Premium Essay

A Humanistic Approach to Working with a Terminally Ill Patient

In: Psychology

Submitted By blaine
Words 1008
Pages 5
A Humanistic Approach to Working with a Terminally Ill Patient “Humanistic psychology . . . emphasizes the independent dignity and worth of human beings and their conscious capacity to develop personal competence and self respect” (Humanistic Psychology Overview, 2001). This view of humanistic psychology shows why a humanistic approach is valuable and effective when working with patients who have a terminal illness, such as cancer. This paper will provide an example of a humanistic approach by a medical professional in providing care to a terminally ill patient. This paper will also provide a reflection of my feelings on the approach, my thoughts on how I would prefer a human service worker to work with me in such an instance, and discuss how unconditional positive regard would be presented under these circumstances. The following example is from Jill Preston’s article in the Journal of Community Nursing, Using Reflective Practice in Palliative Care (2001). Brenda is a patient who was diagnosed with breast cancer and was treated with a mastectomy and radiotherapy. Three years later, Brenda presented back pains to her physician. It was discovered that Brenda had a metastatic tumor on her spine, a terminal condition. Jill Preston was a nurse from the district nursing service who provided Brenda with care. Jill had only visited Brenda three times in the past two months. During the next visit, Jill was shocked to find Brenda looking so pale. Jill greeted Brenda, who smiled. Jill then sat on the bed and had passive conversation about the weather and the children where Brenda had taught. The two women then spoke of treatments to alleviate pain after Jill asked questions regarding Brenda’s illness and current symptoms. Jill then posed questions to Brenda about the ability to perform personal hygiene and dressing. Brenda replied that things were becoming more...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

A Humanistic Approach to Working with a Terminally Ill Patient

...Skip to Navigation Skip to Content TermPaperWarehouse.com - Free Term Papers, Essays and Research DocumentsThe Research Paper Factory Join Search Browse Saved Papers Search A Humanistic Approach To Working With A Terminally Ill Patient In: Psychology A Humanistic Approach To Working With A Terminally Ill Patient A Humanistic Approach to Working with a Terminally Ill Patient “Humanistic psychology . . . emphasizes the independent dignity and worth of human beings and their conscious capacity to develop personal competence and self respect” (Humanistic Psychology Overview, 2001). This view of humanistic psychology shows why a humanistic approach is valuable and effective when working with patients who have a terminal illness, such as cancer. This paper will provide an example of a humanistic approach by a medical professional in providing care to a terminally ill patient. This paper will also provide a reflection of my feelings on the approach, my thoughts on how I would prefer a human service worker to work with me in such an instance, and discuss how unconditional positive regard would be presented under these circumstances. The following example is from Jill Preston’s article in the Journal of Community Nursing, Using Reflective Practice in Palliative Care (2001). Brenda is a patient who was diagnosed with breast cancer and was treated with a mastectomy and radiotherapy. Three years later, Brenda presented back pains to her physician. It was discovered......

Words: 530 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Humanistic Approach to Working with a Terminally Ill

...A Humanistic Approach to Working with a Terminally Ill Patient “Humanistic psychology . . . emphasizes the independent dignity and worth of human beings and their conscious capacity to develop personal competence and self respect” (Humanistic Psychology Overview, 2001). This view of humanistic psychology shows why a humanistic approach is valuable and effective when working with patients who have a terminal illness, such as cancer. This paper will provide an example of a humanistic approach by a medical professional in providing care to a terminally ill patient. This paper will also provide a reflection of my feelings on the approach, my thoughts on how I would prefer a human service worker to work with me in such an instance, and discuss how unconditional positive regard would be presented under these circumstances. The following example is from Jill Preston’s article in the Journal of Community Nursing, Using Reflective Practice in Palliative Care (2001). Brenda is a patient who was diagnosed with breast cancer and was treated with a mastectomy and radiotherapy. Three years later, Brenda presented back pains to her physician. It was discovered that Brenda had a metastatic tumor on her spine, a terminal condition. Jill Preston was a nurse from the district nursing service who provided Brenda with care. Jill had only visited Brenda three times in the past two months. During the next visit, Jill was shocked to find Brenda looking so pale. Jill greeted Brenda, who smiled.......

