracy and inclusion in education) Maidenhead, Open University Press

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 71

Web Sites
Association for Citizenship Teaching www.teachingcitizenship.org.uk
Citizenship Foundation www.citizenshipfoundation.org.uk
Amnesty International www.amnesty.org.uk
Oxfam www.oxfam.org.uk
Save the children www.savethechildren.org.uk
Human Rights Watch www.hrw.org
Parliamentary Education www.parliament.uk/education
19.

20.

Module run (NB. These should be set up 4 years in advance):
Academic Term
Part
Start End year of date date term 2013-14
Spring/Summer
2014-15
Spring/Summer
2015-16
Spring/Summer
2016-17
Spring/Summer
Timetabling information
(a) Please indicate which teaching activities will be offered in this module:
LECTURE (LEC)
SEMINAR (SEM)
LABORATORY(LAB)
WORKSHOP (WRK)
(b) Timetabled
(c ) Student centrally allocated

Computer Science with ICT EDS4203
1.
Short code
2.
Title
3.
Level
4.
Credit points
5.
Start term
6.
Subject
7.
Module Leader
8.
Accredited by
9.
Module restrictions
(a) Pre-requisite
(b) Programme restriction

10.
11.

12.

Max student numbers

Campus/mode e.g.
DE

YES
YES
NO
NO
YES/NO
YES/NO
EDS4203
Computer Science with ICT
7
20
Jan 2016
Secondary Education
Catherine Walsh

EDS3111
Secondary Initial Teacher
Education

(c) Level restrictions
(d) Other restrictions or requirements
Automatic deferral
None
Aims
The module builds on the learning and skills developed in EDS4200 Subject
Pedagogy and EDS3111 School experience 1 to enable students to deepen their understanding and skills necessary to operate as a critically reflective Computer
Science with ICT Teacher in a Secondary School. As such it supports students in the achievement of current requirements for the award of Qualified teacher status by responding flexibly to their identified needs.
Learning outcomes

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 72

On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to
On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to
1. develop critical and evaluative perspectives on current debates in Secondary
Computer Science Educationusing theoretical understandings and practical experience of teaching Computer Science with ICT in school.
2. develop strategies for enhancing Computer Science with ICT within and beyond the school setting
3. critically reflect on and evaluate their own practice of the teaching of CSICT in the light of current theoretical developments
4. plan, teach, resource, evaluate and further develop effective CSICT schemes of work and lessons for pupils for the age of 11 to 16
5. develop effective assessment strategies to monitor and enhance pupil progress formatively and summativelyincluding the critical analysis of pupil data
13.

Syllabus
This module is designed to support the professional development of trainees and to enable them to achieve good or outstanding outcomes. The syllabus is therefore flexible and arises from an analysis of the collective outcomes for the cohort from
SE1 and the first part of SE 2 as recorded on the Assessment of Teaching Standards form. Areas covered will include
National Curriculum CSICT
Planning Computer Science with CSICT Lessons and Schemes of Work
Computer Science with ICT in the community of the school and beyond
GCSE Short Course, Full Course Vocational Course (DIDA, BTEC & Cambridge
Nationals) and A level
Developing and broadening CSICT Subject Knowledge
Computer Science with Language : Machines and Computation, Data and
Representation, Communication and Co-ordination, Abstraction and Design, Wider
Context of Computing Working with Professional Organisations (CAS, ITTE)
Developing and evaluating Computer Science with ICT resources
Developing further the pedagogy that underpins the best practice in teaching CSICT

14.

Learning, teaching and assessment strategy
This module is delivered maily through workshops. These model good practice in
Computer Science with ICT and are sometimes lead by tutors and sometimes by students. They include presentations, resource development, discussion, communities of enquiry, classroom activities, games etc. Visits are undertaken to schools, exhibitions etc and visiting speakers from Edexcel and partnership schools contribute to the programme.
Student outcomes from SE 1 and the first stage of SE 2 are analysed to ensure that support is given to strengthen areas for development and consolidate and share good and outstanding practice
There are also regular tutorials for students to discuss their progress and school based work and targets are regularly set and reviewed
The module is supported through the VLE (Moodle) The module is supported through the VLE (Moodle)The Moodle area is listed on Unihub under MyLearning. Moodle

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 73

features a Computer Science with ICT Education Module. Within this area students engage with discussion groups, complete online quizzes, watch video material, download resources, upload material to share with others and complete assignments. All of these developments support the aim of developing a reflective practitioner. Assessment Strategies
Students are formatively assessed through micro-teaching, sharing good practice from schools and on-going tutorials.
Students are summatively assessed on all LOs
Through a Monitoring and Assessment assignment. Here they design, resource, teach and evaluate a scheme of work that reflects best practice in Computer Science with ICT and Assessment. Pupil progress is monitored and base line data used to establish progress. The scheme of work is evaluated in the light of an analysis of pupils’ progress and improvements recommended.
The assignment consists of a theoretical justification and evaluation for the scheme of work that they produce along with a detailed analysis of pupils progress. This consists of 3000 words.
The scheme of work, resources, lesson plans and samples of pupils work provide the evidence on which the analysis is based.
Students receive formative feedback on a proposal and a draft of the theoretical justification. 15.

16.
17.
18.

Assessment weighting
Seen examination
Unseen examination
Coursework (no examination)
Timetabled examination required
Length of exam
Learning materials

0%
0%
100 %
NO
n/a

There follows a sample reading list. All up to date reading lists are available at http://readinglists.mdx.ac.uk Essential
Russell, T (2001) Teaching and Using ICT in Secondary SchoolsLondon, David
Fulton Publishers
Simmons, C, Hawkins, C, (2009) Teaching ICT, London, Sage
Woollard, J (2007) Learning and Teaching Using ICT in Secondary Schools
(Achieving QTS) Exeter, UK: Learning Matters
Recommended
Cole, G. 101 Essential Lists for Using ICT in the Classroom, Continuum
Crawford, R (1997) Managing Information Technology in Secondary Schools,
London, Routledge.
Furlonger, C and Haywood, S (2004) Teaching the National ICT Strategy at Key
Stage 3- A Practical Guide, David Fulton Publishers
ICT for AS and ICT for A2,.London, Hodder& Stoughton (2008/9).
Kennewell, S, Parkinson, J and Tanner, H (2005) Learning to Teach ICT in the
Secondary School,London, Routledge

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 74

Leask, M, Pachler, N, (2005) Learning to teach using ICT in the Secondary School,
London, Routledge
McFarlane, A (Ed) (1997) Information Technology and Authentic Learning,London,
Routledge.
Mott,J. and Rendell,I. (2008) Spreadsheet Projects in Excel for Advanced Level (3rd
Edition). London, Hodder& Stoughton.
Mott,J. and Rendell,I.(2003) Database Projects in Access for Advanced Level by
Julian Mott and Ian Rendell (2nd Edition).London, Hodder& Stoughton
Website
The Association for Information Technology in Teacher Education www.itte.org.uk/ 19.

20.

Module run (NB. These should be set up 4 years in advance):
Academic Term
Part
Start End year of date date term 2013-14
Spring/Summer
2014-15
Spring/Summer
2015-16
Spring/Summer
2016-17
Spring/Summer
Timetabling information
(a) Please indicate which teaching activities will be offered in this module:
LECTURE (LEC)
SEMINAR (SEM)
LABORATORY(LAB)
WORKSHOP (WRK)
(b) Timetabled
(c ) Student centrally allocated

Drama with English EDS4265
1.
Short code
2.
Title
3.
4.
5.
6.

Level
Credit points
Start term
Subject

7.
8.
9.

Module Leader
Accredited by
Module restrictions
(a) Pre-requisite
(b) Programme restriction

10.
11.

Max student numbers

Campus/mode e.g.
DE

YES
YES
NO
NO
YES/NO
YES/NO

EDS4265
Drama with English
Education
7
20
Jan 2016
Secondary Initial Teacher
Education
Alex Suthern

EDS3111
Secondary Teacher
Education

(c) Level restrictions
(d) Other restrictions or requirements
Automatic deferral
None
Aims
The module builds on the learning and skills developed in EDS 4200 Subject
Pedagogy and EDS3111 School Experience 1 to enable students to deepen

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 75

their understanding and skills necessary to operate as a critically reflective
Drama with English Teacher in a Secondary School. As such it supports students in the achievement of current requirements for the award of Qualified
Teacher Status by responding flexibly to their identified needs.
12.

Learning outcomes
On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to
1. Develop critical and evaluative perspectives on current debates in Drama
Education and Secondary English education using theoretical understandings and practical experience of teaching Drama and English in school 2. Develop strategies for enhancing Drama and English Education within and beyond the school setting using current pedagogies
3. Critically reflect and evaluate their own practice of the teaching of Drama and English in the light of current theoretical developments
4. Plan, teach, evaluate, resource and further develop effective Drama and
English schemes of work and lessons for pupils for the age of 11 to 18
5. Develop effective assessment strategies to monitor and enhance pupil progress formatively and summatively including the critical analysis of pupil data. 13.

Syllabus
This module is designed to support the professional development of trainees and to enable them to achieve good or outstanding outcomes. The syllabus is therefore flexible and arises from an analysis of the collective outcomes for the cohort from SE1 and the first part of SE 2 as recorded on the Assessment of
Teaching Standards form.
Areas covered will include
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

14.

