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Heart Dissection

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Heart Dissection

I. Purpose
The purpose of this lab was to practice dissection skills and to further our knowledge of the heart. From this lab we learnt about the parts and functions of the heart. For example, the different chambers, the veins, and the arteries that all run through the heart. Through careful observation we were able to identify all of the main parts of the heart that keep blood pumping through our body and were able to determine the important structures. Because of this lab I can successfully label a diagram and explain the use for each part of the heart.

II. Procedure a. Materials i. Sheep Heart ii. Scalpel iii. Dissection Pan iv. Dissection Pins v. Tweezers vi. Gloves… (If you remember) vii. Camera for Pictures b. Procedure
Because sheep hearts are so cheap and readily available, they are the most common use for this type of experiment. We began the lab by observing the external anatomy. We first observed that the heart did not have a pericardium. The pericardium is the body’s way of protecting the heart and separates it from the rest of the thoracic cavity. If it were present we would have cut it away to reveal the white lumpy tissue. The white lumpy tissue is fat tissue. The bulk of the heart tissue is the reddish brown muscle or myocardium. We placed the heart down showing the ventral side to reveal the following features: Apex, Superior Vena Cava, Inferior Vena Cava, Right Auricle, Right Ventricle, Right and Left Pulmonary Veins, Left Auricle, Left Ventricle, Brachiocephalic Artery, and the Coronary Artery. When we flipped the heart over to view the dorsal side we acknowledged the following: Aorta, Pulmonary Artery, Pulmonary Vein, Left Auricle, Left Ventricle, Coronary Artery, Right ventricle, Inferior Vena Cava, Right Auricle, Superior Vena...

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