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Efficient Operations
Rapid Expansion

FORTESCUE
METALS
GROUP LTD IS
AUSTRALIA’S
NEW FORCE IN
IRON ORE.

Fortescue’s 155 million tonne per annum
(mtpa) transformation is underway. Existing operations at Cloudbreak and Christmas
Creek have ramped up to 55mtpa and construction has begun on infrastructure to grow production at the Chichester Hub to
90mtpa.
Expansion work is taking place across the integrated rail and port supply chain and construction is well underway at Fortescue’s next mining operation, the Solomon Hub.
Ramp up to a 60mtpa operation at the
Solomon Hub is scheduled for June 2013.
The development pipeline continues to grow with Fortescue’s resource inventory now totalling more than 10 billion tonnes, positioning your Company as one of the world’s major resource powerhouses.
The year ahead is an exciting one for your Company as we continue to increase production at our existing minesites and transform to a 155mtpa resource powerhouse through the development of the
Solomon Hub.
Cover Image: part of Fortescue’s second reclaimer arriving at Herb Elliott Port.

4

Chairman’s Statement

7

Chief Executive Officer’s
Statement

9

3

Operations Report

12

Reserves and Resources
Report

14

Sustainability Report

24

Corporate Governance

33

Financial Report

34

Directors’ Report

44

Remuneration Report

63

Auditor’s Independence
Declaration

64

Financial Statements

120

Directors’ Declaration

121

Independent Auditor’s
Report to the Members

124

Shareholder Information

126

Tenement Report

131

Corporate Directory

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Our vision is to be the safest, lowest cost and most profitable iron ore producer. The entire
Fortescue Family works towards this goal by setting and achieving stretch targets through innovative thinking, frugality and never, ever giving up. We are committed to unlocking the potential of the iron ore rich Pilbara region of Western Australia for the benefit of all stakeholders, including our Shareholders, employees, our contracting partners and the communities in which we live and work.

CHAIRMAN’S
STATEMENT

“What difference has getting a job made to your life?”
Almost as one they answered,
“everything”.

FORTESCUE
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

4

In three years Fortescue has transitioned from First
Ore on Ship to a Company reporting revenues of some $5.5 billion dollars.
Yet our company’s growth has only just begun.

4

Growth in the strength of our culture. Growth in the ability of our people. Growth in the depth of our leadership team. Growth in our capability. Growth in the global importance of our resources and infrastructure to the world steel industry. In short, well planned, well funded, exciting growth. Growth of a massive new resource supply and delivery asset base, wrought from only new discoveries and serious innovation in all aspects of implementation. As your new Chairman, what
I appreciate most about our
Company is that unlike most major mining developments we read about happening offshore, ours is happening right here.

Big projects in South America or
“new Pilbaras” in West Africa are common headlines competing with Australia, but our expansion to 155 million tonnes per annum
(mtpa), the biggest single step expansion in our mining history, is Australian. Helping to build our community and economy. This is major economic growth despite the severe headwinds suffered by our Company and others from poorly thought out, election motivated, taxation policy. Policy rushed through in ignorance of any proper standard of governance or principles of fairness between industry players.

Fortescue, as usual, will persevere.
With new appointments across the team, we are well equipped for the challenges ahead. A major event was the welcoming to Fortescue of Mr Nev Power who took on the role of Chief Executive Officer when I stepped down on the 18th of July, eight years to the day since founding the Company.
Nev joins Peter Meurs and our other leaders with the strength of personality to lead with humility, encouragement and enthusiasm.

They have the confidence to delegate and to empower and encourage innovation and integrity.
Further, Nev’s array of skills also directly matches our key areas of competence in exploration, mining, the steel industry and contractor relationships for mining and construction. With a strong executive team and three years of careful planning behind us, the time was right for me to transition to non-executive.
I owe a great debt of gratitude to all our staff, Board members and
Shareholders. Also, for some years, our Company has made meaningful philanthropic contributions at negligible cost to Shareholders, but through our reputation, leadership and logistics, we have made measurable difference.
One of my most satisfying moments came only months ago when a group of Fortescue team members from all parts of our business gathered in Port Hedland
- the home base of our Vocational
Training and Employment
Centre (VTEC) - to celebrate the achievement of our Summit
300 target. The achievement of this commitment was cause for celebration and the smiling, excited faces all around me showed just how much passion and energy had been poured into this effort.
The real power of this achievement and our ongoing commitment to training and guaranteed jobs for

Such individual empowerment is a key part of our values platform. The same sense of achievement that is evident from our VTEC graduates extends through to our operations teams and beyond to the Perth office. These values drive such milestone achievements as the completion of the new Christmas
Creek mine, the commissioning of the new rail spur and the ramp up of production that delivered the
55 million tonne (mt) run rate in
June 2011. Our core values have provided the environment to achieve great outcomes that are reflected in our past year. Going forward it is the continuation of these values that will deliver our expansion and operational ambitions. Christmas Creek

5

Herb Elliott Port third berth under construction

With the operations team on track, your Board approved expansion plans on your behalf to take
Fortescue to the next level of production up to 155mt - a target known internally as T155. It’s with a mix of expectation and excitement
I can report that the integrated development of T155’s mining, port and rail operations is rolling out rapidly, according to plan and budget.
We will continue to report the key milestones in the coming year.

“I can report that the integrated development of T155’s mining, port and rail operations is rolling out rapidly, according to plan and budget.”

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

In construction:
Second and third train unloaders and rail loops at Hedland

our first Australians was shown on the sidelines of the celebration.
Speaking with the men and women who had trained and secured jobs with Fortescue, I asked them one question. “What difference has getting a job made to your life?”
Almost as one they answered,
“everything”.

4200 surface miner in action at Cloudbreak

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

6

“The past eight years as your
CEO have been extremely satisfying and it is now a great privilege to serve as your
Chairman.”

The key to our growth plans is utilising the world-competitive infrastructure platform that
Fortescue has established over its Pilbara tenement footprint.
A footprint that, put simply, has no parallel in the global mining industry. 85,000km2 of the most prospective and profitable iron ore mining region in the world, dwarfing the size of all competitors. It has already yielded
10 billion tonnes (bt) of iron ore resources and the exploration team tell me that we have only just begun. Should the world’s growth economies continue to indicate that our independent supply of competitive high quality iron ore is required to sustain their minimum growth plans, our exploration target is to shore up the
Company’s Reserve and Resource base to underwrite a 355mtpa iron ore production platform, and then leave the rest to our best-ofindustry development, finance and implementation teams.
The integrated Fortescue team has the energy and foresight to both create and optimise these opportunities. A recent example is the announcement in
February of the discovery of more than one billion tonnes of high grade Brockman iron formation at Nyidinghu, neighbouring
Cloudbreak, a significant and valuable addition to Fortescue’s growing resource portfolio. Its development plans, as you would expect, are already advanced.

6

Only a month later the exploration team pushed our resource portfolio over the 10bt barrier with the announcement of a 625mt maiden resource estimate for the Western
Hub, cementing Fortescue’s determination to go ahead with development of Anketell Port, and secure Fortescue’s infrastructure requirements long into the future.

Both resource areas are expected to grow substantially.
In closing and on behalf of your
Board, I would like to thank you for your continuing and unwavering support of Fortescue. The past eight years as your CEO have been extremely satisfying and it is now a great privilege to serve as your
Chairman. In taking over this role
I would like to thank Mr Herb
Elliott for his wonderful guidance, mentorship and standard that he has set. His steady hand as previous Chairman since 2007 is as appreciated as his commitment to continue his contribution as lead independent Director. Mr Russell
Scrimshaw played a pivotal role in
Fortescue’s early development and maturity to a major mining house.
His retirement from the Board as a key executive and close friend, was accepted with regret. Finally,
I would also like to thank Mr Ian
Burston and Mr Ian Cumming who recently retired as a Non-Executive
Directors. We welcome Mr Bud
Scruggs and Mr Geoff Raby as new
Board members. They have already made valuable contributions.
I look forward to continuing to share the journey with you as
Fortescue realises its full potential to grow its contribution to the
Australian economy and the developing world. As we evolve into one of the world’s foremost mining companies, I thank God and all our people for rendering the previously thought impossible possible, and creating the platform that is facilitating Fortescue’s massive growth.

