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Heart Disease Among African American Women

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Heart Disease among African American Women
Ciatta Jones, RN
Excelsior College

Abstract
Heart Disease remains the number one killer among women. However, African American women have a higher rate of heart disease than any other ethnic group or demographics and subsequently have an increased mortality rate among other nationalities. They are disproportionately outnumbered when it comes to the obesity rate, stroke and diabetes amongst other groups such as the Caucasians and Asian’s. Contributing factors are decreased awareness and knowledge of heart disease, a low self perception regarding risk factors, ongoing behaviors that are not modified such as smoking, alcoholism, eating fried and salty foods and sometimes the inability to get to medical facilities and clinics. With more education about heart disease and an increased perception of risk, people’s minds will become transformed and will be motivated to modify risk factors related to heart disease. Differences in knowledge and comprehension levels are greater amid those that have a higher educational level. Continual health promotions, fairs, seminars and preventative efforts must continue for us to see positive outcomes associated with a desired behavior change.
Keywords: African American, heart disease, women, risk factors, education

Heart disease among African American Women
The death threat of heart disease is greater than that of AIDS and breast cancer collectively. It is the number one killer of women and also the leading cause of death in the U.S. followed by cancer, accident and stroke. Heart disease is an umbrella term for any disease that affects the heart. Not only is it the number one killer amongst women but is also referred to as the “silent killer” of women because of its insidious onset. Despite the attempts of many organizations like the American Heart Association, Women Heart…...

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