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Homework #2 Implicit Association Test

In: Business and Management

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Florida International University
MAR 4503 Consumer Behavior
Fall 2015, Section U01
Dr. Jayati Sinha

Homework #2
Implicit Association Test

October 12, 2015
(1) Describe your experience doing the demo test. What did you expect would happen? Did the results surprise you? Do you think the results are a valid measure of your implicit attitudes? Why or why not? In your answer, be sure to consider the issues raised in the FAQ page.

I believe that in the domain of intergroup discrimination like race, age, and sexual orientation the Implicit Association Test does better than self-report at predicting behavior. I also understand that I may not say what's on my mind either because I am unwilling or because I am unable to do so. The unwilling-unable distinction is like the difference between purposely hiding something from others and unconsciously hiding something from myself. The Implicit Association Test makes it possible for me to penetrate both of these types of hiding. The Implicit Association Test measures implicit attitudes and beliefs that we are either unwilling or unable to report.

(2) How could you use this technique to test consumer attitudes towards any brands? Would you expect the results to differ from explicit measures of attitudes? Why or why not?

-Tapping consumer insights in such a way more appropriately captures the richness of consumers' perceptions, feelings, and attitudes toward a brand.

-Allows for indirect measurement of attitudes on multiple dimensions than on a single evaluative dimension only.

-Providing strong evidence for its reliability, validity, and sensitivity.

-Add up to a more abstract overall attitude.

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