Andrew Forrest

The magnificent story of
Fortescue’s development from an idea backed by a couple of under-explored
Pilbara tenements into a 55 million tonnes per annum (mtpa) major iron ore miner and exporter is well known and without precedent. Even before I joined this amazing company in February 2011, I knew the Fortescue story and was in awe of the speed of development.
The team here is now focused on writing a new chapter of the
Fortescue story, growing our production capacity by 100mtpa and transforming the company in the process.
The massive strength of China continues, combined with the growth of emerging economies such as India, provides Australia

with a unique opportunity to not only weather the economic storm faced across the world but in fact build a strong and resilient country for the future.
We will continue to do whatever we can to encourage the world’s emerging economies to think of
Australia first for the raw materials to fuel their growth and for Iron
Ore to come to the Pilbara, home of Fortescue’s 85,000km2 of tenements and the world’s best address for iron ore.
Culture is the key to successful expansion at Fortescue and the mutually supportive nature of our teams is just one example of this very important asset. Fortescue’s teams across operations, development and corporate are integrated and are all committed to achieving our growth targets.
Construction of key infrastructure is progressing well at the Solomon
Hub, the site of the majority of the growth to 155mtpa. The Solomon
Hub is at the leading edge of Fortescue’s transformation and will become a showcase for innovative and progressive mining technology at all stages of the process from mine planning through to processing and transport.
Expansion works at Herb
Elliott Port are on track to be completed late in
2012. In fact, the third berth is almost complete

Fortescue’s culture and the “can do, never give up” attitude of our people are what differentiates this company from the many others operating in
Australia and around the world.” with the second shiploader delivered and put in place in late
September as this report went to press. Dredging for the fourth berth is well advanced, as is the stockyard expansion and construction work on the second and third rail loop and train unloaders. There’s an updated photo on the next page outlining the work at Port Hedland.
Along the Fortescue railway, earthworks are well advanced for the 120 kilometres of track duplication between Port Hedland and the Cloudbreak minesite in the
Chichester Hub. Work is underway on the 130km spur line to the
Solomon Hub. The rail expansion will be completed in January 2013 and will include four new bridges.
One of the major milestones achieved during the year was the successful completion of the first stage of expansion within the
Chichester Hub.

7

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

CHIEF EXECUTIVE
OFFICER’S STATEMENT

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

8

In just 14 months, Fortescue’s rail line was extended 50km from
Cloudbreak through to Christmas
Creek and a 20mtpa ore processing facility (OPF) was constructed.
All phase one infrastructure was commissioned during the financial year and mining was ramped up to meet the new production capacity. Teams are now in place and undertaking earthworks for the second OPF at Christmas Creek, the accommodation village is being expanded to 1,600 rooms and contracts have been awarded for the design, build and operation of the remote crushing hub and overland conveyor system. This second phase of expansion work is due to be fully commissioned and ramped up by the end of 2012 and will take production at the
Chichester Hub to 90mtpa.
Moving over to our operations, the team performed strongly over the past 12 months, increasing our shipped tonnes to 41 million tonne (mt) of ore. Adverse weather was a significant challenge during the year, particularly in January and February, but the operations team still achieved the milestone annualised production rate of
55mtpa in June.

Across our expansion projects and operations, engaging local contractors and local suppliers continues to be highly important to your Fortescue team. Thousands of jobs will be created through the construction phase and into operations for our US$8.4 billion expansion project and these will benefit the Western Australian and
Australian economies.
Financially, your Company performed strongly delivering a 76 per cent increase in profit after tax for the year to $1,022.6 million on the back of increased revenue of
$5,442.1m. Operating costs have increased during the past year and reducing these costs is a major focus for Fortescue during 2011/12.
The whole team was pleased and excited to announce Fortescue’s maiden dividend of three Australian cents per share earlier this year. A final fully franked dividend for the year of four Australian cents was declared in August and paid at the end of September.
Finally, I want to share with you news on what I believe are the most important ingredients in the

Herb Elliott Port: efficient operations run alongside rapid expansion “Even before
I joined this amazing Company in
February 2011,
I knew the
Fortescue story and was in awe of the speed of development.” Fortescue story - our people and our culture. Fortescue’s culture and the “can do, never give up” attitude of our people are what differentiates this company from the many others operating in
Australia and around the world. It is embodied by the rapid decision making you see take place in our
Company, allowing us to remain nimble and proactive.
One of my key responsibilities as
CEO will be to protect and grow that culture and develop our
Fortescue Family which now totals more than 3,000 team members and includes a 10 per cent
Indigenous workforce.

8
8

Thank you for your ongoing support and I look forward to sharing
Fortescue’s next chapter with you over the coming 12 months.

Nev Power

OPERATIONS
REPORT

FORTESCUE
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011
ANNUAL

9

Fortescue’s operations are well placed to maintain the 55mtpa rate across the 2012 financial year while development to 155mtpa continues in a mixture of brownfields and greenfields projects, scheduled to take place through to June 2013.

FORTESCUE
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011
ANNUAL

10

Ore being loaded onto a Fortescue locomotive at Christmas Creek

The performance of
Fortescue’s mine, rail and port operations over the year was epitomised by the rapid and successful expansion to 55 million tonnes per annum (mtpa) capacity and the resulting achievement of that 55 million (mt) run rate in
June 2011.

Steady operations at
Cloudbreak

Quarter 2010, as well as the ongoing ramp up of Christmas
Creek mining activity.
The expansion was the first undertaken since the Global
Financial Crisis and has enabled
Fortescue to continue developing its vast tenements and extensive deposits to deliver on strong customer demand for Fortescue ore.

10
10

Particular highlights throughout
Fortescue’s third full year of operations included shipping the
100 millionth tonne of Fortescue iron ore early in the June Quarter and a total one million tonnes of iron ore processed in one week around the same time.

Sadly on December 24th 2010, an accident occurred at Fortescue’s
Cloudbreak mine which resulted in the tragic death of Paul Torre. Paul was engaged by Ausdrill Mining
Service (AMS) at the AMS onsite workshop. Fortescue’s deepest sympathies went to Paul’s family, friends and colleagues while we remain rigorous in our efforts to manage risk.

The increased capacity to 55mtpa was underpinned by the $US630m
Christmas Creek expansion, including the commissioning of the Christmas Creek Ore Processing
Facility (OPF) in the April Quarter
2011 and prior to that the completion of the rail extension to the train load out in the December

Early in 2011, operations were impacted by heavy rain across the Pilbara with a 15 per cent reduction in shipping volumes.
Port operations were also impeded by site closures on two separate occasions due to tropical cyclone activity off the Pilbara coast.
During the last three months of

the financial year, a significant rebound occurred culminating in the achievement of the 55mtpa run rate in the month of June.
Mining operations at Cloudbreak maintained a steady state at approximately 35mtpa.
Significantly, the Christmas Creek
OPF coming on line bolstered the combined end of year ore processing volumes for the
Cloudbreak and Christmas Creek plants to 5.2mt in June compared to the prior monthly average rate for the single Cloudbreak plant of approximately 3.4mt.
Rail operations took delivery of four SD-90 locomotives to support the existing fleet of 15 GE Dash-9s early in the June Quarter 2011, with an additional five locomotives scheduled for delivery in the
December Quarter 2011. The new additions to the fleet and the delivery of an additional rake of
240 ore cars and 20 spare ore cars strengthened Fortescue’s daily rail capacity to five loaded trains from the Chichester Hub to the Herb
Elliott Port in Port Hedland.

