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Hmong Culture Research Paper

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In a short biography about the Hmong culture, they originally dominated the country of China; however, they were overtaken by other Asian groups (Split Horn). Some Hmong people were enslaved, while majority of the Hmong individuals scattered throughout the world. Hmong families and relatives strayed away from populated areas, and decided to escape to Thailand. With the separation of the Hmong population, Hmong relatives mainly mobilized to Laos or deep into the mountains in Thailand. The estimated Hmong population during that time was 300,000 to 400,000 people (Split Horn). When the Vietnam War began, several Hmong people decided to find different locations to live in, while other Hmong individuals contributed to fight along with the United …show more content…
Hmong people were provided social security numbers that would make them identifiable towards the United States government, which was the beginning for the Hmong community to having real documentation of their existence. During their immigration to America, they chose to live the only way they knew how to, which was to continue living in rural areas that had the least signs of conflict, and exposure to danger. Similar to the racism viewed towards African Americans, Hmong people experienced the same kind of treatment. Coincidently, this led many Hmong communities to be in the same locations that consisted of mostly African Americans as well. When the Hmong population migrated to the United States, their main priority was to adapt and survive. Several Hmong immigrants began infiltrating small jobs that would help them feed their families. Starting from digging up worms to complex labor work, Hmong people continued to perform these difficult occupations to support themselves and their children. If a business was in search of a worker, then these Hmong individuals would be willing to take the job as long as they could earn some money.
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