How to Wrie a Paper

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Personal Responsibility in Education

Angela M. Roberson

Foundations for General Education/GEN200

Professor Sundra Kincy

August 21, 2014

Personal Responsibility and Education

Personal Responsibility can be defined as the act of being held accountable or taking ownership of one’s actions. It can also relate to the freedom and the power to create what happens in your life. It’s your life and you must take charge of it.
In this paper I will discuss personal responsibility and how it related to your educational goals. I will give examples of ways to take responsibility of your educational endeavors and how to implement them into your everyday life. There will be a discussion on the benefits as well as the disadvantages of taking personal responsibility of your education. I. Deciding to pursue higher education is a big decision and it has responsibilities along with it. A. You must have a plan. B. Long and short term goals. II. You must decide how you are going to pay for school. A. Scholarships and Financial Aid. B. Tuition Reimbursement. III. Lifestyle changes are very necessary when embarking on educational advancements. A. Time Management B. Maintaining a schedule. C. Balancing family time. D. Making a calendar. IV. Higher education has its advantages.
A Higher pay C. Career advancements D. Better lifestyle. V. Disadvantages A. Less time for extracurricular activities B. Less time for friends and family
In conclusion there are a lot of Personal Responsibilities that go along with pursuing higher education. Your success depends on you and the responsibilities you must take to reach your educational…...

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