Fortescue hit a run rate of
55mtpa in June 2011

Fortescue also upheld its third party commitment when on 24th
February 2011 the first ore from
Fortescue and BC Iron’s Nullagine
Iron Ore Joint Venture was shipped after utilising Fortescue’s rail infrastructure from the previously inaccessible BC Iron deposit near the
Christmas Creek minesite.
Fortescue’s operations are well placed to maintain the 55mtpa rate across the 2012 financial year while development to 155mtpa continues in a mixture of brownfields and greenfields projects, scheduled to take place through to June 2013.
Significantly, mining expansion at
Christmas Creek, rail duplication and port expansion associated with the 155mtpa works program is being undertaken simultaneously, as Fortescue continues to operate at its highest throughput rates in your Company’s short history.

The increased capacity to
55mtpa was underpinned by the $US630m
Christmas Creek expansion. Stockyard at the Herb Elliott Port showing expansion area

Exploration and
Tenements
Fortescue’s Exploration team had another active year, resulting in a number of upgrades for the Solomon Hub and maiden resource estimates for Nyidinghu and Eliwana. In November 2010, the Board took a decision to develop the Solomon Hub and management of this expansion project was transferred to operations. The total Resource Portfolio for the Solomon Hub increased to
3.07 billion tonnes (bt) including
Measured Resources of 108 million tonnes (mt) and Indicated
Resources of 791mt. Further work to expand the resource base in the western part of the Solomon area continues. At the Nyidinghu Project, 35 kilometres due south of the
Cloudbreak mine in the Chichester
Hub, a new Inferred Resource of
1.03bt was announced in February
2011. It is expected that further announcements will be made regarding an expansion of this resource, as a result of encouraging exploration results since that announcement. In the Western Hub area new
Inferred Resources of 624mt were announced. Exploration continues in the Western Hub and elsewhere to capitalise on Fortescue’s massive

tenement holding, the largest in the Pilbara.
Our Tenement Acquisition team was equally active this year, growing Fortescue’s Western
Australian tenement holding to
106,000km2. Details of the portfolio are provided from page 126 of this report. Earthworks are well underway at the Solomon Hub

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

11

Business improvement strategies and a focus on machine optimisation and efficiency at the port underpinned the continued increase in throughput capacity, right up until the 30th June 2011 when the 55mtpa run rate was achieved. For the full year, 41mt of ore was shipped to more than 45 customers across Asia.

RESERVES AND
RESOURCES REPORT
Ore Reserves

12

As at June 30 2011, Ore Reserve estimates for the Chichester Hub were 1,547 million tonnes (mt), of which 38mt were Proved Reserves

and 1,509mt were Probable
Reserves, with an average iron grade of approximately 58 per cent
Fe and measured on a dry product tonnes basis. Ore Reserve estimates for the Solomon Hub were 716mt as

of June 30, 2011, of which all were
Probable Reserves with an average iron grade of approximately 56 per cent Fe, as measured on a dry ROM tonnes basis.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Ore Reserves - as at June 30 2011
Chichester Hub by Category

Proved

Product
Tonnes
(mt)

Iron
Fe%

Silica
SiO2%

Aluminium oxide Al2O3%

Phosphorus
P%

Loss on ignition LOI %

38

60.0

3.33

1.85

0.059

8.2

Probable

1,509

58.2

5.12

2.25

0.051

7.6

Total Chichester Hub Ore Reserves*

1,547

58.3

5.08

2.24

0.052

7.6

ROM
Tonnes
(mt)

Iron
Fe%

Silica
SiO2%

Aluminium oxide Al2O3%

Phosphorus
P%

Loss on ignition LOI %

-

-

-

-

-

-

Solomon Hub by Category

Proved
Probable

716

56.3

7.66

2.93

0.073

8.37

Total Solomon Hub Ore Reserves#

716

56.3

7.66

2.93

0.073

8.37

All tonnes both ROM and Product are dry.
The Measured and Indicated Resources below are inclusive of those Mineral Resources modified to produce the Ore Reserves.
In September 2011, Fortescue elected to report estimated Ore Reserves from the Chichester Hub on a product tonnes basis rather than on a ROM tonnes basis, as was the case with its previously reported reserve estimates. As a result, Ore Reserves for the
Chichester Hub for fiscal 2011 are not directly comparable to the Ore Reserves estimate for the Solomon Hub for fiscal 2011, or
Chichester Hub Ore Reserves estimates for fiscal 2010 and 2009.
The maiden ore Reserve determination for the Solomon Hub was announced on May 20, 2011, and has been estimated by Coffey
Mining Pty Ltd on a ROM tonnes basis.

Mineral Resources

12

As of June 30, 2011, total
Chichester Hub Mineral Resources were estimated at 2,550mt with an average iron grade of approximately 57 per cent Fe.
Other Mineral Resources in the
Chichester Range (Chichester
Other) were estimated at a total of
695mt with an average iron grade of approximately 53 per cent Fe.
The total Solomon Hub Mineral
Resources were estimated at
3,070mt with an average iron grade of approximately 57 per cent Fe.
Maiden Mineral Resource estimates were announced during fiscal

2011 for the Western Hub and the Nyidinghu project. Total
Inferred Resources for the Western
Hub were estimated at 624mt with an average iron grade of approximately 59 per cent and total Inferred Resources for the
Nydinghu project were estimated at
1,032mt, with an average iron grade of approximately 58 per cent.

Indicated Resources and 2,154mt
Inferred Resources) using Davis
Tube cut-off recovery of 20 per cent, with an average iron grade of approximately 33 per cent
Fe, which can potentially be beneficiated to a processed iron grade of approximately 67 per cent
Fe (based on a recovery rate of approximately 30 per cent).

The Mineral resources at the
Chichester Hub, Chichester Other,
Solomon Hub, Western Hub and
Nyidinghu each contain hematite iron ore. In addition, Fortescue has identified two magnetite iron ore sites for which the
Company has estimated Mineral
Resources of 2,465mt (311mt

A summary of tonnes and grade regarding the amount of Measured
Resources, Indicated Resources and
Inferred Resources for each of these locations as of June 30, 2011, 2010 and 2009 are set forth in the charts below. Detailed information on the methods of resource estimation can be found in the relevant ASX releases for each of these projects.

Mineral Resources - as at June 30 2011
Chichester Hub by category Tonnes
(mt)

Iron
Fe%

Silica
SiO2%

Aluminium oxide
Al2O3%

Phosphorus
P%

Loss on ignition
LOI %

Measured

240

59.1

4.08

2.09

0.051

8.1

Indicated

1,724

57.6

5.23

2.70

0.053

7.8

586

55.9

6.54

3.23

0.055

8.0

2,550

57.3

5.42

2.77

0.053

7.8

Tonnes
(mt)

Iron
Fe%

Silica
SiO2%

Aluminium oxide
Al2O3%

Phosphorus
P%

Loss on ignition
LOI %

Inferred
Total Chichester Hub
Chichester Other by category Measured

-

-

-

-

-

-

Indicated

222

50.0

10.89

6.83

0.060

8.0

Inferred

473

54.1

7.58

4.86

0.066

7.5

Solomon Hub by category Measured
Indicated

695

52.8

8.64

5.49

0.064

7.7

Tonnes
(mt)

Iron
Fe%

Silica
SiO2%

Aluminium oxide
Al2O3%

Phosphorus
P%

Loss on ignition
LOI %

108

58.4

5.43

2.03

0.083

8.5

791

56.6

7.05

3.03

0.073

8.3

Inferred

2,171

56.3

7.19

3.54

0.077

8.0

Total Solomon Hub

3,070

56.5

7.09

3.35

0.076

8.1

Tonnes
(mt)

Iron
Fe%

Silica
SiO2%

Aluminium oxide
Al2O3%

Phosphorus
P%

Loss on ignition
LOI %

-

-

-

-

-

-

Western Hub by category Measured
Indicated

-

-

-

-

-

-

Inferred

624

58.7

5.44

3.06

0.091

6.6

Total Western Hub(a)

624

58.7

5.44

3.06

0.091

6.6

Tonnes
(mt)

Iron
Fe%

Silica
SiO2%

Aluminium oxide
Al2O3%

Phosphorus
P%

Loss on ignition
LOI %

Measured

-

-

-

-

-

-

Indicated

-

-

-

-

-

-

Nyidinghu by category

Inferred

1,032

58.0

4.63

3.06

0.015

8.5

Total Nyidinghu(b)

1,032

58.0

4.63

3.06

0.015

8.5

Tonnes
(mt)

Iron
Fe%

Silica
SiO2%

Aluminium oxide
Al2O3%

Phosphorus
P%

Loss on ignition
LOI %

311

32.9

39.35

1.76

0.096

6.1

Inferred(c)

2,154

32.5

39.55

1.86

0.102

7.2

Total Magnetite

2,465

32.6

39.52

1.85

0.101

7.1

10,436

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Magnetite by category
Indicated

Total Mineral Resources

(a) The maiden Inferred Resource determination for the Western Hub was announced on March 23, 2011.
(b) The maiden Inferred Resource determination for the Nyidinghu project was announced on February 25, 2011.
(c ) Approximately 1,234mt of these Inferred Resources are attributable to the Glacier Valley area, which is subject to a joint venture arrangement with a third party.

