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Harlem Renaissance

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Harlem Renaissance was a time of explosive culture and growth in the black community. During this time in the 1920s and 30s, it was not only the birth place of jazz but also we heard voices of the African American Authors who were taken serious by their white connects for the first time in history. It focused on portraying black culture and life in the ghetto. And it gave the African American Culture uniqueness within literature and art.
Harlem Renaissance was an evident racial pride that symbolized the melodic theme of the New Negro. New Negro challenged the penetrating racial discrimination to encourage socialistic help of art and literature.
As to be significant in the Harlem Renaissance the writers used poetry to present the African American experiences. Grabbing the attention between both black and white readers around the world. One Poet that set that bar really was Langston Hughes he was one of the most popular black poets of the Harlem Renaissance. Hughes was great at his job with more diversity in his choice of writings. He had written Plays, Novels, Poems, and Short Stories, Most of his writings were the real situations that really happened in black cultures. Movies were highly looked up upon in the Harlem Renaissance. D.W. Griffith directed “The Birth of a Nation” the film was over African Americans directors who countered negative stereotypes promoted in majority of the mainstream movies. Then released films in The Harlem Renaissance showcased the struggle of the African Americans in the U.S. alone.
Musicians during the Harlem Renaissance developed a style and movement that simply took Americans by storm. Musicians such as Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong have inspired others all over the country. The renaissance itself was not only an observation towards life of Americans that they have a place in society. All of the Musicians shared a common purpose. The purpose was to develop art that reflected upon the African American Community. In which this era was the start that blacks provided themselves with their cultural roots and a promise for a better future.
Emerging at the same time as the renaissance was a new form called jazz. Jazz groups usually were made up of several instruments. Whites were very interested in this form of music. Jazz reflects the black society by adding the growth culture of black people rising out suffering and heading to a good place.
As America moves into a more cultural and diverse era, more people were expanding into more developed areas to branch out and learn more intriguing activities. Harlem Renaissance Was far most to be more of freedom of African Americans soared in art, music, literature, and poetry. The main writers soaking the Harlem Renaissance was the popular was Langston Hughes.
Lance Armstrong was one of the most famous musicians within the Harlem Renaissance. Coming from a poor family in New Orleans, Armstrong was invited in 1922 to move out and head to Chicago, to play for a Creole Jazz Band which made him local. He has to be one of the most appreciated both jazz and African American music even more, because of Armstrong. His Ambition was all focused on the art of his passion of playing Jazz. He will always have a very large imprint within the Harlem Renaissance.
Marcus Garvey was important as being one great Social Activist and Journalist. Garvey caught the attention of White and Black Americans with powerful ideas about being separate. Garvey established the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA). In which it promoted business ownership and encouragement of sense of brotherhood among African Americans.
The Harlem Renaissance is still happening today. I’m not saying literally but it has rolled over into today’s generation. The music that we listen to and the poetry that we are involved in has brought up from the Harlem Renaissance whether one knows it or not. If it was not for the people that came before the people who are still doing it now the arts which includes Literature and music. Harlem is known as a place that was known for poverty, but was a place that eventually turned into something bigger and meaningful. And it uplifted the African American race through are very well upbringing. The Harlem Renaissance refers to the cultural, artistic and social expression in which the New York neighborhood of Harlem between world war I and the 1930s. Throughout the Harlem renaissance, writers and other artists came to Harlem for the opportunity having a fact to express their work of art.
Harlem considered a cultural center, particularly among those who relocated to the area from the south, which was subject to a repressive caste system. The Harlem renaissance happened during the 1920s and 1930s. It was known within the “New Negro Movement”. It was a time when intellectual growth was at the for African American in history. It was a new beginning for blacks and our future. It gave African Americans pride in them. It made them feel like anything and everything was possible. That nothing could stand in their way. The people involved became very important to African American history and black culture. They became very famous. But, that’s not just all of it is much more. The legacy of the Harlem Renaissance opened doors and influenced the generations of African Americans that wrote what followed. In the decades immediately following World War I, Have numbers of blacks that moved to the industrial north from the economy in the south. In the cities, such as Chicago, Washington, D.C. and New York City, the recently moved and found new opportunities, but economic and creating great art. Blacks were encouraged to celebrate their heritage and to become “The New Negro” a term coined in 1925 by sociologist and critic.
The Harlem Renaissance is about what was involved and what the Harlem renaissance was. It is also about there is a lot of dealing with the renaissance. There is a lot of people in it. This was not just on explosion of American History. It was a new start for blacks and our future. It gave Blacks pride in them. Made them feel like everything was possible. That nothing could stop them. Nothing could stand in their way. The people involved became very famous. But, that’s not just all of it. The Harlem Renaissance was prominent in the late 1800s. “African Americans had endured centuries of slavery and the stuggle for abolition” , the Harlem Renaissance was away for African Americans to celebrate for their way out of bondage. The Harlem Renaissance was the African American way to the “promised land” but not the one many had “envisioned.” “In the 1890s, African Americans migrated to the North,” this is known as the Great Migration.
