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Humanistic Approach in Psychology

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By vivigooli
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Explain the role of "self-concept" in Rogers' theory of personality. Rogers’ idea of self-concept falls under the umbrella of humanistic approach to personality. The humanistic approach focuses on the idea that the human entity has potential for growth. All humans are born as “good” people and growth in the human condition is imperative to this truth. The self is constantly growing and building upon itself. (Carver & Scheier, 2012) An actualized person is one who lives up to their optimum potential. They are “congruent”, which means that they are in balance with themselves. According to Rogers’, this balance is struck between your current self and the person you want to become, and a person has a sort of intuition within themselves called an “organismic valuing process” which will let you know if you are going in the right direction in meeting congruency. Self-concept is defined as” a set of qualities a person views as being part of himself of herself” (Carver & Scheier, 2012). Two sources that effect a person’s self-concept are childhood experiences and the way they believe others perceive them. This is the existential and categorical selves. The existential belief means that a person is a sole entity and is responsible for their own path in life based on the values that they adopt in order to be the most honest versions of themselves. The categorical self is when a person is aware of the characteristics that make them an individual that others may notice about them (McLeod, Self-Concept, 2008) . Each person’s self-concept differs on an individual basis, but there are three general concepts that make up self-concept. These are self-worth, self-image, and the ideal self (McLeod, Carl Rogers, 2007). When all of these are in balance, they make up a congruent, self-actualized person. The way I see the self-concept is sort of like the filter of...

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