Words: 320 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Cognitive Psych

...Women in Psychology Introduction Before recent times, many doctors, or physicians did not want to treat people with terminal illnesses. People with terminal illnesses were often considered as a humiliation to doctors or physicians, as the doctors and physicians were frequently thought of as failures because they could not treat or cure those individuals with life-threatening illnesses. Many times the doctors or physicians justification as to why patients with incurable illnesses were dying was that there was nothing more that could be done, and that there were countless demands that required the doctors or physicians time. The doctor’s unsympathetic and heartless ways towards the terminally ill was ostracized by a doctor from Switzerland by the name of Elizabeth Kubler-Ross. Thus, she decided to spend time with the patients who were terminally ill to both comfort and study them. This paper will discuss the background of Elizabeth-Kubler-Ross, her theoretical perspective as well as her contributions to the field of psychology. (Chapman, A, 2006). Background Elizabeth Kubler-Ross was born in Zurich, Switzerland, on the 8th day of July in 1926. She was a sister of triplets and a sister to a brother. Elizabeth desperately searched for uniqueness. It was hard enough being a triplet but having a sister who looked exactly the same as her was taking an even bigger toll on her. Since then need to be unique was so bothersome for Elizabeth she would often escape to one of......

Words: 1514 - Pages: 7

Free Essay

The Role of the Carer in a Health Care Settings

...Writing Assignment 1.2 Daniela Balint The Role of the Carer in Health Care Settings The role of a health care worker is to provide a safe environment for clients while meeting their medical and emotional needs. Care assistants provide basic personal care, social care and emotional support to elderly people who need help with day-to-day tasks. Care assistants may work in hospitals, day centres and residential homes for the elderly. Carers must meet the holistic care needs of the client, including: physical, psychological, social, emotional and safety needs. Maslow's hierarchy of needs is a theory of motivation and personality developed by the psychologist Abraham H. Maslow (1908-1970). Maslow's hierarchy (1954) explains human behaviour in terms of basic requirements for survival and growth. The needs hierarchy provides a useful framework for understanding clients, and this framework has been incorporated into several important theories of medical and nursing care. The most basic physical requirements, such as food, water, or oxygen, constitute the lowest level of the need hierarchy. These needs must be satisfied before other, higher needs become important to individuals. When these needs are unmet, human beings will focus on satisfying them and will ignore higher needs. Responsibility of the carer to meet the physical needs: assisting residents with their hygiene needs, pressure area care, helping at meal times ensure dietary needs are adhered to, the mobilisation......

Words: 1970 - Pages: 8

Premium Essay

Jean Watson

...Institute, a non-profit organization developed to help spread her nursing theory and ideas. Dr. Jean Watson goal is to have nurses come together, regardless of specialty, and share a common definition that embraces science and philosophical perspective. The common goal has become known as caring-healing consciousness. Watson begins her theory by identifying 10 carative factors of care. Theory Concepts Watson bases her theory of nursing on 10 carative factors: 1. Formation of humanistic-altruistic systems of values: This begins in early development and is molded by life experiences, exposure, learning, and culture. 2. Development of faith and hope: The belief in spiritual being can assist in the healing process. The nurse can be authentic in enabling a patient to become more aware of his deep belief systems. 3. Sensitivity to self and others: The nurse is to be sensitive to others in a nurturing, healing way to facilitate healing and promote spirituality. Listening and understanding how the patient is feeling and...

Words: 2483 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Nursing Critical Essay

...respect of the Waterlow Pressure Damage Assessment (1985), pressure sores, nutritional screening and delegation. Other issues considered will be communication, partnership working, the therapeutic relationship, and the nurse as an agent of change. Findings will be supported by literature. Identifying factors have been changed to respect patient confidentiality. Mary had no previous psychiatric history. She was eighty-four and lived in residential accommodation. She had two adult daughters who were unable to attend Mary’s admission. Prior to admission Mary’s behaviour had changed over several weeks and she had been refusing to get out of bed during the day. During admission she showed occasional signs of confusion but was able to give consent. Physically, Mary was in a wheelchair, had a history of falls, pressure damage, skin flaps. and needed full assistance with mobility. My mentor facilitated her admission assessment. I observed this in preparation of undertaking future ones myself whilst under supervision. From a management perspective my mentor who was the senior nurse needed to consider who would be left on the ward whilst he and I did the admission. He needed to consider risk management issues and ensure that there would be a safe and effective level of staffing and skills mix to care for the other patients on the ward and to deal with the daily ward issues. (Risk Management Strategy LPT 2003) Care pathways concentrate on the management...

