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Human Morality

In: English and Literature

Submitted By AmandaCotto
Words 1918
Pages 8
Testing human morality.

What certain actions do humans take when the world comes to an end? Would someone be able to make the right decision for human survival? Would they be able to look away from morality and fulfill the duties needed to recreate a new world? Trying to figure out what steps an individual would take when placed in an apocalyptic situation is hard because of something that is very subjective, morality. Though morals do vary from person to person and society to society there are many universal moral beliefs that are based strictly on human emotions. Morality is what helps individuals make sense of their gut feelings. “After the plague” a short story written by T. Coraghessan Boyle has placed Jed the main character, in an apocalyptic situation that challenges his morals in more ways than one. The author Boyle, sets up a scenario that causes Jed to question his morality, that being said I will look at how Jed overcomes and adapts to the coming challenges after an apocalypse and how morality plays a part in his transformation from the old world to the new. To many the word morality means the definition of right and wrong, to others it is explained as the social norm set by a society. Jed is put into a situation dealing with the end of the world, as he isolates himself he realizes that things will have to change. There will no longer be phone calls to friends or families and he will be alone to figure out how to deal with the issue at hand. The first test of morality for Jed was when he went out to the fish fry and saw the man beneath the deck. Should he help him, or should he just go along and act as if he didn’t realize there was someone there. “What did I do?...Nothing. I don’t care, I was terrified--who wouldn’t be..”(Boyle) This shows that Jed considered helping out the man which in the old world would be the “right” thing to do. Now that the…...

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