Competent Persons Statement
The detail in this report that relates to Mineral
Resources is based on information compiled by Mr Stuart Robinson, Mr Mark Glassock, Mr
Clayton Simpson and Mr David Frost-Barnes.
Messrs Robinson, Glassock, Simpson and
Frost-Barnes are all full-time employees of Fortescue and provided technical input for Mineral Resources estimations and compilations of exploration results.
Estimated Ore Reserves for the Chichester
Hub for fiscal 2011 were compiled by Mr Ric
Bartlett, a full time employee of Fortescue,

and have been prepared on a product tonnes basis. Estimates of Ore Reserves for the Solomon
Hub have been prepared on a ROM tonnes basis, and are based on the information compiled by Mr John Hearne of Coffey Mining
Pty Ltd, an independent mining consultancy.
Mr Hearne is a Fellow of the Australasian
Institute of Mining and Metallurgy and qualifies as a Competent Person as defined in the JORC Code.
Mr Robinson is a Fellow of, and Messrs
Glassock, Simpson and Bartlett are Members

of, the Australasian Institute of Mining and
Metallurgy. Mr Frost-Barnes is a member of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining.
Messrs Robinson, Glassock, Simpson, Bartlett and Frost-Barnes have sufficient experience which is relevant to the type of mineralisation and type of deposit under consideration to each be qualified as a Competent Person as defined in the JORC Code.
Messrs Robinson, Glassock, Simpson,
Frost-Barnes, Bartlett and Hearne have each consented to the inclusion in this report of the matters based on their information in the form and context in which it appears.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Total Chichester Other

13

SUSTAINABILITY
REPORT

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

14

14

What sustainability means to us

To us, managing sustainability is part of everyday business.
We look to integrate the principles of efficiency, reduction of impact and planning for the future into everything that we do.
Applying these principles will help us to manage our risks and leverage the opportunities

that they provide, both of which contribute to our resilience as a business over the long term. Ultimately we believe that our approach to sustainability will help us to achieve our vision of being the lowest cost, most profitable iron ore producer in the
Pilbara.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

15

Our approach to managing our sustainability performance
This is the second year we have presented a review of our sustainability performance in our
Annual Report. As you will see, each year we look to improve and develop our disclosure on our nonfinancial performance. We believe that this disclosure will help our stakeholders to make informed decisions about our business.
In past years we have used the
Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) G3 reporting guidelines to inform our environmental reporting. This year we have built upon this approach and have used the GRI to guide and broaden our sustainability performance reporting. Our reporting is self declared as GRI
B application level. A copy of our
GRI level check is available on our website www.fmgl.com.au.

The context in which we operate is continually evolving. As a company we are driven by higher production capacity, new compliance requirements and improvements in our systems. We also apply a cumulative gathering of experience from each year of successful operation. During 2010/11 we undertook a great deal of work to strategically map our key sustainability priorities. We believe that this collection of priorities will remain the key focus areas for our sustainability management for some time to come.
We use a number of systems and processes to manage our performance in each of these priority areas. To ensure that what we report is accurate and reliable, we undertook a comprehensive review of these systems and our sustainability KPIs in 2010/11. The findings of this review will help us to further develop and build upon what we have achieved so far.

Our sustainability performance Fortescue and Contractor Safety Performance
8
7

Our Safety
We will foster a safety culture that aligns with our core values and achieves a safe workplace for our staff and contractors.
During the year we continued to develop and consolidate our existing health and safety program and prepare for upcoming construction and expansion works.

16

Implementation of our Major
Hazards Management Program, focussing on identification and control of our fatality risks; has progressed well during the year. Through this program we completed a series of workshops across our existing operations sites at Cloudbreak, Christmas Creek,
Rail and Port. These workshops involved a significant cross-section of our workforce, including safety and health representatives; to identify our Major Hazards at these locations. We also established a range of Major
Hazard Control Standards; and measured our performance against these through an independent baseline assessment. Over the coming year, we will continue the implementation of the program and expand it to encompass all other areas of the business.
Fortescue’s Lost Time Injury
Frequency Rate (LTIFR) measured
1.4 over the reporting period. This

Injury Statistics

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

16

6
5
4
3
2
1
0

2007-2008
LTIFR*

2008 -2009
Fatalities

Iron Ore industry LTIFR average

is a further improvement in our performance from last year and is reflective of the work and effort that we have put into managing our safety performance over the last year. Our LTIFR results remain well below the industry average of 2.5.
Fortescue regrets to report that our Cloudbreak site experienced a contractor fatality in December
2010. The whole Fortescue Family is deeply saddened by the tragic death and continues to invest significant effort to control and manage hazards at our operations.
We will also continue to work with our contractors as they continuously improve their safety practices. This accident serves as a reminder of the importance of that continuing investment and focus.

2009-2010

2010-2011

*LTIFR refers to both Fortescue and
Contractor staff and is calculated on the basis of 1,000,000 person hours.

In early 2011, Fortescue was cleared of all charges relating to the death of two workers at our rail construction camp in March
2007. Although the impacts of
Cyclone George in 2007 have been devastating, we are pleased that the Magistrate found that Fortescue was not at fault. This decision by no means closes Fortescue’s involvement or response to Cyclone
George. The devastation caused by Cyclone George and its effect on our employees, our contractors’ employees and their families will be forever remembered within
Fortescue. We will continue to work with our building contractors to ensure that they manage risks associated with the construction of our camp infrastructure.

Our Governance

Fortescue Workforce Profile
3500

Over the past year we have continued to build on our corporate governance policies and procedures. This work has been completed at both the corporate level and at our operations. Good governance is one of the most important aspects of building a resilient and sustainable business over the longer term.
Our business is governed through a range of decision-making forums, policies and management systems.
All of these mechanisms combined, help our staff to live the Fortescue values and to manage our risks.
The Fortescue Audit & Risk
Management Committee of the
Board has oversight for Fortescue’s risks and opportunities. Our
Executive team help the business to set policy and to measure our performance and success. Our entire family is then involved in the delivery of our strategies and commitments on the ground. We all share responsibility in making sure that our business is a success.
We have developed a number of policies which help us to manage our sustainability performance across our business. These include:

Directors’ Code of Conduct;

Employees’ Code of Conduct;

Safety Policy;

Community Policy;

Environment Policy; and

Climate Change and Energy
Management Policy.
These policies are supported by a multitude of systems and processes

3000
2500
2000
1500
1000
500
0

2007-2008

to manage our performance in each policy area. In addition, we have implemented a whistleblower hotline service. This service is made available to all staff and contractors.
All members of the Fortescue
Family are encouraged to report issues such as suspected corruption or unethical behaviour.

Our People
We will build a high performance culture that empowers, values and looks after the well-being of everyone in the Fortescue Family.