Assessing Drama and English
Planning innovative Drama and English Lessons and Schemes of Work
Planning differentiation and developing targeted questioning
Working with other adults in a Drama and/or English Education context
Teaching Drama and English across the curriculum (History, RE, English etc) 6. Development and support of Active Drama projects: increasing learner autonomy 7. Working with Museums and Galleries to enhance Drama Education
8. Developing and evaluating resources for the Drama classroom
9. Developing further the pedagogy that underpins the best practice in teaching Drama and English.
Learning, teaching and assessment strategy
This module is mainly delivered through workshops. These model good practice in Drama and English Education and are sometimes lead by tutors, and teachers from partnership schools, and sometimes by students. They include presentations, resource development, discussion, communities of enquiry, classroom activities, games etc. Visits are undertaken to schools, museums etc. and visiting speakers from NGOs and partnership schools contribute to the programme. Student outcomes from SE 1 and the first stage of SE 2 are analysed to ensure

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 76

that support is given to strengthen areas for development and consolidate and share good and outstanding practice
There are also regular tutorials for students to discuss their progress and school based work and targets are regularly set and reviewed
The module is supported through the VLE (Unihub) and under My Learning.
Within this area students engage with discussion groups, complete online quizzes, watch video material, download resources, upload material to share with others and complete assignments. All of these developments support the aim of developing a reflective practitioner.
Assessment Strategies
Students are formatively assessed through micro-teaching, sharing good practice from schools and on-going tutorials.
Students are summatively assessed on all LOs
Through a Monitoring and Assessment assignment. Here they design, resource, teach and evaluate a scheme of work that reflects best practice in
Drama and/or English Education and Assessment. Pupil progress is monitored and base line data used to establish progress. The scheme of work is evaluated in the light of an analysis of pupils’ progress and improvements recommended.
The assignment consists of a theoretical justification and evaluation for the scheme of work that they produce along with a detailed analysis of pupil progress. This consists of 3000 words.
The scheme of work, resources, lesson plans and samples of pupils work provide the evidence on which the analysis is based.
Students receive formative feedback on a proposal and a draft of the theoretical justification. 15.

16.
17.
18.

Assessment weighting
Seen examination
Unseen examination
Coursework (no examination)
Timetabled examination required
Length of exam
Learning materials

0%
0%
100 %
NO
n/a

There follows a sample reading list. All up to date reading lists are available at http://readinglists.mdx.ac.uk e- textbook
Students will receive an e-textbook, not a print version.
David Davis (2014) Imagining the Real: Towards a new theory of Drama
Education. IOE.
Unlike the standard e-books which have copyright restrictions on how much may be printed, the e-core textbook may be printed off in full (students are entitled to free printing).

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 77

Essential
Ackroyd, J. (Ed.) (2006) Research Methodologies for Drama Education.
Birmingham: Trentham Books.
Kempe, A. & Nicholson, H. (2001) Learning to Teach Drama 11-18 (2nd edition
2007). London: Continuum.
Kempe, A. & Ashwell, M. (2000) Progression in Secondary Drama. London:
Heinemann Educational Books.
Leeder, J. (2001) Edexcel Drama for GCSE (2nd Edition 2009). London:
Hodder & Stoughton.
Taylor, P & Warner, C. (Ed.) (2006) Structure and Spontaneity: the process drama of Cecily O'Neill. Birmingham: Trentham Books.
Wright, T. (2012) How to Be A Brilliant English Teacher, London, Routledge
Recommended Reading
Hulson, M (2006) Schemes for Classroom Drama. Birmingham: Trentham
Books.
Graham, S. (2009) The Frantic Assembly Book of Devising Theatre. London:
Routledge
Taylor, P. & Warner, C.D. (2006) Structure and Spontaneity: the process drama of Cecily O’Neil. Birmingham: Trentham Books.
Web Sites
Drama_UK
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/drama_uk/
London Drama http://www.londondrama.org National Drama http://www.nationaldrama.co.uk/ NATD http://www.natd.eu NT Stagework http://www.stagework.org.uk/ NT Discover http://www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/discover-more Routledge Performance Practitioners series http://goo.gl/u9ZNR RSC Education http://www.rsc.org.uk/education/ Theatre & Performance Museum http://www.vam.ac.uk/page/t/theatre-and-performance/ NATE – National Association for the Teaching of English www.nate.org.uk English and Media Centre www.englishandmedia.co.uk 19.

20.

Module run (NB. These should be set up 4 years in advance):
Academic Term
Part
Start End year of date date term 2015-16
Spring/Summer
2017-18
Spring/Summer
2018 -19 Spring/Summer
2019- 20 Spring/Summer
Timetabling information

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Max student numbers

Campus/mode
e.g. DE

Page 78

(a) Please indicate which teaching activities will be offered in this module:
LECTURE (LEC)
SEMINAR (SEM)
LABORATORY(LAB)
WORKSHOP (WRK)
(b) Timetabled
(c ) Student centrally allocated
English Education EDS4205
1.
Short code
2.
Title
3.
Level
4.
Credit points
5.
Start term
6.
Subject
7.
8.
9.

10.
11.

12.

YES
YES
NO
NO
NO
NO

EDS 4205
English Education
7
20
Jan 2016
Secondary Initial Teacher
Education
Ross Cotter

Module Leader
Accredited by
Module restrictions [2000 characters]
(a) Pre-requisite
EDS 3111
(b) Programme restriction
Secondary Teacher Education
(c) Level restrictions
(d) Other restrictions or requirements
Automatic deferral [150 characters]
None
Aims
The module builds on the learning and skills developed in EDS4200 Subject
Pedagogy and EDS3111 School experience 1 to enable students to deepen their understanding and skills necessary to operate as a critically reflective English
Teacher in a Secondary School. As such it supports students in the achievement of current requirements for the award of Qualified Teacher Status by responding flexibly to their identified needs.
Learning outcomes
On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to:
Develop critical and evaluative perspectives on current debates in Secondary English educationusing theoretical understandings and practical experience of teaching
English in school.
Develop strategies for enhancing English Education and democratic participation within and beyond the school setting emphasising Active English pedagogy.
Critically reflect and evaluate their own practice of the teaching of English in the light of current theoretical developments.
Plan, teach, resource, evaluate, and further develop effective English schemes of work and lessons for pupils for the age of 11 to 18.
Develop effective assessment strategies to monitor and enhance pupil progress both formatively and summatively including the critical analysis of pupil data.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 79

13.

Syllabus
This module is designed to support the professional development of trainees and to enable them to achieve good or outstanding outcomes. The syllabus is therefore flexible and arises from an analysis of the collective outcomes for the cohort from
SE1 and the first part of SE 2 as recorded on the Assessment of Teaching Standards form. Areas covered will include:
Assessing English
Planning innovative and engaging English Lessons and Schemes of Work
Planning for personalisation and differentiation in the classroom.
Developing effective and targeted questioning
Working with other adults in a English context
Understanding and supporting literacy across the curriculum
Increasing learner autonomy and independent learning
Developing and evaluating English resources
9. Developing further the pedagogy that underpins the best practice in teaching English

14.

Learning, teaching and assessment strategy
This module is delivered mainly through workshops. These model good practice in
English Education and are lead by tutors, trainees, and teachers from partnership schools. They include presentations, resource development, discussion, communities of enquiry, classroom activities, games etc.
Student outcomes from SE 1 and the first stage of SE 2 are analysed to ensure that support is given to strengthen areas for development and consolidate and share good and outstanding practice
There are also regular tutorials for students to discuss their progress and school based work and targets are regularly set and reviewed
Students are formatively assessed through micro-teaching, sharing good practice from schools and on-going tutorials.
The module is supported through the VLE (Moodle) The module is supported through the VLE (Moodle)The Moodle area is listed on Unihub under MyLearning. Moodle features a English Education Module. Within this area students engage with discussion groups, complete online quizzes, watch video material, download resources, upload material to share with others and complete assignments. All of these developments support the aim of developing a reflective practitioner.
Students are summatively assessed on all LOs
Through a Monitoring and Assessment assignment. Here they design, resource, teach and evaluate a scheme of work that reflects best practice in English Education and Assessment. Pupil progress is monitored and base line data used to establish progress. The scheme of work is evaluated in the light of an analysis of pupils’ progress and improvements recommended.
The assignment consists of a theoretical justification and evaluation for the scheme of work that they produce along with a detailed analysis of pupils progress. This consists of 3000 words.
The scheme of work, resources, lesson plans and samples of pupils work provide the evidence on which the analysis is based.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 80

Students receive formative feedback on a proposal and a draft of the theoretical justification. 15.

16.
17.
18.

