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Homeostasis Flight or Fight

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By LILLYROSE28
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FIGHT OR FLIGHT EXAMPLES:
Situation 1: You walk into class a few moments late, only to find everyone putting books and notes away- preparing for a test you did not realise had been scheduled for today. Your heart seems to stop, your mouth is dry, your knees feel weak and you momentarily consider hurrying back out the door. Your life is not really in danger, and running away will not solve your problem—so why should you feel a physical urge to escape?
Situation 2: At a meeting for which you have thoroughly prepared, the boss criticises you and accuses you of failing to attend to tasks that were, in reality, someone else’s responsibility. As all eyes turn on you, you feel your face getting hot, your jaw tightening, and your fist clenching. You would not shout or hit anyone—doing so would only make things worse. But you feel like shouting or striking out.
These two scenarios illustrate the two poles of the fight-or-flight response, a sequence of internal processes that prepares the aroused organism for struggle or escape. It is triggered when we interpret a situation as threatening. The resulting response depends on how the organism has learned to deal with threat, as well as on an innate fight-or-flight “program” built into the brain.

Situation 1: You walk into class a few moments late, only to find everyone putting books and notes away- preparing for a test you did not realise had been scheduled for today. Your heart seems to stop, your mouth is dry, your knees feel weak and you momentarily consider hurrying back out the door. Your life is not really in danger, and running away will not solve your problem—so why should you feel a physical urge to escape?
Situation 2: At a meeting for which you have thoroughly prepared, the boss criticises you and accuses you of failing to attend to tasks that were, in reality, someone else’s responsibility. As all eyes turn on you, you feel your face getting hot, your jaw tightening, and your fist clenching. You would not shout or hit anyone—doing so would only make things worse. But you feel like shouting or striking out.
These two scenarios illustrate the two poles of the fight-or-flight response, a sequence of internal processes that prepares the aroused organism for struggle or escape. It is triggered when we interpret a situation as threatening. The resulting response depends on how the organism has learned to deal with threat, as well as on an innate fight-or-flight “program” built into the brain.

FIGHT OR FLIGHT BY BEN MARTIN PSY.D http://psychcentral.com/lib/fight-or-flight/
Diagram showing the different stages that take place on the body when flight or fight takes place.
HOW FEAR WORKS BY JULIA LAYTON: http://science.howstuffworks.com/life/inside-the-mind/emotions/fear2.htm

Diagram showing the different stages that take place on the body when flight or fight takes place.
HOW FEAR WORKS BY JULIA LAYTON: http://science.howstuffworks.com/life/inside-the-mind/emotions/fear2.htm

Diagram showing the effects on the body when stress hormones are released. http://www.s-cool.co.uk/a-level/psychology/stress/revise-it/what-is-stress Diagram showing the effects on the body when stress hormones are released. http://www.s-cool.co.uk/a-level/psychology/stress/revise-it/what-is-stress The sudden flood of epinephrine, norepinephrine and other hormones causes changes in the body that include: * heart rate and blood pressure increase * pupils dilate to take in as much light as possible * veins in skin constrict to send more blood to major muscle groups (responsible for the "chill" sometimes associated with fear -- less blood in the skin to keep it warm) * blood-glucose level increases * muscles tense up, energized by adrenaline and glucose (responsible for goose bumps -- when tiny muscles attached to each hair on surface of skin tense up, the hairs are forced upright, pulling skin with them) * smooth muscle relaxes in order to allow more oxygen into the lungs * nonessential systems (like digestion and immune system) shut down to allow more energy for emergency functions * trouble focusing on small tasks (brain is directed to focus only on big picture in order to determine where threat is coming from).

The sudden flood of epinephrine, norepinephrine and other hormones causes changes in the body that include: * heart rate and blood pressure increase * pupils dilate to take in as much light as possible * veins in skin constrict to send more blood to major muscle groups (responsible for the "chill" sometimes associated with fear -- less blood in the skin to keep it warm) * blood-glucose level increases * muscles tense up, energized by adrenaline and glucose (responsible for goose bumps -- when tiny muscles attached to each hair on surface of skin tense up, the hairs are forced upright, pulling skin with them) * smooth muscle relaxes in order to allow more oxygen into the lungs * nonessential systems (like digestion and immune system) shut down to allow more energy for emergency functions * trouble focusing on small tasks (brain is directed to focus only on big picture in order to determine where threat is coming from).

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