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Health Promotion Pamphlet Critique

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Health Promotion Pamphlet Critique

Health Promotion Pamphlet Critique

The function of a health promotion brochure is to present information to the community on different topics with the intention of improving the health and well-being of individuals through the implementation of health education. In order for a brochure to be effective, the message must be clear, precise, and totally understood by the individual. Some health promoting brochures can provide incentives to maintaining wellness promoting behaviors. Brochures outlining strategies for preventing diseases such as diabetes can provide information to attain a stable lifestyle. The information however, has to be properly presented to get those results. According to Jamison (2004) implementation of even one healthy behavior can have an ubiquitous health benefit, it is therefore suggested that suitably formulated health information brochures inform and encourage the adoption of healthy behaviors (p 262). The title of the brochure is Diabetes and it is meant to educate those who want to learn more about the disease.
Source and Topic Diabetes is a major problem in the Unite States. The total prevalence of diabetes in the Unite States, all ages is 18.2 million people which accounts for 6.3% of the population that has diabetes. Of this only 13.0 million has been diagnosis and 5.2 million undiagnosed cases (Center for Disease Control). Diabetes shortens life expectancy by about 13 years and is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, taking about 300,000 lives annually. It drains the United States economy of over $130 billion a year and consumes about one in four Medicare dollars (Preventing diabetes, Part 1: Understanding and diagnosis the disease, 2007, p. 4). The diabetic health information brochure is appropriate for consumers who are...

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