Words: 5656 - Pages: 23

Premium Essay

Different Between Parental Involvement and Counseling

...1 An introduction to counselling Introduction Stories of counselling Paula’s story: coming to terms with trauma Myra’s story: being depressed Matthew’s story: everything is getting on top of me Laura’s story: finding the right counsellor What is counselling? Defining counselling The relationship between counselling and psychotherapy Counselling and other helping professions The diversity of theory and practice in counselling The aims of counselling Counselling as an interdisciplinary area of study A user-centred definition of counselling Conclusions Chapter summary Topics for reflection and discussion Key terms and concepts Suggested further reading Introduction Counselling is a wonderful twentieth-century invention. We live in a complex, busy, changing world. In this world, there are many different types of experience that are difficult for people to cope with. Most of the time, we get on with life, but sometimes we are stopped in our tracks by an event or situation that we do not, at that moment, have the resources to sort out. Most of the time, we find ways of dealing with such problems in living by talking to family, friends, neighbours, priests or our family doctor. But occasionally their advice is not sufficient, or we are too embarrassed or ashamed to tell them what is bothering us, or we just don’t have an appropriate 2 An introduction to counselling person to turn to. Counselling is a really useful option at these moments. In most places, counselling is available......

Words: 8315 - Pages: 34

Premium Essay

Josh

...Real Essays From Stanford Medical Students Comments Regarding Plagiarism The essays contained within this document were written by current Stanford medical students and have been carefully read and reviewed by file reviewers, interviewers, and admissions staff and officers at Stanford Medical School as well as dozens of other medical schools across the country. We must emphasize that you need to be honest in writing your personal statements. If you borrow material or use quotes from other sources, make sure to credit them appropriately. Not giving credit where it is due is not only disastrous to your essay, but it is also illegal. Admissions officers read hundreds, and even thousands of personal statements each year, and have developed a fine tune sense for detecting plagiarism as well as remembering the essays they’ve read. You owe it to yourself to be hones, open, and sincere in writing your personal essay as it is a reflection of yourself and what is important in your life and your decision to pursue a career in medicine. Stanford Essays The following essays were written by real Stanford medical students in preparing their applications. We suggest that you read through all of the essays to get a diverse view of the types of themes and styles which have been successfully used for personal statements. Each personal statement is exactly that, personal. No one format or style will work for everyone. However, there are structures and themes which are common......

Words: 13099 - Pages: 53

Free Essay

Mgmt

...BECOME THE BEST YOU POSSIBLE: THE PURSUIT OF MEDICINE “The art of healing comes from nature, not from the physician. Therefore the physician must start from nature, with an open mind….” - Paracelsus By Dan Hong FCIQ Collins W04 Assignment due Tuesday 4/26/2016 The Pursuit of Medicine: Table of Contents Introduction to myself……………………………………………………..3 Career Profile………………………………………………………………..4 Anthropology ………………………………………………………………..7 Sociology………………………………………………………………………..13 Psychology…………………………………………………………………….16 Political Science…………………………………………………………….20 Economics……………………………………………………………………….26 History……………………………………………………………………………32 Philosophy………………………………………………………………………38 Conclusion………………………………………………………………………..43 Bibliography/works cited…………………………………………………..45 The Start of a Journey: Introduction of myself If there’s a will, there’s a way. And if there is a way, Dan Hong has the will. Ever since I was born, I was curious about the world. I always said yes to trying new foods, taking mental and physical risks, and learning new skills when possible. I was born and raised in Queens, New York where I hustled on the daily; interacted with people of all kinds and developed a New Yorker mentality of “time is money” and acquired a taste for Italian, Korean, and Indian food. Then, I moved to the Great Neck bubble where I felt as if my development was being stagnated because of the lack of diversity and opportunities. But that didn’t stop me—I traveled to......

