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Headless Rip Van Winkle

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Submitted By bigpapa243
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Headless Rip Van Winkle
There comes a time when we all know we do something we will regret. You make a decision, and then later on it ends up coming back to haunt you. In the short stories by Washington Irving, both characters Tom and Rip make a decision they regret. The short stories The Devil and Tom Walker (1824) and Rip Van Winkle (1819) are written by Washington Irving. In The Devil and Tom Walker, Tom takes a different route home through a swamp and encounters the devil and later on makes a deal with the devil. In Rip Van Winkle, Rip decides to go into the woods with his dog and meets a group of people who he drinks with; then falls asleep and wakes up 18 years later. What Tom and Rip both failed to realize is that their decisions came with grave consequences in the end. They both ended up in terrible situations that they thought would not happen.
Tom Walker’s outcome was far worse than Rip Van Winkle’s. Tom made a deal with the devil shortly after his wife had died. The devil ended up coming for him years later. The devil put him on a horse and took him back to the swamp to finally kill him (Irving 10-15). Tom failed to realize that his decisions would come with grave consequences in the end. Rip Van winkle set out for the woods with his rifle and dog because he wanted to get away from his home life. When he was out, he encountered a group of inhumane beings and drank liquor with them. When Rip woke up, he then found out that 18 years had passed and most of his family had been dead or gone off somewhere, except for a daughter and his grandchild (Irving 13-23).He was happy he still had family. Although Rip’s outcome was not as bad as Tom’s; they both did not realize that when they made their decision, it would come back and haunt them later. Rip’s decision was running from home and drinking with inhuman beings; and Tom’s decision of making a deal with the…...

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