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Human Society

In: Historical Events

Submitted By mese1031
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* What forces contributed to the cultural makeup of early civilizations? Religion and beliefs play a main role in the cultural make up because of the simple fact that everyone has their own way of living. Even though there are many different beliefs they all can come together and agree on what they feel is right. Another force is geography for the simple fact of trade meaning what we have to give and what we can get from others.

* What social issues arose because of this cultural makeup? Some issues that arose were war, and beliefs. War started because different country’s felt the need to take rather than to work together. Beliefs were an issue because everyone worshiped a different God and had different ways that they believed we should live.

* What were the main cultural influences on early civilizations? The main influences were spiritual/religious beliefs, also ritual behaviors. Most people felt like if you weren’t living under the same religion as them then your different from them. They separated themselves from those who don’t share the same belief. Ritual behavior plays a big role because most cultures practice different religions and always the way they live life. They believed in a lot of what to do and what not to do.

* From your perspective what are the pros and cons of revisionist history? Explain your response. The pros of revisionist is that you will get another view of past history meaning even though we have proof that those events did take place you can still research to find more details about what really happened. The con is that if people revisit the events that had happened in history it can cause a lot of arguments and confusion meaning we will all then be questioning the information that was given to...

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