Workforce profile
As a rapidly-growing mining company, our staff and contractor numbers also continue to grow.
This year our workforce grew to record levels. At the close of the financial year we employed a total of 3013 employees. Our business also continues to be supported by a large contractor base. Contractor numbers remained relatively steady over the year with a total of 2075 contractors engaged at the end of
June 2011.
Workplace diversity is an important consideration for our business.

20%
15%
10%
5%
2007-2008

2008 -2009

2008 -2009
Male

Fortescue Employee Turnover

0%

1202
320

500
167

2009-2010

2010-2011

2316
697

1762
463

2009-2010

17

2010-2011

Female

Approximately 23 per cent of our positions are held by women.
Women currently hold 9.6 per cent of the available management positions. At present there are no women at Executive or Board level.
Another important diversity measure for our business is
Aboriginal employment. We continue to be committed to building capacity and skills within the Aboriginal community of
Western Australia. One of the ways we can do this is through direct employment opportunities. At the end of June 2011, Aboriginal employees comprised over 9.5 per cent of our total workforce.
We will work to further improve and strengthen employment and career opportunities of our
Aboriginal colleagues. This will include an ongoing focus on our regional Aboriginal employment models, the provision of sustainable housing in regional areas, pre employment initiatives, training and development initiatives.
Further information on our
Aboriginal employment approach is detailed in the case study on the next page.
Given the stresses of the external economic environment, a shortage of skilled labour in the mining industry and the fly in fly out
(FIFO) nature of our operations, we are happy to report a relatively low turnover rate. Our rolling turnover rate for the period decreased slightly from 15.65 to
14.96 per cent. This is still well below the average turnover rate of approximately 22 per cent for other
FIFO operations.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Employee Numbers

We will identify and manage our business risks, implement effective governance systems and report on our performance annually. FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

18

Our Herb Elliott Port workforce of around 140 people is 100 per cent residential and comprised of more than 35 per cent Aboriginal
Australians.

18
18

The Fortescue social investment that gives local
Aboriginal Australians a “hand up” is multidimensional. It is a story that embraces payments to traditional owners, training, employment and housing. One Fortescue, One Family;
Changing Lives Through
Employment
Fortescue is committed to the training and employment of local
Aboriginal people.
Within this context, we recognise that our Land Access Agreements need to reflect real opportunities for local communities and
Aboriginal people; that is, real training and guaranteed jobs replacing welfare and a self empowering future for all
Aboriginal people.
The Fortescue social investment that gives local Aboriginal
Australians a “hand up” is multidimensional. It is a story that embraces payments to traditional owners, training, employment and housing. Our Aboriginal Australian employees, contractors and their families are a critical, respected and embraced part of our Fortescue
Family.
VTEC Training
Fortescue is proud of its Vocational
Training and Employment Centres
( VTEC) at South Hedland and
Roebourne. These two centres are our community cornerstones that enable Aboriginal training and employment. The centres provide work readiness, skills training, employment programs and support to assist Aboriginal people to improve their employment prospects. First established in South Hedland in 2006, the VTEC has trained over
500 people for work with Fortescue or its contractors. As stated above,
9.5 per cent of our workforce was
Aboriginal as at the end of June
2011.
Our Roebourne VTEC was established in September 2010, and as at the end of June has trained 25 local people.
VTEC Services
VTEC Services is an alternative path into the workforce and

undertakes contract work in Port
Hedland, including landscaping, house maintenance and pest management. This work enables
Aboriginal people to gain valuable work experience, improving work routines and addressing employment barriers.
V TEC Services candidates have the opportunity to progress into the
V TEC training programs or direct employment with Fortescue.
Employment
Our residential workforce at
Port Hedland includes 115 local
Fortescue Aboriginal colleagues who commute on a fly-in-flyout roster from Hedland to our
Chichester Hub operations.
Our Herb Elliott Port workforce of around 140 people is 100 per cent residential and comprised of more than 35 per cent Aboriginal
Australians.
Fortescue has committed to employing 100 Aboriginal people from Roebourne who initially will be fly-in-fly-out to our Pilbara operations until there is an opportunity to deploy this workforce at the proposed new multi-user bulk export port at
Anketell.
The total income received by
Fortescue’s Aboriginal employees across sites was close to $26 million in 2011. This is helping to economically strengthen the local
Aboriginal people.
Aboriginal Businesses
Fortescue is committed to acting as a catalyst and providing opportunities for Aboriginal businesses. Fortescue gives greater consideration to Contractors that are Aboriginal owned, engage
Aboriginal businesses (including
Native Title Groups) either as subcontractors, partners or in a joint venture arrangement. Greater consideration is also given to contractors that train and employ local Aboriginal people (including
Native Title Groups), award subcontracts to Aboriginal owned

Contractors, and, provide benefits to the Aboriginal Community and/or have a commitment to
Aboriginal workforce participation.
Fortescue currently spends approximately $40 million per annum on Aboriginal contractors, both direct and as subcontractors.
Fortescue’s contractors were employing over 170 Aboriginal
Australians as of the end of the reporting period on Fortescue projects. 19

Housing
Fortescue will continue to invest in housing in Hedland and is currently budgeting for a five year housing construction program in the town.
Fortescue is also committed to extending its housing assistance program to Roebourne employees and hopes to begin a housing construction program during the next two years.
Encouraging Sport
Fortescue is actively negotiating its support of sport at South
Hedland and Roebourne. Fortescue believes sport and recreation programs for Aboriginal Australians is important to strengthen social cohesion, improve school and work attendance, and health outcomes.
Sport also serves as powerful protective factors against juvenile crime, substance abuse, violence and self-harm.
Australian Employment Covenant
Fortescue was a key driver that gave form, definition and achievement to the goals of the
Australian Employment Covenant.
Refer to: www.fiftythousandjobs. org.au. Fortescue has achieved its self imposed 24 month target of employing 300 Aboriginal people by 30 June 2011.
GenerationOne
GenerationOne is a movement to bring all Australians together to end the disparity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians in one generation - our generation.
Refer: www.generationone.org.au.
Fortescue is a foundation enabler of
Generation One.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Case Study

Variety WA is one of many causes which Fortescue supports

FORTESCUE
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

20

endeavour to share our success with the Pilbara communities upon which we depend.

Fortescue Partners to Build
Community Capacity

Training and development
It is important that our employees are well equipped to successfully and effectively deliver on their work expectations. To ensure that our employees and contractors are equipped we provide company inductions and role specific training. Key areas of ongoing focus include safety training, environmental training and cultural awareness training. These types of training are delivered both during the induction process and on the job.

Our Local Communities
We will develop collaborative partnerships that empower local communities to drive self sustaining value and prosperity.

Community engagement

20

At Fortescue we aim to enhance communities, behave with respect and care, take broad responsibility for the side effects of our presence, be open and honest and do what we say we will do.
We have an active Community
Policy that commits us to supporting the Pilbara region today, tomorrow and in the long term.
Our focus is on creating sustainable outcomes for our communities that build the capacity of the local communities and remove the need for ongoing support. We consistently work to meet the needs of the local community as we meet our own needs and will

At Fortescue, we act as a catalyst to build community capacity in various ways. We also have an established set of community objectives that aim to provide mutual benefit. We look to build community capacity through innovative partnerships and initiatives. We have made a number of large local investments in Port Hedland which will contribute to this vision.
These include:
Supporting Community
Amenities
Fortescue is funding $3 million worth of community initiatives in
Port Hedland:


Facilitate and sponsor the establishment and operation of a cafe within a new Marquee
Park (under construction), which can act as a community meeting point and provide a vocational training environment for workers in hospitality. •

Support for a government housing initiative to attract and retain more doctors to the town. •

Helping Variety WA to build a house in Hedland, with the profit from the sale to be used by Variety WA towards its programs for local children.

Community investment
Fortescue invests in our communities at both a regional and local level. We actively support the Western Australian
Government’s Pilbara Cities vision with its commitment to residential workforces, local employment, training and employment of
Aboriginal people. We also provide opportunities for local businesses and contractors to increase capability at various locations across the Pilbara.