Words: 13439 - Pages: 54

Premium Essay

Ethics

...CHAPTER 1 WHAT IS ETHICS?* Stories about “unethical” behavior in business abound. The recent scandals permeating the financial services, savings and loan, and other industries have caused a growing concern about ethics in the workplace. Success often appears to be measured in only dollars. The claim that “greed is good” seems to reflect the behavior of many people in our society. Indeed, the desire to possess more and more seems pervasive—and business, like other institutions, reflects the values, beliefs, and personal goals of our society. Time, Newsweek, the Wall Street Journal, and countless other magazines and newspapers have called attention to unethical practices, bemoaning the “sleaze, scandals, and hypocrisy”1 undermining our moral bearings. In short, there is a great deal of concern about ethics in general, and business ethics in particular. This reading will examine what ethics is and how people decide what is “right” and “wrong.” The word ethics has a number of meanings. Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary gives several definitions of ethics, including: ● the discipline dealing with what is good and bad and with moral duty and obligation ● a set of moral principles or values ● a theory or system of moral values 2 ● the principles of conduct governing an individual or a group. Ethics, in all of these definitions, is concerned with right or wrong behavior. This reading focuses on the discipline or study of ethics. 1. THE DISCIPLINE OF ETHICS This discipline...

Words: 20786 - Pages: 84

Premium Essay

Test

...1 CHAPTER 1: BACKGROUND TO AND OVERVIEW OF THE RESEARCH 1.1 INTRODUCTION This study focuses on the influence of job satisfaction on burnout among pharmaceutical sales representatives. Chapter 1 deals with the background to the research, the problem statement and the research questions, the aims of the study, the paradigm perspectives of the research, the research design, the research methodology and the layout of the chapters. 1.2 BACKGROUND TO THE RESEARCH People are a vital component of the production factors of an organisation (Storey, 1995). A variety of factors influence their work lives. These factors affect their performance and ultimate productivity (George, 2000). Job satisfaction is a key factor in productivity. Employees’ satisfaction levels are reflected in their intrinsic and extrinsic willingness to put their labour at the disposal of their employer (O’ Malley, 2000). Job satisfaction is certainly not the only factor that causes people to produce at different rates (Daniels, 2001). In addition to being influenced by the level of satisfaction, performance is affected by a worker's ability as well as a number of situational and environmental factors such as mechanical breakdowns, lowquality materials, an inadequate supply of materials, availability of stock and market forces (Gower, 2003). Nevertheless, in the case of lower-level jobs where little ability is required, job satisfaction seems to be one of the key determinants of performance......

Words: 14989 - Pages: 60

Premium Essay

Myths

...Contents Preface Acknowledgments Introduction 1 BRAIN POWER Myth #1 Most People Use Only 10% of Their Brain Power Myth #2 Some People Are Left-Brained, Others Are Right-Brained Myth #3 Extrasensory Perception (ESP) Is a Well-Established Scientific Phenomenon Myth #4 Visual Perceptions Are Accompanied by Tiny Emissions from the Eyes Myth #5 Subliminal Messages Can Persuade People to Purchase Products 2 FROM WOMB TO TOMB Myth #6 Playing Mozart’s Music to Infants Boosts Their Intelligence Myth #7 Adolescence Is Inevitably a Time of Psychological Turmoil Myth #8 Most People Experience a Midlife Crisis in | 8 Their 40s or Early 50s Myth #9 Old Age Is Typically Associated with Increased Dissatisfaction and Senility Myth #10 When Dying, People Pass through a Universal Series of Psychological Stages 3 A REMEMBRANCE OF THINGS PAST Myth #11 Human Memory Works like a Tape Recorder or Video Camera, and Accurate Events We’ve Experienced Myth #12 Hypnosis Is Useful for Retrieving Memories of Forgotten Events Myth #13 Individuals Commonly Repress the Memories of Traumatic Experiences Myth #14 Most People with Amnesia Forget All Details of Their Earlier Lives 4 TEACHING OLD DOGS NEW TRICKS Myth #15 Intelligence (IQ) Tests Are Biased against Certain Groups of People My th #16 If You’re Unsure of Your Answer When Taking a Test, It’s Best to Stick with Your Initial Hunch Myth #17 The Defining Feature of Dyslexia Is Reversing Letters Myth #18 Students Learn Best When Teaching Styles Are Matched......

