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Human Anatomy

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Term Definition Use the term in a sentence as it applies to the health care industry.
Digestive System Digestive system refers to the group of organs that break down food and absorb the nutrients used by the body for fuel and to excrete waste products. Smokeless tobacco products allow tobacco to be absorbed by the digestive system or thorough mucous membranes.

Obesity Obesity is the condition of being more overweight than what is considered average or healthy. Researchers have identified an enzyme that could hold the key to reducing obesity.
Circulatory System Circulatory system refers to the system that moves blood, oxygen and nutrients through the body. Quitting smoking significantly lowers the risk of problems with the heart and the circulatory system.
Hypertension Hypertension also known as high blood pressure is when the blood pressure is 140/90 mmHg (millimeters of mercury) or above most of the time. Pulmonary hypertension refers to high blood pressure in the arteries taking blood from the heart to the lungs.
Immune System Immune system refers to the body’s defense against infectious organism. Scientist have been working for years to find ways to boost the immune systems ability to fight cancer.
Cardiac Disease Cardiac disease also known as heart disease refers to disease concerning the heart. Exercise has been shown to help the heart, whereas a lazy lifestyle can be a major risk factor for cardiac disease.
Respiratory System Respiratory system refers to the system by which oxygen is taken into the body and exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide takes place. Asthma is a disease of the respiratory system, which causes swelling and narrowing of the airways.
Nervous System Nervous system refers to the system of nerves in our body that sends messages for controlling movements and feelings between the brain and other body parts. Parkinson’s disease is a…...

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