Hiding a Disability

In: Social Issues

Submitted By ckendzie
Words 717
Pages 3
Hiding a Disability
Craig Kendzie
ETH/316
January 14, 2014
Tammy Matthews

Hiding a Disability
Many people did not know that our former President Franklin D Roosevelt was paralyzed from the waist down. They believed if the public was aware of this that they would not have voted for him due to this shortcoming. He would wear very long pants and his braces were painted black to help disguise his disability. He would also address the public while seated in his automobile. President Roosevelt physical impairment in no way affected his performance in representing this county. It is a shame that society is judgmental and narrow when it deals with the disabled. Watching this short film opens your eyes on how we may or may not be
The issues of this film are important because they address things that are still around today. They may have improved but, deep down people still have these beliefs and thoughts. There are laws and policies put into place to protect the disabled from being discriminated against. First of all that politics are deceitful. It may have worked to the advantage of the handicapped president, but it was not fair to himself or the public. This has no bearing on how he performed his duties however, it goes to show that trickery has been around for a long time. Another issue this film has shown that having a physical disability can cause prejudice and you may not be afforded the same opportunities as others.
The role in external societal pressures have in influencing organizational ethics are immense and may operate off a false preference. This case in specific shows that having a disability was frowned upon. Was this completely accurate? Could it have been the belief of his political campaigners? It is probably a little of both. His disability would in no way would impair his decision making for the government. Another factor could be the perception…...

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