Assessment weighting
Seen examination
Unseen examination
Coursework (no examination)
Timetabled examination required
Length of exam
Learning materials

0%
0%
100 %
NO
n/a

There follows a sample reading list. All up to date reading lists are available at http://readinglists.mdx.ac.uk Essential
Capel S, Leask M and Turner T (2009) Learning To Teach In The Secondary School,
LondonRoutledge
Davison J. and Dowson J. (2009) Learning to Teach English in the Secondary
Pollard, A, (2008) Reflective Teaching, Continuum
Wright, T. (2012) How to Be A Brilliant English Teacher,London, Routledge
Wyse, D, Jones R, Bradford H, Wolpert, M, (2013) Teaching English, Language and
Literacy, Routledge
Recommended Reading
Beadle, P and Murphy, J (2013) Why Are You Shouting At Us? LondonBloomsbury
Brindley, S. (1994, revised 2005) Teaching English London, Routledge
Butt, G, (2008), Lesson Planning, Continuum
Web Sites
NATE – National Association for the Teaching of English www.nate.org.uk
English and Media Centre www.englishandmedia.co.uk
Teachit www.teachit.co.uk
TES www.tes.co.uk
Edusites http://edusites.co.uk
Universal Teacher http://www.universalteacher.org.uk
19.

20.

Module run (NB. These should be set up 4 years in advance):
Academic Term
Part
Start End year of date date term 2013-14
Spring/Summer
2014-15
Spring/Summer
2015-16
Spring/Summer
2016-17
Spring/Summer
Timetabling information
(a) Please indicate which teaching activities will be offered in this module:
LECTURE (LEC)
SEMINAR (SEM)
LABORATORY(LAB)
WORKSHOP (WRK)
(b) Timetabled
(c ) Student centrally allocated

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Max student numbers

Campus/mode e.g.
DE

YES
YES
NO
NO
YES/NO
YES/NO

Page 81

Mathematics Education 4207
1.
Short code
2.
Title
3.
Level
4.
Credit points
5.
Start term
6.
Subject
7.
8.
9.

10.
11.

EDS4207
Mathematics Education
7
20
January 2016
Secondary Initial Teacher
Education
Raza Kazim

Module Leader
Accredited by
Module restrictions
(a) Pre-requisite
EDS 3111
(b) Programme restriction
Secondary Teacher Education
(c) Level restrictions
(d) Other restrictions or requirements
Automatic deferral
None
Aims
The module builds on the learning and skills developed in EDS4200 Subject
Pedagogy and EDS3111 School experience 1 to enable students to deepen their understanding and skills necessary to operate as a critically reflective Mathematics
Teacher in a Secondary School. As such it supports students in the achievement of current requirements for the award of Qualified teacher status by responding flexibly to their identified needs.

12.

Learning outcomes
1. develop critical and evaluative perspectives on current debates in Secondary
Mathematics educationusing theoretical understandings and practical experience of teaching Citizenship in school
2. develop strategies for enhancing Mathematics Education within and beyond the school setting including across the curriculum
3. critically reflect on and evaluate their own practice of the teaching of Mathematics in the light of current theoretical developments
4. plan, teach, resource, evaluate and further develop effective Mathematics schemes of work and lessons for pupils for the age of 11 to 16
5. develop effective assessment strategies to monitor and enhance pupil progress formatively and summativelyincluding the critical analysis of pupil data

13.

Syllabus
This module is designed to support the professional development of trainees and to enable them to achieve good or outstanding outcomes. The syllabus is therefore flexible and arises from an analysis of the collective outcomes for the cohort from
SE1 and the first part of SE 2 as recorded on the Assessment of Teaching Standards form. Areas covered will include:
Assessing Mathematics
Planning Mathematics Lessons and Schemes of Work
Differentiation and developing targeted questioning
Working with other adults in a Mathematics context
Developing and evaluating Mathematics resources

14.

Learning, teaching and assessment strategy

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 82

This module is delivered through workshops. These model good practice in
Mathematics Education and are sometimes lead by the tutor and sometimes by students. They include presentations, resource development, discussion, communities of enquiry, classroom activities, games etc.
Student outcomes from SE 1 and the first stage of SE 2 are analysed to ensure that support is given to strengthen areas for development and consolidate and share good and outstanding practice
There are also regular tutorials for students to discuss their progress and school based work and targets are regularly set and reviewed
The module is supported by the VLE (Moodle) The module is supported through the
VLE (Moodle)The Moodle area is listed on Unihub under MyLearning. Moodle features a Maths Education Module. Within this area students engage with discussion groups, complete online quizzes, watch video material, download resources, upload material to share with others and complete assignments. All of these developments support the aim of developing a reflective practitioner.
Assessment Strategies
Students are formatively assessed through micro-teaching sharing good practice from schools on-going tutorials Students are summatively assesses on all through school experience
Most specifically Students undertake a Monitoring and Assessment assignment where they design, resource, teach and evaluate a scheme of work that reflects best practice in Mathematics Education and Assessment. Pupil progress is monitored and base line data used to establish progress. The scheme of work is evaluated in the light of an analysis of pupil’s progress and improvements recommended.
The scheme of work is evaluated in the light of an analysis of pupils’ progress and improvements recommended.
The assignment consists of a theoretical justification and evaluation for the scheme of work that they produce along with a detailed analysis of pupils progress. This consists of 3000 words.
The scheme of work, resources, lesson plans and samples of pupils work provide the evidence on which the analysis is based.
Students receive formative feedback on a proposal and a draft of the theoretical justification. 15.

16.
17.
18.

Assessment weighting
Seen examination
Unseen examination
Coursework (no examination)
Timetabled examination required
Length of exam
Learning materials

0%
0%
100 %
NO
n/a

There follows a sample reading list. All up to date reading lists are available at http://readinglists.mdx.ac.uk Essential

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 83

Chambers P. (2008)Teaching Mathematics Developing as a Reflective Secondary
TeacherLondon, Sage
Haggarty L. 2001 Teaching Mathematics in Secondary Schools London: Routledge
Johnston-Wilder, S. (et al eds) 2010, Learning to Teach Mathematics in the
Secondary School, London: Routledge
Tanner, H and Jones S (2000) Becoming a Successful Teacher of
Mathematics,London: Routledge
Recommended
Ollerton M.( 2003) Getting the Buggers to Add up London: Continuum
Malcolm Swann (2006) Collaborative Learning in Mathematics, London NRDC
Mike Ollerton (2009) Mathematics Teachers HandbookLondon: Continuum
Jo Boaler (2010)The Elephant in the Classroom (Helping Children learn and Love
Maths) London; Souvenir
Watson (2006) Raising Achievement in Secondary Mathematics Open University
Press
Websites http://www.ncetm.org.uk/ 19.

20.

Module run (NB. These should be set up 4 years in advance):
Academic Term
Part
Start End year of date date term 2013/14
Spring/Summer
2014/15
Spring Summer
2015/16
Spring/Summer
2016/17
Spring
/Summer
Timetabling information
(a) Please indicate which teaching activities will be offered in this module:
LECTURE (LEC)
SEMINAR (SEM)
LABORATORY(LAB)
WORKSHOP (WRK)
(b) Timetabled
(c ) Student centrally allocated

Music EducationEDS4209
1.
Short code
2.
Title
3.
Level
4.
Credit points
5.
Start term
6.
Subject
7.
8.
9.

Module Leader
Accredited by
Module restrictions [2000 characters]
(a) Pre-requisite
(b) Programme restriction
PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Max student numbers

Campus/mode e.g.
DE
HE
HE
HE
HE

YES/
YES/
/NO
NO
NO
NO

EDS4209
Music education 2
7
20
Jan 2016
Secondary Initial Teacher
Education
Josh Emdon

EDS 3111

Page 84

10.
11.

(c) Level restrictions
(d) Other restrictions or requirements
Automatic deferral [150 characters]
None
Aims
The module builds on the learning and skills developed in EDS4200 Subject
Pedagogy and EDS3111 School experience 1 to enable students to deepen their understanding and skills necessary to operate as a critically reflective Music Teacher in a Secondary School. As such it supports students in the achievement of current requirements for the award of Qualified teacher status by responding flexibly to their identified needs.

12.

Learning outcomes
On successful completion this module, the student will be able to develop critical and evaluative perspectives on current debates in Secondary Music educationusing theoretical understandings and practical experience of teaching Music in school
To develop strategies for enhancing Music Education and performing arts within and beyond the school setting (extra-curricular and community music participation)
Critically reflect and evaluate their own practice of the teaching of Music in the light of current theoretical developments plan, teach, resource, evaluate and further develop effective Music schemes of work and lessons for pupils for the age of 11 to 16 develop effective assessment strategies to monitor and enhance pupil progress formatively and summatively including critical analysis of pupil data

13.

Syllabus
This module is designed to support the professional development of trainees and to enable them to achieve good or outstanding outcomes. The syllabus is therefore flexible and arises from an analysis of the collective outcomes for the cohort from SE1 and the first part of SE 2 as recorded on the Assessment of Teaching Standards form.
Areas covered will include:
Developing Music Subject Knowledge
Developing musical and instrumental skills (including voice)
Planning Music Lessons and Schemes of Work with a focus on practical and musical learning Developing and evaluating Music resources
Developing whole class teaching strategies (performing, improvising and workshopping) Developing strategies for singing in the classroom
GCSE, Btec and A level Music, Music Technology and Performing Arts
Teaching and learning with music technology
Differentiation with a focus on differentiation by task
Working with other adults in a Musical context
Developing conducting and rehearsing skills both within and beyond the classroom
Developing and refining skills required to run effective extra curricular provision
Music in the community of the school and beyond (including Primary Music)
Assessing Music

14.

