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Hip Hop and Behavior in Black America

In: Social Issues

Submitted By collegestudent92
Words 4412
Pages 18
Research Evaluation: The Behavior of African American People through Hip Hop Music
Papi Jean
Florida Memorial University

Introduction
The Growth of Hip Hop in America
As hip hop continues to grow into a major aspect of the modern African American culture, the studies intend to distinguish the mass outlook of black people in America. It is incredible that this single genre of music has transformed into a vital communication mechanism for an entire race and may even become larger in future generations of African American people. The other races, in America, have gotten an idea of African Americans through the controversial rap music in which black people use to communicate with each other, and outsiders; the non-blacks. The study revolves mainly around the attitudes which have deemed as common in the black culture; rap music has always been open for interpretation which can lead to danger. The music has become so popular and influential to the youth that many crimes have been linked to the music which fuels an efficient form controversy in America. Do people receive the negative aspects of rap more than the positive aspects? If so, then why? Also, why are the positive approaches of hip hop not made commercial rather than the sex, drugs, and violence? There is belief that the music has a great influence on how the other races in America view the black culture. It is not certain whether rap music is more negative than positive, but it is obviously a notorious topic for many reasons, no matter the race. The studies propose that the behavior of blacks in America is greatly influenced by hip hop music that can easily be perceived in forms of criminal activity, sex, greed, and ignorance. This is also a problem that can be observed in any environment, such as a public schoolhouse where many young blacks are present. It may be a good idea to observe the actions and the...

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