We partner to build community capacity
People

Social

Advancing Indigenous
Australians, VTEC, business incubation, land compensation, culture/ arts, “I’ll Give a Day Mate”,
Fortescue Foundation,
Australian Employment
Covenant and enabling
Indigenous Lore tradition,
Variety WA, Doctor housing.

Natural

Apprenticeships, traineeships, local hiring policies, leading safe behaviours, cultural awareness training, FIFO support from Port Hedland, Roebourne,
Fitzroy Crossing and Carnarvon.

Re-investing water opportunities, weed control, obligations agreed with government,
Heritage opportunities, dust control.

Our
Community
and
Fortescue

Economic

Employment, local content, local business capacity building, fees, licences and royalties.

Infrastructure

Renewable energy, residential housing in three communities, increased accommodation capacity and the Marquee Park Cafe,
Variety WA.

During the past few years Fortescue has established a residential workforce at Port Hedland that supports our Port, Rail and
Chichester Hub operations. This workforce lives locally in 330 houses which are either leased from the existing market, or purchased directly by employees with the assistance of Fortescue’s housing scheme. To date, Fortescue has spent almost
$100 million on the construction of new houses in Port and South
Hedland, and has leased houses to an additional value of $16 million.
Continuing investment in Port
Hedland is currently budgeted for in a five year housing construction program. Fortescue also runs a public motel at South Hedland, which assists in meeting short term accommodation for employees and contractors. Investing in housing
Over the next two years Fortescue will undergo a transformative expansion. We will triple in size by mid 2013 through a US$8.4 billion expansion program across the
Pilbara. As a result, our estimated
Port and Rail workforces will increase by an estimated 660 people.
Employment of local Aboriginal people on a fly-in-fly-out roster to our Chichester Hub is also expected to increase by up to 140 people.
To achieve this growth, Fortescue is implementing an interim and transitional workforce arrangement to supplement its current residential workforce at Hedland.
Fortescue retains its commitment to a residential workforce in Port
Hedland and South Hedland. The interim workforce will be fly-in flyout from Perth until the local supply of houses at Hedland is sufficient to accommodate the additional families. As a positive side effect of Fortescue implementing the Solomon Hub,
Fortescue intends to acquire or construct up to 100 dwellings in Tom Price. To date, through purchasing residential land, and/or buying or leasing houses, Fortescue has commenced its Tom Price inventory with ten houses.

Fortescue is studying the feasibility of its Central Pilbara Project which involves a new railway line and new
Pilbara Port at Anketell. Fortescue continues to be committed to a regionally based workforce and subject of course to the availability of suitable land and services, the outcome of the Feasibility Study, funding and internal and external approvals, intends to acquire or construct 300 houses in Karratha.

Our Environment

21

We will manage our environmental impacts and meet our licence requirements and we will strive to improve our resource efficiency.

Environmental Compliance and Management
Our operations are governed by the conditions set out in our
Ministerial Statements, permits and licences. These conditions require us to meet standards of effective environmental management, planning and performance. We have developed an environmental management system and a number of tailored management plans which help us to manage these requirements. During the year we published our third Public Environment Report.
This report provided a detailed synopsis of our performance in the areas of approvals and compliance, energy and greenhouse, waste management, water management, air quality, habitats protected and restored, environmental training and awareness. The full report is available on our website: www.fmgl.com.au. During the year we reported five environmental incidents to the regulators. All incidents were resolved with no further action being taken on behalf of the regulating agencies.

Greenhouse and Energy
In 2011 we formalised our approach to energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions with the development of our Climate
Change and Energy Management
Policy. This Policy recognises that reducing greenhouse emissions and improving energy efficiency

is important to the Company’s longevity, growth and competitive advantage. During the year we also demonstrated our continued commitment to both mandatory and voluntary reporting requirements in the areas of greenhouse and energy. We submitted our second voluntary report to the Carbon Disclosure
Project (CDP). We successfully completed our third report under the National Greenhouse and
Energy Reporting (NGER) Act 2007.
This NGER report was subject to a limited level of assurance by our auditors, KPMG.
During the period, Fortescue’s total greenhouse gas emissions were 641,775 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalents (tCO2-e). This comprised 601,533 tCO2-e in direct emissions and 40,242 tCO2-e of emissions from our third party power supplies (Scope 2). Whilst this was a 33 per cent increase in absolute emissions from last year, it represented a 0.4 per cent decrease in our greenhouse intensity. At
Fortescue, we measure greenhouse intensity as our emissions divided by the tonnes of ore and overburden moved during the reporting period.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Investing in a residential workforce

22

Tonnes of C02e / million tonnes of overburden and ore mined

GHG Intensity

Water

4000

Case Study

3500

Award-winning
Groundwater Management

3000
2500
2000
1500
1000
500
0

2007-2008

2008 -2009

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Scope 1 intensity

The increase in absolute emissions is a combined result of increased production, stripping ratios and construction activity during the reporting period.
The above NGER emission estimates were reviewed by KPMG, who was engaged to undertake a limited assurance engagement in respect of Fortescue’s reporting to the
Department of Climate Change and
Energy Efficiency for the year ended
30 June 2011 under the NGER
Act. KPMG issued an unqualified limited assurance report to
Fortescue on this NGER reporting.
This limited assurance report was prepared solely for the purpose of assisting Fortescue in determining whether the NGER reporting was in accordance with the Act and should not be used for any other purpose or relied upon by any other party.
As a rapidly-growing mining company, Fortescue consumes a significant amount of energy in the exploration, development, extraction, processing and transport of iron ore. In response

2009-2010

2010-2011

Scope 2 intensity

to our growing consumption,
Fortescue undertook a comprehensive program to identify areas for significant energy savings in accordance with the requirements of the Energy
Efficiency Opportunities (EEO) Act
(2006). Our participation in the EEO program is ongoing and requires reporting at the end of each financial year.
Our work on EEO encompassed all our operations including mining, rail transport and port facilities. Through this work we have discovered many ideas that may help reduce our energy consumption. Fortescue will continue to search for new efficiencies in 2011 and beyond.

The Cloudbreak water management system is leading the industry in mine site water management. Our Managed
Aquifer Recharge (MAR) Scheme of groundwater reinjection at
Cloudbreak allowed us to return approximately 73 per cent of extracted water back into aquifers, greatly reducing our effect on groundwater levels and quality in the region. The process allows us to withdraw water for dewatering of ore pits, and return the balance after site use to the groundwater system to conserve water for future use and minimise environmental effects.
This highly successful initiative was recognised at both the
Western Australian Water
Awards and the Australian
Water Association awards with the Infrastructure Project
Innovation Award for significant and innovative infrastructure projects in the water industry.
This award is open to several different sectors and is a testament to the hard work of our Water Team in achieving a leadership position on water management in the mining industry within such a brief period of operation.

22

Recognition
Due to the isolated nature of our operations, we rely on groundwater sourced from the surrounding area.
As groundwater is a finite resource it is important that we manage it in a sustainable manner. Our water management has been recognised by the Australian Water Association, the Western Australian Water
Awards and the state Department of Water as leading the mining and water management industries in mine site water management.
This is an achievement we are very proud of.

Environmental research
We are committed to establishing environmental research partnerships with leading academics and institutions. This research will help us to better understand our environmental impact and the environments in which we operate.
We currently have a multitude of research projects underway. These projects focus on the Fortescue
Marsh communities, vegetation studies on the local Mulga and
Samphire plants and dust and air quality modelling. More detail on these research projects is presented in our Public Environment Report.

Case Study
Samphire research

Case Study
Water at the Marsh
During this financial year we implemented the first phase of a research project which aims to understand the unique groundwater profile and soil moisture characteristics around
Fortescue Marsh that adjoins our Chichester operations.
One focal point of this study is to identify the contribution which groundwater makes to the water requirements of vegetation. This includes soil sampling and the use of a computer simulation model which accounts for ground and surface water sources, vegetation water requirements and varied climate conditions.
The early findings of this research indicate that vegetation on the fringe of the
Marsh has low groundwater dependence and is generally sustained by surface moisture retained in clay soils. Modelling of an extended “dry season” and high rates of evaporation indicate that the vegetation is highly resilient to varied climate conditions. These findings can help inform our management of potential groundwater impacts.
In future stages of this project, the modelling program will be refined to incorporate more detailed information about soil composition and vegetation growth in the area.