Learning, teaching and assessment strategy
This module is delivered through a mixture of workshops, seminars and school visits.
These model good practice in Music Education and are sometimes lead by the tutor and sometimes by students. They include presentations, resource development, discussion, classroom activities, games etc. Visits to partnership schools form part of

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 85

the learning, especially in the field of music technology.
Student outcomes from SE 1 and the first stage of SE 2 are analysed to ensure that support is given to strengthen areas for development and consolidate and share good and outstanding practice
There are also regular tutorials for students to discuss their progress and school based work and targets are regularly set and reviewed.
The module is supported through the VLE (Moodle) The module is supported through the VLE (Moodle)The Moodle area is listed on Unihub under MyLearning. Moodle features a Music Education Module. Within this area students engage with discussion groups, complete online quizzes, watch video material, download resources, upload material to share with others and complete assignments. All of these developments support the aim of developing a reflective practitioner.
Assessment Strategies
Students are formatively assessed through micro-teaching, sharing good practice from schools and on-going tutorials.
Students are summatively assessed on all LOs
Through a Monitoring and Assessment assignment. Here they design, resource, teach and evaluate a scheme of work that reflects best practice in Citizenship Education and
Assessment. Pupil progress is monitored and base line data used to establish progress. The scheme of work is evaluated in the light of an analysis of pupils’ progress and improvements recommended.
The assignment consists of a theoretical justification and evaluation for the scheme of work that they produce along with a detailed analysis of pupils progress. This consists of 3000 words.
The scheme of work, resources, lesson plans and samples of pupils work provide the evidence on which the analysis is based.
Students receive formative feedback on a proposal and a draft of the theoretical justification. 15.

16.
17.
18.

Assessment weighting
Seen examination
Unseen examination
Coursework (no examination)
Timetabled examination required
Length of exam
Learning materials

0%
0%
100 %
NO
n/a

There follows a sample reading list. All up to date reading lists are available at http://readinglists.mdx.ac.uk Essential
Mills, J. (2005)* Music in The School, Oxford, OUP
Philpott, C (2000)* Learning to Teach Music in the Secondary School, London,
Routledge
Ofsted (2012) Music in Schools: Promoting good Practice: http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/subject-professional-development-materials- PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 86

music-schools-promoting-good-practice
Recommended
Green, L (2008) Music, Informal Learning and the School; Ashgate
Ofsted (2012) Music in schools: Wider still and wider: http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/music-schools-wider-still-and-wider The national plan for music: https://www.education.gov.uk/publications/standard/AllPublications/Page1/DFE00086-2011 Web Sites
Musical Futures https://www.musicalfutures.org/ http://www.dsokids.com (Dallas Symphony Orchestra – some good resources on instruments of the orchestra) http://www.singup.org (KS2 based but some good resources if your school subscribes) http://www.mtrs.co.uk (Music Teachers Resource Centre)
Associations:
http://www.name.org.uk (National Association of Music Educators)
19.

20.

Module run (NB. These should be set up 4 years in advance): Academ Term
Part of
Start
End ic year term date date 2013-14 Spring/s ummer 2014-15 Spring/
Summer
2015/16 Spring/
Summer
2016/17 Spring/
Summer
Timetabling information
(a) Please indicate which teaching activities will be offered in this module:
LECTURE (LEC)
SEMINAR (SEM)
LABORATORY(LAB)
WORKSHOP (WRK)
(b) Timetabled
(c ) Student centrally allocated

Science with Biology EducationEDS4211
1.
Short code
2.
Title
3.
Level
4.
Credit points
5.
Start term
6.
Subject

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Max student numbers Campus/mode
e.g. DE
HE
HE
HE
HE

YES
YES
NO
NO
NO

EDS 4211
Science with Biology Education
7
30
Jan 2016
Secondary Initial Teacher

Page 87

7.
8.
9.

10.
11.

Education
Module Leader
Edwin Ellis
Accredited by
Module restrictions
(a) Pre-requisite
EDS3111
(b) Programme restriction
Secondary Teacher Education
(c) Level restrictions
(d) Other restrictions or requirements
Automatic deferral
None
Aims
The module builds on the learning and skills developed in EDS 4200 Subject
Pedagogy and EDS 3111 School Experience to enable students to deepen their understanding and skills necessary to operate as critically reflective Science with
Biology Teachers in Secondary Schools. As such it supports students in the achievement of current requirements for the award of Qualified teacher status by responding flexibly to their identified needs.

12.

Learning outcomes
On successful completion this module, the student will be able to
1. To develop critical and evaluative perspectives on current debates in Secondary
Education in particular Science with their science specialism using theoretical understandings and practical experience of teaching Science in school with their science specialism
2. To develop strategies for enhancing Science Education with their science specialism within and beyond the school setting emphasising active learning pedagogy
3. To critically reflect and evaluate their own practice of the teaching of Science with their science specialism in the light of current theoretical developments
4. To plan, teach, resource, evaluate and further develop effective Science schemes of work and lessons for pupils for the age range 11 to 16 with post 16 enhancementwith their science specialism
5. To develop effective assessment strategies to monitor and enhance pupil progress formatively and summativelyincluding critical analysis of pupil data

13.

Syllabus
This module is designed to support the professional development of trainees and to enable them to achieve good or outstanding outcomes. The syllabus is therefore flexible and arises from an analysis of the collective outcomes for the cohort from
EDS3111 and the first part of EDS 3112 as recorded on the Assessment of Teaching
Standards form.
Areas covered will include
Building on EDS 4200 and developing further the pegagogy that underpins the development of best practice in teaching science and their science specialism
Developing further science subject knowledge with their science specialism
Developing and evaluating science resources with their science specialism including practical work
Assessment for learning and summative assessment of science with their science specialism Planning science schemes of work with their science specialism
Differentiation for gifted pupils and those with SEN and EAL
Supporting pupils’ literacy and numeracy needs in science with their science specialism Working with other adults in a science context with their science specialism
Development and support of active learning projects: increasing learner autonomy

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 88

Teaching Science across the curriculum with their science specialism
Science in the media with their science specialism
Working with other science education settings to enhance Science Education with their science specialism

14.

Learning, teaching and assessment strategy
This module is delivered mainly through workshops and there may be lectures. These are intended to model good practice in science teaching and are sometimes lead by the tutor and sometimes by students. They include presentations, resource development, discussion, communities of enquiry, classroom activities including practical work. Visits are undertaken to schools, museums etc.
Student outcomes from EDS 3111 and the first stage of EDS3112 are analysed to ensure that support is given to strengthen areas for development and consolidate and share good and outstanding practice
There are also tutorials for students to discuss their progress and school based work and targets are regularly set and reviewed
The module is supported by the VLE (Moodle) The module is supported through the
VLE (Moodle)The Moodle area is listed on Unihub under MyLearning. Moodle features a Science Education Module. Within this area students engage with discussion groups, complete online quizzes, watch video material, download resources, upload material to share with others and complete assignments. All of these developments support the aim of developing a reflective practitioner.
Assessment Strategies
Students are formatively assessed through micro-teaching, sharing good practice from schools and on-going tutorials.
Students are summatively assessed on all the learning outcomes through a Monitoring and Assessment (M&A) assignment in which they design, resource, teach and evaluate a scheme of work that reflects best practice in teaching and assessing their specialist science subject. Pupil progress is monitored and base line data used to establish progress. The scheme of work is evaluated in the light of an analysis of pupils’ progress and improvements recommended.
The assignment consists of a theoretical justification and evaluation for the scheme of work that they produce along with a detailed analysis of pupils progress. This consists of 3000 words.
The scheme of work, resources, lesson plans and samples of pupils work provide the evidence on which the analysis is based. This is not assessed.
Students receive formative feedback on a proposal and a draft of the theoretical justification. 15.

Assessment weighting
Seen examination
Unseen examination
Coursework (no examination)

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

0%
0%
100 %

Page 89

16.
17.
18.

Timetabled examination required
Length of exam
Learning materials

NO
Not applicable

There follows a sample reading list. All up to date reading lists are available at http://readinglists.mdx.ac.uk Essential
Ed. Martin Hollins (2011)ASE guide to Secondary Science: New Edition.Hatfield:
Association for Science Education, ASE.
Toplis, R (2011) How Science WorksRoutledge
Ed.Reiss, Michael (2011) ASE Science Practice Teaching Secondary Biology: New
Edition.Hodder Education
Recommended
Black, P et al (2003)Assessment for Learning: Putting It Into PracticeOpen University,
McGraw-Hill
Holden and Cooke (2004)Meeting SEN in the Curriculum: Science David Fulton
Alderman T (2008) Meeting the Needs of Your Most Able Pupils: Science Taylor &
Francis
19.

20.

Module run (NB. These should be set up 4 years in advance):
Academic Term
Part
Start End year of date date term 2013-14
Spring/Summer
2014-15
Spring/Summer
2015-16
Spring/Summer
2016-17
Spring/Summer
Timetabling information
(a) Please indicate which teaching activities will be offered in this module:
LECTURE (LEC)
SEMINAR (SEM)
LABORATORY(LAB)
WORKSHOP (WRK)
(b) Timetabled
(c ) Student centrally allocated

Science with Chemistry EducationEDS4212
1.
Short code
2.
Title
3.
Level
4.
Credit points
5.
Start term
6.
Subject
7.
8.
9.

