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How Global Brands Compete

In: Business and Management

Submitted By c23ivy
Words 519
Pages 3
Courtney Ivy
Dr. Stanford A. Westjohn
MKTG 3140-001
25 March 2013
“How Global Brands Compete” Article In this article “How Global Brands Compete,” the author discusses the influence of global brands and non-global brands on consumer purchases. The author also expresses the idea of products and services in which Theodore Levitt perceived the global market. As the economy continues to integrate, global branding seemed to decrease. Consumers in most of the world countries have trouble relating to the generic products and communications that resulted from companies’ least-common-denominator thinking. They also completed research to determine the brands and their impact on consumers in different countries. For example, the two-stage research they created in 2002. They conducted research in 41 countries and identified characteristics of consumers that associate themselves with global brands. They also surveyed 1,800 people in 12 nations to determine the importance of consumers purchasing products. In “How Global Brands Compete”, the author suggests the characteristics that consumers search for with global brands. The three characteristics that were provided were quality signal, global myth, and social responsibility. Quality signal is very important in which consumer’s judge their decisions based on reasonable prices. Quality signal makes up for 44% of the brand preferences. Global myth suggests the symbols of the global brands. “Global brands make us feel like the citizens of the world, and… they somehow give us and identity” is a quote from the article that explains consumers are interested in brand identity. Social responsibility is the last characteristic which is probably the most important in which consumers are interested in the society’s well-being. In regards to social responsibility, I believe it is fair that global brands are held to a higher standard...

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