How Language Abilities and Deficiencies Impact Literacy Development

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How Language Abilities and Deficiencies Impact Literacy Development
Ashanti Gordon
Grand Canyon University: ECH 515
December 12, 2012


How Language Abilities and Deficiencies Impact Literacy Development
Multnomah County had a survey done for kindergarten teachers. The results suggested that 19.4% of their students were not headed toward literacy success, due to a lack of necessary language and pre-reading skills. There is a 90% probability of a child that is a poor reader in first grade, still being a poor reader three years later, in fourth grade (http://www.co.marion.or.us). As Early Childhood Educators, we must help our students.
Creating literacy rich environments for our students will assist them in the literacy process. Early language abilities make a positive impact on literacy development. Language and literacy both have many definitions. This paper will refer to the following interpretations. Language is a method used to communicate. This may be in written or verbal words that are routinely arranged. Literacy is simply the ability to read and write (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary). This paper will discuss language as it relate to the development of literacy.
Language in Literacy
During the first few years of life, language and literacy development begins. It is linked to our first encounter with books and stories. It is linked to the “baby talk” from our caregivers and the noises that a babies makes in return. Language is learned naturally from the child’s parents and teachers. Soon after birth the baby starts to make cooing sounds. If these sounds are properly supported, the baby starts to babble. This processes continues until the child can immolate adults and comprehend the language (Otto, 2008).
Many children have interaction with literacy material through adults. This may consist of simple things such as…...

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