“The Great Migration” was the relocation of African Americans from the South to the North. This migration changed the world tremendously and the life of many African Americans in the generations to come. As these African Americans migrated, “many discovered they had shared common experiences in their past” such as being confined in their ethnicity and their “uncertain present circumstances” such as trying to find a way out of their confined circumstances and to ensure that their lives will be better over time. “Instead of wallowing in self-pity”, they created a culture- “The Harlem Renaissance.” The “Harlem Renaissance” blossomed in the “creative arts, visual arts, musical and theatrical” periods. This era was a booming time for the African American culture. The Harlem Renaissance was the celebration of the deprived time of the African American culture. The Harlem Renaissance had an enormous impact on “black literature and worldwide.” “Harlem attracted a remarkable concentration of intellect and talent and served as the symbolic capital of a cultural awakening.” George Hutchinson as the editor of the article, “Harlem Renaissance” on the website, Encyclopedia Britannica defines the idea of what the Harlem Renaissance was in American culture in the early part of the 20th Century. Hutchinson gives several facts and main ideas about The Harlem Renaissance, one of these facts being that “the Harlem Renaissance “was an African American culture” that happened in the time period largely between “1918-1937.” The article also discusses one of the most important things that happened in the Harlem Renaissance, and this is the African American’s “reconceptualization” of their self-identify “apart from the” negative, prejudicial and “white stereotype” given to them by whites that had “influenced” their ideas about themselves --- influences from their history of slavery in the Colonies and in the forming of Colonial America as a country. According to this article, this negative stereotype that “whites” had given “the Negro” also affected the way African Americans interacted with one another. Hutchinson tells how the “creative arts” like “literature, musicals, theater and visual arts are the cultural influences that helped the “blossoming” of this new African-American self-identify as a valuable and ancient people.
The Harlem Renaissance was a phase of a larger New Negro movement that had emerged in the early 20th century and in some ways ushered in the civil rights movement of the late 1940s and early 1950s. The social foundations of this movement included the Great Migration of African Americans from rural to urban spaces and from South to North; dramatically rising levels of literacy; the creation of national organizations dedicated to pressing African American civil rights, “uplifting” the race, and opening socioeconomic opportunities; and developing race pride, including pan-African sensibilities and programs. This “New Negro Movement” that emerged in the “civil rights movements of the late 1940s and early 1950s.” This was the “social foundations of this movement including the Great Migration of African Americans from rural to urban spaces and from South to North.” Langston Hughes had a great influence on the Harlem Renaissance. Hughes’s poem “The Weary Blues” won first place in the “Opportunity magazine literary competition.” He later “received a scholarship to attend Lincoln University, in Pennsylvania.” While Hughes was “studying at Lincoln”, his “poetry came to the attention of a novelist Carl Van Vechten, he used his connections to help get Hughes’s first book of poetry.” Hughes work was very popular and influential on the black culture. Some poems are depicted from “black themes and heritage.” In 1925, Hughes’s poem “The Weary Blues” won first prize in the Opportunity magazine literary competition, and Hughes also received a scholarship to attend Lincoln University, in Pennsylvania. While studying at Lincoln, Hughes poetry came to the attention of novelist and critic Carl Van Vechten, who used his connections to help get Hughes’s first book of poetry, The Weary Blues, published by Knopf in 1926. The book had popular appeal and established both his poetic style and his commitment to black themes and heritage. Hughes was also among the first to use jazz rhythms and dialect to depict the life of urban blacks in his work. He published a second volume of poetry, Fine Clothes to the Jew, in 1927. “Tin Pan Alley” referred to an actual location where popular music publishers had their offices in New York City—first Union Square, then West 28th Street, and then further uptown. But “Tin Pan Alley” also meant a style of music that tended initially toward ethnic novelty songs and later, in the “classic” period (from the mid-1920s on), toward 32-bar love songs that relied heavily on internal rhymes and punning in the use of language. Such songs fed, and became the basis for, the burgeoning musical revues on Broadway. Tin Pan Alley is the “actual location where popular location publishers had their offices in New York City.” Some are in First Union Square and West 28th Street and then further uptown. Tin Pan Alley meant “a style of music that tended initially toward ethnic novelty songs and later in the “Classic Period.” Most scholars of the blues believe it was born in the Mississippi Delta shortly before 1900. The blues had its roots in other forms of black music that included African rhythms.

Most scholars of the blues believe it was born in the Mississippi Delta shortly before 1900. The blues had its roots in other forms of black music that included African rhythms, field hollers, jump-ups, spirituals, and church music, but it became a distinct form by the turn of the century. It grew out of the hard lives of poor black workers and sharecroppers. J. C. Handy, who would popularize the blues, pointed out, "The blues did not come from books. Suffering and hard luck were the midwives that birthed these songs. The blues were conceived in aching hearts."

“The blues, like spirituals, were prayers. One was praying to God and he other was praying to man." Bessie Smith The “rise of Tin Pan Alley” depended upon the “mass immigration of East European Jews to New York in the early 1880.” African Americans began leaving the South. What we now call Tin Pan Alley depended on a meeting of Jews and African Americans in the modern American city, where the two cultures interacted informally in neighborhoods, music halls and businesses. The “rise of Tin Pan Alley” depended upon the “mass immigration of East European Jews to New York in the early 1880.” African Americans began leaving the South. What we now call Tin Pan Alley depended on a meeting of Jews and African Americans in the modern American city, where the two cultures interacted informally in neighborhoods, music halls and businesses.

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