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Biological and Humanistic Approaches to Personality
Kimberly Jenkins
PSY/250
June 30, 2014
John Muench

Biological and Humanistic Approaches to Personality Introduction
Biological and humanistic concepts differ for various reasons. There are four basic concepts behind humanistic psychology. First, the persons present is the most important part of a person “who they are now”. Second person have to responsibility for all that they do “good or bad. Third all of us hold worth and potential. Last, the achievement of personal growth and understanding is the goal of life. The biological concept focuses on thought rather than emotion. Biological theorists believe that genetic make-up determines a personality. The basic concepts state that even if biology plays no direct role in personality, the way a person looks affects how one sees himself and how others interact with him. This indirect affect determines how a person develops into adulthood. Biological perspectives also teach that intelligence and genes determine a person’s personality. Temperament and mental disorders are also believed to be determined by biology (Myers, 1999, p. 256). The basic concepts state that even if biology plays no direct role in personality, the way a person looks affects how one sees himself and how others interact with him. This indirect affect determines how a person develops into adulthood. Growth and Personality

According to Maslow’s hierarchy of needs are Self-Actualization needs - realizing personal potential, self-fulfillment, seeking personal growth and peak experiences. Esteem needs - achievement, mastery, independence, status, dominance, prestige, self-respect, and respect from others. Social Needs - belongingness, affection and love, - from work group, family, friends, romantic…...

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