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Hip Hop and Women

In: Film and Music

Submitted By kphan3
Words 2844
Pages 12
Kim Phan
10/23/2015
Arts 152
Final Research Paper
Capitalism and Women’s Role in Modern Hip Hop Music has always had a huge impact on society; it serves as a means of expression and as a way of communicating and connecting with others. While there are positive aspects to music as it uplifts society during times of hardship it also serves as a means of reinforcing gender norms as well as upholding capitalist ideals. Since its inception, hip hop has remained one of the most popular genres with today’s youth, but it is clear that women play a different role in the genre than men. Through a study of several hip hop and rap songs it becomes apparent that hip hop glamorizes brand names, “fast money”, and women. When women are objectified they are no longer encouraged to amass wealth, instead they are encouraged to simply be with men who have money. By reviewing popular song lyrics of famous hip hop such as Iggy Azalea’s, “I’m so Fancy” and Kanye’s “Mercy”, it is clear that there is a common theme of the obsession of wealth and beautiful women. Hip hop often dehumanizes women as they are perceived as plentiful and a luxury “item”. The modern woman, and women of the working class have no representation in hip hop. Women are further oppressed through hip hop as the average life style of those who cannot afford to spend lavishly are often left out and depicted as envious. Understanding how hip hop and capitalism is related is important to understanding why modern women are oppressed through this genre of music. Consumerism plays a huge part in how lyrics are written in hip hop music culture as hip hop is commonly used by the media to exploit a “recession free” lifestyle. In Steve Yate’s article, “The Sound of Capitalism”. in Project Magazine, Yates describes how we as a nation buy into rap and hip hop as it is not just music it is a way of living. Yates criticizes…...

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