Module Leader
Accredited by
Module restrictions
(a) Pre-requisite
(b) Programme restriction

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Max student numbers

Campus/mode e.g. DE
HE
HE
HE
HE

YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES/NO

EDS 4212
Science with Chemistry Education
7
30
Jan 2016
Secondary Initial Teacher
Education
Edwin Ellis

EDS3111
Secondary Teacher Education

Page 90

10.
11.

(c) Level restrictions
(d) Other restrictions or requirements
Automatic deferral
None
Aims
The module builds on the learning and skills developed in EDS 4200 Subject
Pedagogy and EDS 3111 School Experience to enable students to deepen their understanding and skills necessary to operate as critically reflective Science with
Chemistry Teachers in Secondary Schools. As such it supports students in the achievement of current requirements for the award of Qualified teacher status by responding flexibly to their identified needs.

12.

Learning outcomes
Knowledge
On successful completion this module, the student will be able to
1. To develop critical and evaluative perspectives on current debates in Secondary
Education in particular Science with their science specialism using theoretical understandings and practical experience of teaching Science in school with their science specialism
2. To develop strategies for enhancing Science Education with their science specialism within and beyond the school setting emphasising active learning pedagogy
3. To critically reflect and evaluate their own practice of the teaching of Science with their science specialism in the light of current theoretical developments
4. To plan, teach, resource, evaluate and further develop effective Science schemes of work and lessons for pupils for the age range 11 to 16 with post 16 enhancementwith their science specialism
5. To develop effective assessment strategies to monitor and enhance pupil progress formatively and summativelyincluding critical analysis of pupil data

13.

Syllabus
This module is designed to support the professional development of trainees and to enable them to achieve good or outstanding outcomes. The syllabus is therefore flexible and arises from an analysis of the collective outcomes for the cohort from
EDS3111 and the first part of EDS 3112 as recorded on the Assessment of Teaching
Standards form.
Areas covered will include
Building on EDS 4200 and developing further the pegagogy that underpins the development of best practice in teaching science and their science specialism
Developing further science subject knowledge with their science specialism
Developing and evaluating science resources with their science specialism including practical work
Assessment for learning and summative assessment of science with their science specialism Planning science schemes of work with their science specialism
Differentiation for gifted pupils and those with SEN and EAL
Supporting pupils’ literacy and numeracy needs in science with their science specialism Working with other adults in a science context with their science specialism
Development and support of active learning projects: increasing learner autonomy
Teaching Science across the curriculum with their science specialism
Science in the media with their science specialism
Working with other science education settings to enhance Science Education with their science specialism

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 91

14.

Learning, teaching and assessment strategy
This module is delivered mainly through workshops and there may be lectures. These are intended to model good practice in science teaching and are sometimes lead by the tutor and sometimes by students. They include presentations, resource development, discussion, communities of enquiry, classroom activities including practical work. Visits are undertaken to schools, museums etc.
Student outcomes from EDS 3111 and the first stage of EDS3112 are analysed to ensure that support is given to strengthen areas for development and consolidate and share good and outstanding practice
There are also tutorials for students to discuss their progress and school based work and targets are regularly set and reviewed
The module is supported by the VLE (Moodle) The module is supported through the
VLE (Moodle)The Moodle area is listed on Unihub under MyLearning. Moodle features a Science Education Module. Within this area students engage with discussion groups, complete online quizzes, watch video material, download resources, upload material to share with others and complete assignments. All of these developments support the aim of developing a reflective practitioner.
Assessment Strategies
Students are formatively assessed through micro-teaching, sharing good practice from schools and on-going tutorials.
Students are summatively assessed on all the learning outcomes through a Monitoring and Assessment (M&A) assignment in which they design, resource, teach and evaluate a scheme of work that reflects best practice in teaching and assessing their specialist science subject. Pupil progress is monitored and base line data used to establish progress. The scheme of work is evaluated in the light of an analysis of pupils’ progress and improvements recommended.
The assignment consists of a theoretical justification and evaluation for the scheme of work that they produce along with a detailed analysis of pupils progress. This consists of 3000 words.
The scheme of work, resources, lesson plans and samples of pupils work provide the evidence on which the analysis is based.
Students receive formative feedback on a proposal and a draft of the theoretical justification. 15.

Assessment weighting
Seen examination
Unseen examination
Coursework (no examination)

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

0%
0%
100 %

Page 92

16.
17.
18.

Timetabled examination required
Length of exam
Learning materials

NO
Not applicable

There follows a sample reading list. All up to date reading lists are available at http://readinglists.mdx.ac.uk Essential
Ed. Martin Hollins (2011)ASE guide to Secondary Science: New Edition.Hatfield:
Association for Science Education, ASE.
Toplis, R (2011) How Science WorksRoutledge
Ed.Taber, Keith (2011) ASE Science Practice Teaching Secondary Chemistry: New
Edition.Hodder Education
Recommended
Black, P et al (2003)Assessment for Learning: Putting It Into PracticeOpen University,
McGraw-Hill
Holden and Cooke (2004)Meeting SEN in the Curriculum: Science David Fulton
Alderman T (2008) Meeting the Needs of Your Most Able Pupils: Science Taylor &
Francis
19.

20.

Module run (NB. These should be set up 4 years in advance):
Academic Term
Part
Start End year of date date term 2013-14
Spring/Summer
2014-15
Spring/Summer
2015-16
Spring/Summer
2016-17
Spring/Summer
Timetabling information
(a) Please indicate which teaching activities will be offered in this module:
LECTURE (LEC)
SEMINAR (SEM)
LABORATORY(LAB)
WORKSHOP (WRK)
(b) Timetabled
(c ) Student centrally allocated

Science with Physics EducationEDS4213
1.
Short code
2.
Title
3.
Level
4.
Credit points
5.
Start term
6.
Subject
7.
8.
9.

Module Leader
Accredited by
Module restrictions
(a) Pre-requisite
(b) Programme restriction

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Max student numbers

Campus/mode e.g. DE
HE
HE
HE
HE

YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES/NO

EDS 4213
Science with Physics Education
7
30
Jan 2016
Secondary Initial Teacher
Education
Edwin Ellis

EDS3111
Secondary Teacher Education

Page 93

10.
11.

12.

13.

(c) Level restrictions
(d) Other restrictions or requirements
Automatic deferral
None
Aims
The module builds on the learning and skills developed in EDS 4200 Subject
Pedagogy and EDS 3111 School Experience to enable students to deepen their understanding and skills necessary to operate as critically reflective Science with
Physics Teachers in Secondary Schools. As such it supports students in the achievement of current requirements for the award of Qualified teacher status by responding flexibly to their identified needs.
Learning outcomes
Learning outcomes
On successful completion this module, the student will be able to
1. To develop critical and evaluative perspectives on current debates in Secondary
Education in particular Science with their science specialismusing theoretical understandings and practical experience of teaching Science in school with their science specialism.
2. To develop strategies for enhancing Science Education with their science specialism within and beyond the school setting emphasising active learning pedagogy
3. To critically reflect and evaluate their own practice of the teaching of Science with their science specialism in the light of current theoretical developments
4. To plan, teach, resource, evaluate and further develop effective Science schemes of work and lessons for pupils for the age range 11 to 16 with post 16 enhancementwith their science specialism
5. To develop effective assessment strategies to monitor and enhance pupil progress formatively and summativelyincluding critical analysis of pupil data
Syllabus
This module is designed to support the professional development of trainees and to enable them to achieve good or outstanding outcomes. The syllabus is therefore flexible and arises from an analysis of the collective outcomes for the cohort from
EDS3111 and the first part of EDS 3112 as recorded on the Assessment of Teaching
Standards form.
Areas covered will include
Building on EDS 4200 and developing further the pegagogy that underpins the development of best practice in teaching science and their science specialism
Developing further science subject knowledge with their science specialism
Developing and evaluating science resources with their science specialism including practical work
Assessment for learning and summative assessment of science with their science specialism Planning science schemes of work with their science specialism
Differentiation for gifted pupils and those with SEN and EAL
Supporting pupils’ literacy and numeracy needs in science with their science specialism Working with other adults in a science context with their science specialism
Development and support of active learning projects: increasing learner autonomy
Teaching Science across the curriculum with their science specialism
Science in the media with their science specialism
Working with other science education settings to enhance Science Education with their science specialism

14.

Learning, teaching and assessment strategy

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 94

This module is delivered mainly through workshops and there may be lectures. These are intended to model good practice in science teaching and are sometimes lead by the tutor and sometimes by students. They include presentations, resource development, discussion, communities of enquiry, classroom activities including practical work. Visits are undertaken to schools, museums etc.
Student outcomes from EDS 3111 and the first stage of EDS3112 are analysed to ensure that support is given to strengthen areas for development and consolidate and share good and outstanding practice
There are also tutorials for students to discuss their progress and school based work and targets are regularly set and reviewed
The module is supported by the VLE (Moodle) The module is supported through the
VLE (Moodle)The Moodle area is listed on Unihub under MyLearning. Moodle features a Science Education Module. Within this area students engage with discussion groups, complete online quizzes, watch video material, download resources, upload material to share with others and complete assignments. All of these developments support the aim of developing a reflective practitioner.
Assessment Strategies
Students are formatively assessed through micro-teaching, sharing good practice from schools and on-going tutorials.
Students are summatively assessed on all the learning outcomes through a Monitoring and Assessment (M&A) assignment in which they design, resource, teach and evaluate a scheme of work that reflects best practice in teaching and assessing their specialist science subject. Pupil progress is monitored and base line data used to establish progress. The scheme of work is evaluated in the light of an analysis of pupils’ progress and improvements recommended.
The assignment consists of a theoretical justification and evaluation for the scheme of work that they produce along with a detailed analysis of pupils progress. This consists of 3000 words.
The scheme of work, resources, lesson plans and samples of pupils work provide the evidence on which the analysis is based. This is not assessed.