As an ongoing partnership since 2008, Fortescue has funded an Australian Research
Council (ARC) project at the
University of Western Australia to comprehensively survey
Samphire vegetation populations in the region. This includes identifying the varieties present, and the environmental factors which impact growth.
Samphire populations are assessed for key health indicators and response to changes in environmental conditions to determine the ideal conditions for Samphire growth. With this information Fortescue can more accurately monitor the health of local vegetation and ensure that suitable environmental conditions are maintained.
This project is scheduled for completion in 2011 with the publication of a PhD thesis and several scientific journal papers detailing the research.
The findings of the research will guide the improvement of
Fortescue’s existing vegetation monitoring programs.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

For further information on our water management, refer to our
Public Environment Report, which is available on our website: www.fmgl.com.au. 23

CORPORATE
GOVERNANCE
Contents
24

2. Board of Directors
3. Board Committees

30
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

24
29

24

1. Overview of
Governance at Fortescue

4. Engagement with
Stakeholders

31

5. Risk Management

32

6. Conduct of Business

32

7. Market Disclosures

32

8. Compliance with
Corporate Governance
Standards

1. Overview of
Governance at
Fortescue
Fortescue is a major producer of iron ore and supplier to international markets. Our strategies and plans are focused on expanding our production capacity to take advantage of the expected continued strength in demand for iron ore. In order to maximise the benefits of our growth we have a vision to be the lowest cost, most profitable iron ore producer in the
Pilbara. By achieving our goals,
Fortescue will create sustainable long term value for its shareholders.
The Board is responsible for the achievement of this objective and relies on management to deliver the approved strategies to ensure achievement of our goals.

24

Pursuit and achievement of our goals is significantly enhanced through a strong and effective corporate governance framework and corporate governance standards which drive the way in which the Group is governed and interacts with its various stakeholders. The importance of corporate governance to
Fortescue is well recognised and will be reflected in a new Corporate

Governance Framework, which is currently under development.
This will reflect the governance challenges faced by the Group due to rapid growth and developing corporate maturity. The new framework will enhance existing governance practices and ensure that as Fortescue realises its rapid growth strategies, there is an appropriate focus on corporate governance across the business and importantly at Board and senior executive levels.

2. Board of Directors
2.1 Role and
Responsibilities
The Board is responsible to the shareholders for the performance of the Group. The Board’s focus is to enhance and protect the interests of shareholders and other key stakeholders and to ensure that the Group is properly managed.
The Board understands the critical importance of a strong and healthy working relationship between it and the executive management team and works hard to foster and grow that relationship. The Board ensures that the management team is appropriately qualified and experienced to discharge their responsibilities. The Board has established a
Statement of Matters Reserved for the Board which states that the key responsibilities of the Board are as follows: •

Developing corporate objectives and strategies with management and approving plans, new investments, major capital and operating expenditures and major funding activities proposed by management; Monitoring performance against defined performance expectations and reviewing operational information to understand at all times the state of health of the Group;



Overseeing management of business risks, including safety and occupational health risks, environmental management issues and community development issues arising from our interaction with the several communities living or located in our geographic areas of operation;



Satisfying itself that the annual financial statements of the
Group fairly and accurately disclose the financial position and financial performance of the Group;



Satisfying itself that there are appropriate reporting systems and controls in place and gain acceptable levels of assurance that proper operational, financial, compliance, risk management and internal control processes are in place and functioning appropriately.
Further, approving and monitoring financial and other reporting; •

Gaining assurance that appropriate audit arrangements are in place;

Appointing, evaluating the performance of, rewarding and, if necessary, removing the Chief Executive Officer
(CEO);







Ensuring that the Group acts legally and responsibly on all matters and gaining assurance that the Group has adopted an appropriate Code of Conduct and that Group practice is consistent with that Code; and
Reporting to and advising shareholders. The Board has also established
Delegations of Authority for matters delegated to the authority of the CEO and hence the CEO remains accountable to the Board through those delegations for the performance of the Group. Whilst the CEO remains accountable to the
Board, he is free to make whatever decisions he believes are appropriate for the business within the boundaries established by the Board.
A key focus of Board meetings is monitoring the decisions of the
CEO. Appropriate time is allocated during Board meetings for consideration of the CEO’s report to the Board on key operational issues and progress towards achievement of corporate objectives. The Board has established a process for the annual evaluation of the performance of the CEO and Senior Executives, details of which are disclosed in the
Remuneration
Report in this Annual Report.
Both the Statement of Matters
Reserved for the Board and the
Delegations of Authority are reviewed annually to assess continued relevance and to identify any areas requiring improvement or change. Where changes are required to these documents, such changes are approved by the Board.
The Board and each of its two committees have recently implemented a formal process to self evaluate their performance annually. The process will be based on a formal questionnaire and the results of the evaluation of the committees is agreed amongst committee members, with the Chair in each case leading the evaluation process, and are reported to the
Board for further consideration and action where required. In each case the committees provide recommendations for improvement where appropriate, which the Board considers as part of any proposed improvement actions.

A similar process is to be undertaken at Board level involving the entire Board and again, led by the Chairman, improvement actions are agreed and acted upon with the assistance of the Company
Secretary.
The individual performance of
Directors has not been formally evaluated previously but rather this has been done by informal consultation between the Chairman and the relevant Directors as required. With the increasing maturity of the company, the
Board is currently reviewing its evaluation process. As a part of that review, a process for performance assessment of individual Directors is being considered.

2.2 Board Composition
Under the company’s Constitution, the Board must have a minimum of three and a maximum of twelve
Directors. One third of the Directors, with the exception of the Managing
Director, must retire at the Annual
General Meeting each year and may seek re-election. Additionally, any new Director, with the exception of the Managing Director, appointed by the Board must retire and may

In order to maximise the benefits of our growth we have a vision to be the lowest cost, most profitable iron ore producer. seek re-election in the year of appointment. The Board believes that its composition represents an appropriate balance of executive and non-executive Directors to achieve the promotion of shareholder interests and governance of the business effectively. The Board also has access to senior executives who attend Board meetings and Board Committee meetings by invitation and who are available at other times as required by Board members.
The Directors of the Group are set out below:

Name

Period of office

Retiring and seeking re-election in 2011

Andrew Forrest (Chairman)

Full Year

Yes

Herb Elliott (Deputy Chairman,
Lead Independent Director)

Full Year

No

Graeme Rowley

Full Year

Yes

Ken Ambrecht

Full Year

No

Geoff Brayshaw

Full Year

No

Owen Hegarty

Full Year

Yes

Ian Burston

To 18 August 2011

Retired

Li Xiaowei

Full Year

No

Mark Barnaba

Full Year

No

Ian Cumming

To 1 September 2011

Retired

Russell Scrimshaw

To 26 August 2011

Retired

Geoff Raby

From 18 August 2011

Yes

Herbert Scruggs

From 26 August 2011

Yes

Neville Power

From 1 September 2011

N/A

25

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011



Changes to the composition of the
Board since the 2010 Annual Report are summarised below:




26

Nev Power succeeded Andrew
Forrest as the Chief Executive
Officer on 18 July 2011;
Herb Elliott stepped down from his role as Non-Executive
Chairman on 18 August
2011, and was succeeded by
Andrew Forrest, the founder of
Fortescue;
Ian Burston retired as a
Director of the Company on 18
August 2011;


FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011



Geoff Raby was appointed as a
Non-Executive Director on 18
August 2011;



Following his retirement as Executive Director Sales
& Marketing in June 2011,
Russell Scrimshaw became a
Non-Executive Director. Mr
Scrimshaw retired as a Director of the Company on 26 August
2011;



Herbert Scruggs was appointed as a Non-Executive
Director on 26 August 2011;



Ian Cumming retired as a
Director of the Company on 1
September 2011; and



Neville Power was appointed as an Executive Director on 1
September 2011.

