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How Has Feminism Attempted to Achieve Women’s Liberation, and Has the Battle Been Won?

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How has feminism attempted to achieve women’s liberation, and has the battle been won?

This essay aims to outline how feminism has and continues its attempt to achieve women’s liberation.This essay will reflect the current situation in Europe. The essay begins by describing the first and second wave of feminism, providing an overview of the ideas of some important feminist thinkers and activists. It then introduces the third wave, modern feminism and concludes with some remarks regarding the development of feminism insofar as it affects modern organizations willing to tackle gender inequality.
The concept defined as the ‘first wave of feminism’ finds it origins in the mid-nineteenth century, with the ‘suffragettes’—as those pioneers were called—and their struggle to achieve equal political rights. These women’s central aim was to obtain the right to vote, even if that meant they had to protest through various hunger strikes, as they did in London. The ‘second wave of feminism’ focused on ending all forms of sexism, and it fought both psychological and sexual oppression towards women. Among others, Betty Friedan realized that women felt frustrated due to the oppression that came from their perceived role in society, namely that of staying at home. The patriarchal culture started to be criticized by many radical feminists. This second wave was very marked by Simone De Beauvoir and her work, The Second Sex. She believed “one is not born a woman, one becomes one”. Eva Figes wrote about how patriarchal values influence the ethical, philosophical, religious and cultural sides of society. Germain Greer pointed out how women are discriminated sexually and how they are promoted as objects for men. Kate Millett argued that patriarchy is present in our history and in order to fight it, people have to become more conscious of this unfair subjugation. The second wave was a...

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