15.

16.
17.
18.

Students receive formative feedback on a proposal and a draft of the theoretical justification. Assessment weighting
Seen examination
0%
Unseen examination
0%
Coursework (no examination)
100 %
Timetabled examination required
NO
Length of exam
Not applicable
Learning materials
There follows a sample reading list. All up to date reading lists are available at http://readinglists.mdx.ac.uk Essential
Ed. Martin Hollins (2011)ASE guide to Secondary Science: New Edition.Hatfield:
Association for Science Education, ASE.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 95

Toplis, R (2011) How Science WorksRoutledge
Ed.Sang, David (2011) ASE Science Practice Teaching Secondary Physics: New
Edition.Hodder Education
Recommended
Black, P et al (2003)Assessment for Learning: Putting It Into PracticeOpen University,
McGraw-Hill
Holden and Cooke (2004)Meeting SEN in the Curriculum: Science David Fulton
Alderman T (2008) Meeting the Needs of Your Most Able Pupils: Science Taylor &
Francis
Module run (NB. These should be set up 4 years in advance):
Academic Term
Part
Start End Max
Campus/mode e.g. DE year of date date student term numbers
2013-14
Spring/Summer
HE
2014-15
Spring/Summer
HE
2015-16
Spring/Summer
HE
2016-17
Spring/Summer
HE
Timetabling information
(a) Please indicate which teaching activities will be offered in this module:
LECTURE (LEC)
YES
SEMINAR (SEM)
YES
LABORATORY(LAB)
YES
WORKSHOP (WRK)
YES
(b) Timetabled
YES
(c ) Student centrally allocated
YES/NO

19.

20.

7. Annexes
Annexe 1: Fitness to Practice Policy and Procedure
Supplementary Information relevant to the operation of the Education Fitness for
Practice Sub-panel
1.

Standards of professional conduct

Programme
Secondary ITT
Programmes
PGCE Secondary (all subjects) School Direct Secondary
2.

Education Professional Programmes - Fitness for Practice Sub-panel membership







3.

Conduct guidance
Teachers’ Standards http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/teachingandlearning/reviewofstanda rds
Code of Conduct and link to Fitness for Practice Policy and Education
Annexes can be found in Programme Handbooks and on Moodle

Head of Education (Chair) and/or
Teacher Education Partnerships Manager (Deputy Chair)
2 members of academic staff from professional programmes (minimum)
1 Partnership representative (minimum)
1 Independent member of academic staff (non-ITT)
Administrative Officer, Education – Officer to sub-panel

Arrangements for reporting and review of activities,

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 96

A report of the activities of the Education Fitness for Practice Sub-panel will be undertaken at the end of each academic year and reported in the relevant quality monitoring reports and to the Partnership
Steering Group. Reports will also be submitted to the School of Health and Education Fitness for
Practice Committee. A summary report will be extracted from the various reports and held in readiness for 2-day notice Ofsted Inspections.
4.

Authority for determining whether a referral falls under the auspices of the FtP arrangements Students will be recommended for referral to the Fitness for Practice sub-panel either by an
Assessment Board or a Director of Programmes if the concerns arise in between assessment periods.
The final decision about whether a referral should be made to the Fitness for Practice sub-panel will be made by the Chair or Deputy Chair of the sub-panel.
5.

Requirements of the Department for Education and National College for Teaching and
Leadership (executive agency) in assessing Fitness for Practice

The Initial Teacher Training Criteria (2012) states that all accredited ITT providers must ensure:
C3.3 That they comply with all current legislation relevant to ITT.
C3.4 That they monitor, evaluate and moderate all aspects of provision rigorously and demonstrate how these contribute to securing improvements in the quality of training and the assessment of trainees. Health and Disability Panel (Education): Terms of Reference
1
Introduction
The Health and Disability Panel functions as a sub-committee of the Education Fitness for Practice sub-panel and is established to provide a consistent approach across programmes with regard to the management and support for students with a disability or health issue (as identified by Occupational health). 2
Principles of Operation
The Health and Disability Panel aims to ensure that:
• The University complies with its duty of care to students and to those with whom they come into contact
• The University complies with the requirements of the Disability Discrimination Act
• Students with health and disability issues are not disadvantaged, nor put at risk
• Students with health and disability issues are treated with transparency and fairness
3








Terms of reference
To ensure that students with health and disability issues are given appropriate support and all reasonable adjustments are made to support them on their programme.
To regularly review students with health and disability issues affecting their programme, and maintain confidentiality of such discussions.
To support programme leaders with the monitoring of individual students.
To ensure parity and fairness of approach to all students
To consider occupational health reports that make recommendations and require adjustments in their programme, including practice placements, taking Fitness for Practice into consideration. To refer cases to the Fitness for Practice Panel where occupational health report recommendations cannot be accommodated.

4
Mode of Operation
The Chair convenes a sub-panel of members of the panel to review any Occupational Health Reports that require consideration. The panel meets as required to review all cases but the majority of the work will happen as part of the recruitment cycle, during induction and following annual re-affirmation for (undergraduates only).
5

Membership

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 97






A Director of Programmes (Chair)
Programme Leaders of the person(s) concerned
A member of the Education Leadership Team (in addition to the Chair)
Members may also be co-opted for specific advice, e.g. from the University Disability
Support Unit.

Code of Conduct for trainee Teachers
1. Introduction
As a student of Middlesex University what you do as a trainee teacher will have a big impact on the pupils and staff in the schools, colleges and settings where your training takes place.
This code of conduct has been agreed across the University in consultation with the partnership and it sets out the standards that you are expected to work to during your training programme.
This code is based on the guiding principle of protecting pupils and it mirrors the standards that are expected of all the teachers that you will work alongside.
2. Teachers’ Standards Part Two: Personal and Profession Conduct
The Teachers’ Standards (DfE 2012) set a clear baseline of expectations for the professional practice and conduct of teachers and define the minimum level of practice expected of teachers in England.
This code of conduct is based on Part Two of the Teachers’ Standards which states:
A teacher is expected to demonstrate consistently high standards of personal and professional conduct. The following statements define the behaviour and attitudes which set the required standard for conduct throughout a teacher’s career.

• Teachers uphold public trust in the profession and maintain high standards of ethics and behaviour, within and outside school, by: o o o o

treating pupils with dignity, building relationships rooted in mutual respect, and at all times observing proper boundaries appropriate to a teacher’s professional position having regard for the need to safeguard pupils’ well-being, in accordance with statutory provisions showing tolerance of and respect for the rights of others not undermining fundamental British values, including democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect, and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs ensuring that personal beliefs are not expressed in ways which exploit pupils’ vulnerability or might lead them to break the law.



Teachers must have proper and professional regard for the ethos, policies and practices of the school in which they teach, and maintain high standards in their own attendance and punctuality. •

Teachers must have an understanding of, and always act within, the statutory frameworks which set out their professional duties and responsibilities.

3. What this code means for you
All trainee teachers must do their utmost to comply with this code, and any breach of this code whilst training will be investigated and dealt with by the Programme Leaders and school Mentors who are required to deal with this under the University Regulations (section on student conduct and discipline) and where appropriate under the Fitness for Practice Policy of the School of Health and Education.
The Fitness for Practice Policy can be found in your Programme Handbook. Please also note the
Dress Code for trainee teachers (Annexe 4).

Dress Code for Professional/Educational Settings
Policy: Middlesex University imposes no dress code on its students. It welcomes diversity of appearance in general terms. However, education students and trainee teachers do need to consider the teaching context in which they will work in terms of health and safety and professional appropriateness.

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 98

Guidance for trainees on Initial Teacher Training Programmes: Appearance is one part of ensuring other professionals, parents and pupils can have confidence in you in the work-place. As a general rule in an educational setting, clothing should be of a smart-casual, conservative nature and should not restrict easy movement. Clothing should cover the body (bare midriffs, for example, are not acceptable). In some settings jewellery or facial piercing are not appropriate. The face should be uncovered when working in educational settings.
Guidance to ensure health and safety for teaching Physical Education: trainees are expected to change their clothing and footwear when teaching Physical Education and for the university training sessions held in a local school. Further guidance is provided by the Association for Physical
Education publication ‘Safe Practice in Physical Education and School Sport’. This document was revised and reprinted in 2008. In particular, students should ensure that:
Any clothing worn to comply with a faith commitment is appropriate to the activity being taught. It should be comfortable and allow for freedom of movement. Clothing that is loose or free flowing is generally not suitable for most physical activities and may compromise both safety of the wearer (e.g in gymnastics) and others in close proximity (e.g. invasion games). Headscarves where worn, are tight, secured in a safe manner and unlikely to catch on anything that may put the wearer at risk.
Chapter 11: p 81
If there is any reason why you may not feel able to comply with any of the above you must discuss this with your course tutor immediately. Students or trainees who breach this dress code should be aware that they may be referred to the Fitness for Practice Panel should they refuse to comply.

