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How Did Edgar Allan Poe Use Romanticism

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How did Edgar Allan Poe use romanticism in his stories? Edgar Allan Poe one of America’s literary geniuses had a very unusual writing style. His writing typically consisted of dark, dreary, and horrific stories. Throughout all of Poe’s stories he tends to have death, insanity, and unnamed males. One example is “The Raven” in this story a man is nearly asleep when he hears tapping on his door when he checks to see who it could be all he finds is darkness. He hears something whisper “Lenore” so he shuts the door thinking he is just hearing things. He opens the door once more to finds a raven flying in. He try’s making conversation with the raven but all the raven can say is “Nevermore”(Poe, 270). He even asks if he will get to see his deceased...

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