Words: 130018 - Pages: 521

Premium Essay

Study Habits

.... Organization Theory Challenges and Perspectives John McAuley, Joanne Duberley and Phil Johnson . This book is, to my knowledge, the most comprehensive and reliable guide to organisational theory currently available. What is needed is a text that will give a good idea of the breadth and complexity of this important subject, and this is precisely what McAuley, Duberley and Johnson have provided. They have done some sterling service in bringing together the very diverse strands of work that today qualify as constituting the subject of organisational theory. Whilst their writing is accessible and engaging, their approach is scholarly and serious. It is so easy for students (and indeed others who should know better) to trivialize this very problematic and challenging subject. This is not the case with the present book. This is a book that deserves to achieve a wide readership. Professor Stephen Ackroyd, Lancaster University, UK This new textbook usefully situates organization theory within the scholarly debates on modernism and postmodernism, and provides an advanced introduction to the heterogeneous study of organizations, including chapters on phenomenology, critical theory and psychoanalysis. Like all good textbooks, the book is accessible, well researched and readers are encouraged to view chapters as a starting point for getting to grips with the field of organization theory. Dr Martin Brigham, Lancaster University, UK McAuley et al. provide a highly readable......

Words: 230271 - Pages: 922

Free Essay

Frontline

...FRONTLINE JANUA RY 1 3, 2 012 WWW.FRONTLINE.IN INDIA’S NATIONAL MAGAZINE RS.25 WORLD AFFAIRS IRAQ FOOD SECURITY PDS CLIMATE CHANGE DURBAN Exit America 49 What people say 96 Uncertain stand 114 Remembering TAGORE On his 150th birth anniversary VOLUME 28 NUMBER 27 TH E STAT E S Fiery trap in Kolkata 41 SC IE NCE Higgs signal? 44 WOR L D A F F A I R S Iraq: Exit America War crimes in the trash Russia: December Revolution Pakistan: Volatile state India & China: Troubled equations DECEMBER 31, 2011 - JANUARY 13, 2012 C O V ER S T O RY 49 52 ISSN 0970-1710 Timeless Tagore As an activist, thinker, poet and rural reconstructionist, Rabindranath Tagore continues to be relevant. A tribute on the 150th anniversary of his birth. 4 WWW.FRONTLINE.IN Jayati Ghosh: Mess in eurozone R.K. Raghavan: A lost battle? 108 118 BOOKS LE TTE R S 73 127 54 57 61 TR AVE L Jungles of Borneo 64 AR T Achuthan Kudallur’s journey 85 H ISTOR Y Of Quit India, Nehru & Communist split 89 FOOD SEC UR I T Y Understanding the PDS Kerala: Power of literacy Bihar: Coupon fiasco Jharkhand: Strong revival Chhattisgarh: Loud no to cash E CONOM Y Losing momentum Interview: C. Rangarajan, Chairman, PMEAC CL IM A TE C H A N G E Uncertain stand in Durban CONTR OV E R S Y Mullaperiyar dispute: Deep distrust Fallout of fear OBITU A R Y Humble genius: Mario......

Words: 77117 - Pages: 309

Free Essay

Art and Story Proceedings 2004

...Proceeding for the School of Visual Arts Eighteenth Annual National Conference on Liberal Arts and the Education of Artists: Art and Story CONTENTS SECTION ONE: Marcel’s Studio Visit with Elstir……………………………………………………….. David Carrier SECTION TWO: Film and Video Narrative Brief Narrative on Film-The Case of John Updike……………………………………. Thomas P. Adler With a Pen of Light …………………………………………………………………… Michael Fink Media and the Message: Does Media Shape or Serve the Story: Visual Storytelling and New Media ……………………………………………………. June Bisantz Evans Visual Literacy: The Language of Cultural Signifiers…………………………………. Tammy Knipp SECTION THREE: Narrative and Fine Art Beyond Illustration: Visual Narrative Strategies in Picasso’s Celestina Prints………… Susan J. Baker and William Novak Narrative, Allegory, and Commentary in Emil Nolde’s Legend: St. Mary of Egypt…… William B. Sieger A Narrative of Belonging: The Art of Beauford Delaney and Glenn Ligon…………… Catherine St. John Art and Narrative Under the Third Reich ……………………………………………… Ashley Labrie 28 15 1 22 25 27 36 43 51 Hopper Stories in an Imaginary Museum……………………………………………. Joseph Stanton SECTION FOUR: Photography and Narrative Black & White: Two Worlds/Two Distinct Stories……………………………………….. Elaine A. King Relinquishing His Own Story: Abandonment and Appropriation in the Edward Weston Narrative………………………………………………………………………….. David Peeler Narrative Stretegies in the Worlds of Jean Le Gac and Sophe Calle…………………….. Stefanie......

Words: 117240 - Pages: 469