Annexe 2: Withdrawal from Study Form
You should visit the following page on Unihub for further information on the University’s formal regulations about withdrawal, and to download the ‘Withdrawal From Study’ Form: http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/your-study/withdrawal PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 99

Annexe 3: PGCE Secondary ITT Withdrawal / Interruption Supplement
CONFIDENTIAL
Academic Year: 2015/2016
This form should be completed during an exit interview for trainees who interrupt/withdraw from the secondary PGCE course. trainee’s Name:
School Placement:

PGCE Subject:
Interviewer/s:

Please tick the relevant box: Deferral □

Withdrawal □

Start date of Deferral/ Withdrawal:
Please record further details regarding trainee’s reasons for leaving the course using the headings below as appropriate:
Personal issues

School placement issues

University issues

trainees future intentions

Refund/Withdrawal Policy
I am aware that any student withdrawing/ interrupting their studies needs to confirm the extent of any financial implications with their campus finance office.

More information available from: http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/your-study/withdrawal trainee’s Signature: ……………………………

Interviewer’s Signature: ……………

Today’s Date: …………………………………

Date: ……………………………………

Copies to PGCE Secondary Administrator and Eddie Ellis, Secondary Programme Director.
Office Note:
Fee Payment due: yes – no

PGCE Secondary Programme Handbook 2015-16

Page 100

Similar Documents

Free Essay

Memo

...including: Published annually. Based on the current standards and requirements provided by AICPA, the reference book will create or upgrade the latest information a new edition every year. It includes all the situations that happen in business and the proper way to solve these problems. Enhanced Job Performance. The content in this book is divided into several parts, and its unique modular format makes people easy to find the situations they meet in business. Some of latest information which is not free to download also can be found in this reference book. It reduces the times of looking for and purchasing sources on the Internet, thereby saving time for employees who work in financial department. Develop abilities. The book also is a handbook for those people who want to take CPA exams, and our company will advance if there are more professional employees in the financial department. The more professionals we have, the higher reputation our company has in the same industry. Conclusion This book has the most effective system available to solve accounting problems, which has been proven for over thirty years, and it is worth...

Words: 263 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Handbook

...Axia College First-Year Sequence Short Form Writing Style Handbook 2009 © 2009, 2007 University of Phoenix. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. The text of this publication, or any part thereof, may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, storage in an information retrieval system, or otherwise, without prior permission of University of Phoenix. Edited in accordance with The Apollo Group editorial standards and practices. Introduction This short form writing style guide has been specially created for the First-Year Sequence of courses at Axia College. It is based on the more complete Axia College’s Writing Style Handbook that you will rely on and be held accountable for in your courses after your first year at Axia College. The purpose of this guide is to provide the basic rules necessary for writing papers that are consistent in style, formatting, and respect the intellectual property rights of experts whose material you refer to in your formal papers. If you have any questions about what these rules mean or how to use them, always check with your instructor. Font Styles * All text must be written in the same font. * Use Times New Roman, Arial, or Courier, 12-point size. * Use italics sparingly for emphasis; do not use bold, underlining, or all capital letters. Margins * Use 1-inch margins on all sides of each page. * Justify the left side of the......

Words: 1264 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

The Handbook

...National Institute of Standards and Technology Technology Administration U.S. Department of Commerce An Introduction to Computer Security: The NIST Handbook Special Publication 800-12 User Issues Assurance Contingency Planning I&A Training Personnel Access Controls Audit Planning Risk Management Crypto Physical Security Policy Support & Operations Program Management Threats Table of Contents I. INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW Chapter 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Intended Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Important Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Legal Foundation for Federal Computer Security Programs . 3 3 4 5 7 Chapter 2 ELEMENTS OF COMPUTER SECURITY 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 Computer Security Supports the Mission of the Organization. 9 Computer Security is an Integral Element of Sound Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Computer Security Should Be Cost-Effective. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Computer Security Responsibilities and Accountability Should Be......

Words: 93564 - Pages: 375

Free Essay

Handbook

...NATIONAL SCIENCE CLUB MONTH 2015 NATIONAL SCIENCE CLUBS SUMMIT September 5-6, 2015 STUDENT FACILITATOR’S HANDBOOK I. Event Description September is considered the National Science Club Month (NSCM) under Presidential Proclamation No. 264. During the NSCM, the Philippine Society of Youth Science Clubs (PSYSC) conducts activities that encourage the youth to actively participate in the science clubbing movement. Through these activities, PSYSC aims to provide a venue for the interaction of science clubs and to recognize excellence through workshops and friendly competitions. The three (3) main events that will kick-off this year’s NSCM are the National Science Clubs Summit (Summit), PSYSC Science Olympiad (PSO), and I Teach Science Seminar (ITSS). The National Science Clubs Summit (SUMMIT) is a one and a half-day gathering of high school science club affiliates, conducted simultaneously in different regions. The event is an opportunity for the different science clubs to learn from lectures, workshops, and plenary session. The SUMMIT brings the camp experience closer to our affiliates who are not able to attend the National Youth Science Technology and Environment Summer Camp (NYSTESC). Exciting trademark activities of SUMMIT include Sub-camp Quiz Competition and fun-filled Science workshops. SUMMIT also offers the chance to experience MathSciAKA, an event which provides set of interactive workshops. Date: September 5-6, 2015 ...

Words: 2202 - Pages: 9

Free Essay

Handbook

...Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics STUDENT’S HANDBOOK 2011/2012 Lazarski University Warsaw, June 2011 1 Lazarski School of Commerce and Law Student’s Handbook- Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics Content Page 4 6 8 13 15 15 15 17 17 18 19 21 23 24 26 28 30 32 34 35 37 39 41 43 44 46 48 49 50 51 53 54 55 57 58 59 60 62 63 63 64 66 67 69 72 74 75 76 77 79 80 82 The Programme The Degree Assessment Quality Assurance Admission Procedures Erasmus Study in BABE Programme Administrative Issues Course Descriptors Mathematics Introductory Microeconomics Introduction to Sociology Current Issues of the European and Global Economy Academic Writing Introduction into Business Introductory Macroeconomics Introduction into Economic Analysis Economics of Integration Information Technology Intermediate Microeconomics Issues in Macroeconomic Policy Mathematical Economics Statistics Regional Economics Introduction to Strategic Management Banking and Finance International Business Law Research Proseminar Accounting Managerial Economics International Economics Intermediate Macroeconomics Econometrics Research Methods Social Policy Game Theory Public Finance Investment Analysis BA Seminar Electives Financial Accounting Monetary Theory and Policy - The Impact of Global Crisis Principles of Marketing The World Economy – Retrospective View The Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME) Sector Economics of Telecommunication Demography and Economics of Contemporary European Migration......

Words: 47436 - Pages: 190

Premium Essay

Handbook

...Welcome to Rodney’s Italian and Grill Welcome to Rodney’s Italian and Grill Dear Employee, We are pleased to welcome you into our business family. As a new member of our family, we have prepared this handbook to further acquaint you with our organizations and help answer any initial questions you might have. Our goals are simple – to furnish a clean, comfortable and interesting atmosphere, and provide quality food with professional service. When we accomplish these goals efficiently, our customers will be satisfied and will continue to visit Horn’s Bar and The Yankee Rebel Tavern. They will also recommend us to their friends and thereby help build our business. You play an important role in reaching these goals and we want to know you have our support and in order to help you understand what we expect we have created this policy handbook. Each policy is explained in an uncomplicated manner. The fulfillment of the policies in this handbook are conditions for your employment. Discuss any questions you might have with your manager, office manager or one of us. We wish you much success with our companies and hope you find working with us here on Mackinac Island a rewarding experience. Sincerely, Rodney Code, Owner TABLE OF CONTENTS Section A FOR THE RECORD Background information on the restaurant and rules of the house. In this section you will also find hiring and payroll policies. ...

Words: 4723 - Pages: 19

Premium Essay

Handbook

...Few inventions have changed how people live and experience the world as deeply as the invention of the airplane. During the both World Wars, government subsidies and demands for new airplanes vastly improved techniques for designing and building them. Following the Second World War, the first commercial airplane routes were set up in Europe. The industry has progressed to the point now where it would be hard to think of life without air travel. It has shortened travel time and altered our concept of distance, making it possible for us to visit and conduct business in places once considered remote. If the airline industry could be described in three words, they would be "intensely competitive market." In recent years there has been an industry-wide shakedown will have far-reaching effects on the industry’s trend towards expanding domestic and international services. Originally, the airline industry was either partly or wholly government owned. This is still true in many countries, but in the United States all major airlines are private. This airline industry is classified into four categories by the Department of Transportation (DOT): International - 130+ seat planes that have the ability to take passengers just about anywhere in the world. Companies in this category typically have annual revenue of $1 Billion or more. National - usually these airlines seat 100-150 people and have revenues between $100 million and $1 billion. Regional - companies with......

