Heat Changes Experiment Report

In: Science

Submitted By misschmoopy
Words 384
Pages 2
Aim:
To investigate the correlation between the concentrations a base and enthalpy change in a heat of neutralization reaction.
Variables:
* Independent: mass of baking soda (NaHCO3)
* Dependent: temperature of the product
* Control: concentration of CH3COOH (0.4mol), volume of CH3COOH (100ml), volume of water (10ml)
Theory:
Q = mc T and H = - Q/n
The enthalpy change, H is the amount of heat released or absorbed when a chemical reaction occurs at constant pressure. The heat energy (Q) is measure of the total energy in a substance and does depend on the amount of substance present. Since the value of H depends on the mole (n), and the bigger the mole number the smaller the value of H will be. The neutralization reaction HC2H3O2 + NaHCO3 = CO2 + NaC2H3O2(aq) + H2O(l) releases heat therefore it is an exothermic reaction. The energy of the reactant is greater than the product (Hproduct > Hreactant) This is because there is net bond formation. The products collectively have lower energy than the reactants. Evaporation of the liquid occurs as the carbon dioxide escapes from solution. Evaporation absorbs heat, cooling the liquid. The CO2 gas will cause foam and bubble in this reaction. (CH3COONa) in water (H2O), as the carbon dioxide gas (Co2) escapes.
Hypothesis:
The higher the concentration of baking soda added to the reaction, the smaller the H value will be.
Apparatus:
1. 1.5L of acetic acid
2. 300ml of distilled water
3. 18g of baking soda
4. Beaker glass
5. Thermometer
6. Measuring cylinder
7. Electronic balance
8. Spatula
9.
Method:
1. Put 10ml of acetic acid and 10ml distilled water in measuring cylinder separately.
2. Weigh out 0.5g of baking soda and pour 10ml of distilled water into the beaker glass.
3. Stir gently so that the powders dissolve.
4. Measure the…...

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