Words: 1262 - Pages: 6

Free Essay

Handbook

...Creative Care Child Care Centers Parent Handbook of Policies and Procedures Revised 06/2012 PARENT HANDBOOK FOR CREATIVE CARE CHILD CARE CENTERS TABLE OF CONTENTS Mission Statement Welcome Program Philosophy Licensing Information Governmental Licensing Information Accreditation Information Enrollment Tuition Payment Schedule Late Payments Subsidized Care Scholarship Program Multiple Child Discounts Confidentiality Mandated Reporting of Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect Policy No. 1 2 3 4 4.1 4.2 5 6 6.1 6.2 6.4 6.3 6.5 7 8 9 9.1 9.2 9.4 Parent Code of Conduct Swearing/Cursing Threatening of Staff, Parents or Children Physical/Verbal Punishment of Your Children or other children 9.3 Smoking Not abiding by Safety Policy 9.5 Confrontational Interactions with Employees, other parents And Associates of [CREATIVE CARE CHILD CARE CENTERS] Violating the Confidentiality Policy Parents Right to Immediate Access Dismissal Withdraw 9.7 10 9.6 11 12 Court Orders Effecting Enrolled Children Arrival Procedures Notification of Absence Pick Up Procedures Late Pick Up Persons appearing to be impaired by Drugs and/or Alcohol Emergency/Alternate Pick-up Forms Transportation School Calendar Emergency and Inclement Weather Closing Information Curriculum Information Daily Schedule of Activities Class Assignments Staff to Child Ratios Nap/Rest Time Educational/Personal Care Supplies Needed Birthday and Holiday Celebrations Parent/Teacher Conferences/Communication......

Words: 11162 - Pages: 45

Premium Essay

Handbook

...University Of Phoenix 2012 The Go To Hand Book! Look in here for more info of best practices! Ryan Hesche Supervision and Leadership Demonstrating Communication Skills- Communication skills are very important, written and verbal both are equally important. Below are some well written communications and some poorly written communications. The biggest thing I find is the lack of proper grammar in professional writing. I find myself sometimes struggling with this as I think we all do, and in the world of texting (Your and You’re are the same thing.) However if you write “Your looking great today” should be “You’re looking great today” We all need to proof read what after we write something. Recently my supervisor received a letter from another manager; he was asking for the opportunity for advancement in the company, there were more errors in his writing than there was correct grammar! This looked poorly on the other manager as he was looking to advance within our company, when my supervisor received this, he was astonished to know that this was written by another manager. He talked to that manager and his excuse was I was in a hurry, otherwise known as he did not proof read it. Something like this is the difference of getting promoted and losing your current position! Determining Effective Orientation and Training Methods- In week 5 we put together a training manual of what and how we would train employees. This is the result. Three Day Training......

Words: 2104 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Employee Handbook

...The handbook will address the state and federal laws regarding nondiscrimination and health and safety laws. At the top of this section of the handbook it can be stated that the organization is an equal opportunity employer and is has made a solid commitment to hiring staff for our organization without the regard of religion, age, race, gender, or disability and that we do so by complying with all Federal regulations as well as with state legislation and regulations. Also in this section we will include the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Fair Labor Standards Acts, Family Medical Leave Act, and a section outlining or describing the Occupational and Health Safety Administration and the standards OSHA enforces. In each section we will include a website where more information can be found for each topic. We will describe how the Americans with Disabilities Act ensures that those with a disability have equal rights and opportunity for employment and are not to be discriminated upon applying for employment. In this section we can outline the employers responsibilities regarding this act so that it covers the organization’s as well as the employee’s rights. For example we can add that if the organization has 15 employees or more that they are not to discriminate against an applicant that is qualified for the job they are applying for regardless of their disability. In the section for Equal Employment Opportunity Commission......

Words: 461 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Handbook Questions

...Master of Education Handbook Questions 1. The 14 characteristics that Faulkner University attempts to instill in its students are: a. Developmental knowledge and skill b. Learning environment knowledge and skill c. Learning process knowledge and skill d. Pedagogical content knowledge and skill e. Communication knowledge and skill f. Assessment knowledge and Skill g. Critical Thinking Knowledge and skill h. Reflective and Professional knowledge and skill i. Technological knowledge and skill j. Character knowledge and skill k. Dialogue skill and disposition l. Care skills and Disposition m. Learning potential skill and disposition n. Calling skill and disposition.(pg 11-12) 2. Formal requirements for admission to the Teacher Education Program: o. Submission of Teacher Education Application with attached “Why I want to teach” essay p. Demonstration of a minimum GPA of 3.00 q. A passing score on the appropriate Praxis II content test r. Completion of the five allowed education courses s. SAE dues paid for current school year t. Satisfactory ratings on approved clinical experiences in a variety of settings totaling a minimum of 80 hours u. Submission and approval of electronic Portfolio through LiveText v. Completion of background check and fingerprinting. w. Submission of approved disposition rating......

Words: 524 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Handbook of Od

...5 Four General Strategies for Changing Human Systems ROBERT E. QUINN SCOTT SONENSHEIN I n this chapter we articulate a new general strategy for effecting change in human systems. To do this, we return to the fundamental assumptions of organization development (OD). In examining the early arguments in the field, we identify an essential strategy that has never been made explicit. By developing this strategy, we open avenues for research and provide an action framework that will increase the effectiveness of change agents. FOUNDATIONS OF OD We begin with a review of the seminal paper published in 1969 by Chin and Benne, “General Strategies for Effecting Changes in Human Systems.” In the paper, Chin and Benne outline three general strategies for changing human systems: empirical–rational, power–coercive, and normative–reeducative. The empirical–rational strategy considers people to be rationally self-interested. An organization member adopts a proposed change if the following two conditions are met: The proposed change is rationally justified, and the change agent demonstrates the benefits of the change to the change target. In short, the rational–empirical approach emphasizes that if the target has a justifiable reason to change (i.e., if it is in his or her self-interest), change comes from simply telling the target about the change. Chin and Benne call their second strategy power–coercive. This approach focuses on change efforts in which a more powerful person......

Words: 5570 - Pages: 23

Premium Essay

Handbook for Referencing

...DEPARTMENT of LANGUAGE & COMMUNICATION THE BUSINESS SCHOOL HANDBOOK FOR REFERENCING 1. THE IMPORTANCE OF REFERENCING There are three main reasons why accurate referencing is important: * it provides relevant background information, illustrations of ideas or theories, or evidence for an argument that you are making in your essay or report. Your ideas need to be based on prior reading, and referencing is a way of showing that you have done this and are familiar with the field. * it enables readers to find any source of information mentioned in the text, if they want to follow up on a point or examine a theory more closely. In other words, if you refer to someone's work in an essay or report, you have to give enough information to allow readers to find it for themselves, if they find it interesting or relevant. * it gives due credit to the person(s) from whom you acquired the information. Using those ideas and/or words as if they were your own, or without acknowledging where they came from, is equivalent to 'stealing' someone else's ideas and counts as an academic offence in Britain known as plagiarism. 2. FORMATTING STYLES: HARVARD REFERENCING There are many different formatting styles for referencing, and each journal uses a specific style. So in that sense, there is no single, correct way in which to format your references. Nevertheless, it is......

Words: 3693 - Pages: 15

Premium Essay

Employee Handbook

...Employee Handbook In this Employee Handbook, you will find our policies and procedures that are put in place to benefit both the employer and employee. The employee rules apply to all our employees and must be followed to maintain employment with the company. It will also cover the consequences and procedure that are in place to deal with any violations of the handbook. As with all things, we reserve the right to make changes as we see fit with proper notification to all employees. We may revise, add, or delete as necessary. If you need more information regarding anything in the handbook, please contact your Human Resource Manager. Privacy Rights Addressed Privacy will be honored on both the employer and the employee. All confidential material, such as your personnel file or payroll, will be kept private and only the necessary employees will have access. Any information that is released will be done on a need to know basis only. As an employee, it is your responsibility to maintain the privacy of our clients and any information you may receive throughout the workweek. You will also have information about our daily operations. These also are not to be shared with anyone. Depending on your position with our company, you may receive confidential information regarding other employees that is not to be shared with others. It is of highest importance that privacy is maintained during all aspects of work. Privacy Rights & Privacy Protection ...

Words: 2073 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Oil Handbook

...The Palm Oil Financing Handbook Practical guidance on responsible financing and investing in the palm oil sector © 2008 WWF International. All rights reserved. Any representation in full or in part of this publication must mention the title and credit the above-mentioned publisher as the copyright owner. The authors gratefully acknowledge the assistance of colleagues within WWF and other organizations in the preparation of this document. We would also like to thank Aswin Riva and Kisho Kumar for their technical advice, as well as Joel Posters (ABN Amro), Samantha Lacey (CIS), Maria Anne Van Dijk (Fortis), Simon Harris and Amol Titus (HSBC), Catherine Cassagne (IFC), Leonie Schreve (ING), Aninditta Savitry (Rabobank), Standard Chartered and Teoh Cheng Hai for their invaluable peer review comments on an earlier draft of this document. Design by Nina Narvsten (www.amazingearth.info). Production of this handbook has benefited from technical support by Profundo (profundo@profundo.nl). Profundo is an economic research consultancy specialized in the analysis of financiers, suppliers and clients of companies and policy options to stimulate them to operate in a socially responsible way. This publication also benefits from funding support to Profundo from Doen Foundation ( The Netherlands) This publication is made possible by the generous support of the American people through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The contents are the responsibility of WWF......

Words: 27736 - Pages: 111