26

The Remuneration & Nomination
Committee considers the nomination and review of applicants for the Board Director positions. The primary driver for the
Board in seeking new Directors for the Board has been, and continues to be, skills, experience, knowledge and other important attributes which are relevant to the needs of the Board in discharging its responsibilities to Shareholders.
As with all roles in the Company, our policy is to recruit the right people for the right job regardless of race, gender, age, physical ability, sexuality, nationality, religious beliefs, or any other factor not relevant to their competence and performance. The Board is committed to ensuring that an environment of equal opportunity is in place and that all decisions are based on merit.
The Board is aware that various corporate governance reviews in Australia have highlighted the

lack of diversity at Board level. The
Board plans to address the diversity issue more fully in the next year with the finalisation of its formal diversity policy which will drive the objective of ensuring there are no impediments to diversity at any level of the Company.
Gender diversity details for
Fortescue are included in the
Sustainability Section of this
Annual Report. Across the entire business diversity is excellent and the Company enjoys representation by a broad cross section of society.
Fortescue is particularly proud of its record in employing Aboriginal people from the geographic areas in which the Company operates.
This has been well documented in recent Company announcements about the success of our Summit
300 program.

2.3 Skills, Knowledge and
Experience of Directors
The Board believes that a diverse and relevant range of skills, backgrounds, knowledge and experience is necessary at Board level to ensure effective governance of the business. This means that the Board maintains a focus on its composition, thereby working to ensure that the Executive and Non-Executive Directors continue to have an appropriate balance of skills, experience and independence. Retention of corporate knowledge is also important to the Board, so there is also a focus on achieving an appropriate level of retention of corporate knowledge whilst gaining access to new ideas and experience that are relevant to the business. A summary of the Directors’ experience is provided in the
Directors’ Report in this Annual
Report. Mr Scruggs and Mr Power joined the board after the release of the Annual Financial Report and a summary of their experience is included below.

Mr Herbert Scruggs (NonExecutive Director)
Term of Office

Mr Scruggs was appointed as a
Non-Executive Director on 26
August 2011.

Experience

Mr Scruggs is an expert in business leadership, corporate recoveries and step change business improvement. A lawyer by training (BYU 1984), Mr Scruggs has held a number of corporate, government, political and civic positions including Chief of Staff to the Governor of Utah and Chairman of the University of Utah Board of
Trustees.
His operational experience is equally extensive, primarily in the
United States, having served as the chief executive officer and in other senior management roles for a national bank, a property and casualty insurance company, and a long haul fibre optic carrier.
Mr Scruggs served on a number of boards of public as well as privately held companies including American
Investment Bank, Barbados Light
& Power, Deseret Morning News,
Empire Insurance, MK Gold and
Sangart – including service on multiple audit and executive committees. Mr Scruggs served recently as CEO of Huntsman Financial Corporation as well as the Huntsman Cancer
Foundation and previously worked for Leucadia National
Corporation (NYSE: LUK), where he was president of Leucadia
Asset Management Group. He was instrumental in Leucadia’s original decision to invest alongside
Andrew Forrest in Fortescue.
He now provides, among other activities, consulting services to
The Metal Group and the Australian
Children’s Trust.
Other Current Directorships (ASX
Listed Entities): None
Former Directorships in last 3 years (ASX Listed Entities): None

Our policy is to recruit the right people for the right job regardless of race, gender, age, physical ability, sexuality, nationality, religious beliefs. Term of Office

Mr Power was appointed as an
Executive Director on 1 September
2011.

Experience

Mr Power joined Fortescue in
February 2011, was appointed
CEO in July 2011 and joined the
Fortescue Metals Group Ltd Board in September 2011.
Prior to Fortescue, Nev held the position of Chief Executive
Australian Operations for the
Leighton Group subsidiary, Thiess
Pty Ltd, for three years where he was responsible for the Australian construction business with a turnover of $4 billion per annum and 3,500 staff. In this role, Nev was responsible for some of Australia’s most significant infrastructure and building projects across the mining, transport, water and health industries. Nev also spent more than 10 years in senior executive positions with
Smorgon Steel Group Ltd. He was appointed to the role of Chief
Executive Reinforcing and Steel
Products Division in February 2001, a position he held for six years overseeing organic and acquisitive growth in steel making and downstream processing.
Nev spent the earlier years his career in the mining industry through a progression of roles in underground, open cut and processing operations in the base metals, gold and coal sectors.
Mr Power has a Bachelor
Engineering from University of
Southern Queensland and an MBA from the University of Queensland.
He maintains an active interest in managing the family cattle property and is an avid aviator, holding both helicopter and fixed wing licenses with endorsements on a range of aircraft.
Other Current Directorships (ASX
Listed Entities): None
Former Directorships in last 3 years (ASX Listed Entities): None

2.4 Terms of Appointment
Directors, with the exception of the
Managing Director, are required to retire by rotation at least once every three years and are able to offer themselves for re-election.
The Board has adopted a letter of appointment that contains the terms on which Directors are appointed, including the basis of remuneration. The letter can be accessed through the
Company’s website at www.fmgl. com.au. Directors are expected to contribute to the Group primarily relating to the matters set out in the Statement of Matters Reserved for the Board, which can also be accessed through the Company’s website at www.fmgl.com.au. In addition, Directors are expected to contribute to the business of the
Board committees where they are members of a Board committee.
It is recognised that Directors have a diverse range of skills, experience and knowledge and they are expected to contribute their considerable expertise at the
Boardroom table and at other times as required.
Directors are expected to act independently by challenging the status quo constructively, to act ethically in all dealings and assist in setting standards for the
Group, as well as being involved and contributing to all important decisions before the Board.
Directors are expected to comply with all requirements imposed upon them by the Corporations
Act 2001, ASX Listing Rules and the
Company’s Constitution, a copy of which can be obtained at www. fmgl.com.au. The letter of appointment also provides clear direction about the amount of time that Directors are required to commit in order to adequately discharge their responsibilities as Directors.
It is Fortescue practice to allow its Non-Executive Directors to accept appointments outside the
Group with prior approval of the
Board. The commitments of NonExecutive Directors are considered by the Board prior to a Director’s appointment to the Board and are reviewed annually.

Prior to appointment, or offering themselves for re-election, NonExecutive Directors are required to specifically acknowledge that they have the time available to fully discharge their responsibilities to the Group.

2.5 Chairman
The Chairman of the Group has a primary responsibility to lead the
Board and promote the interests of the Group, both internally and in the broader business context.
A key part of the Chairman’s role is to develop a cohesive Board which operates effectively in protecting
Shareholders interests and maintaining strong relationships with the CEO and his Executive team. Andrew Forrest, the founder of
Fortescue, was appointed to the role of Non-Executive Chairman by the Board in August 2011. Mr
Forrest succeeds Mr Herb Elliott as Chairman and was previously the CEO. Mr Forrest, whilst being a Non-Executive Director, is not an Independent Director due to his previous role as CEO and his significant shareholding in the
Company. Mr Herb Elliott is the
Lead Independent Director in the role of Deputy Non-Executive
Chairman.

2.6 Independence
All Fortescue Directors have an obligation to be independent in judgment and actions. The
Board believes that a majority of
Independent Directors is important in order to ensure that the interests of Shareholders are always at the forefront when important decisions are made by the Board. Directors are considered to be independent if they satisfy established criteria, including the following:


They are a Non-Executive
Director of the Company. Any fees paid to them by the Group for services provided are not of such amounts that could make the Director reliant on such remuneration. Directors must have no other material contractual relationships with the Group other than as
Directors of the Group;

27

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Mr Neville Power (Chief
Executive Officer,
Executive Director)

2.8 Independent Advice
Directors and Board committees, in connection with the discharge of their responsibilities, have the right to seek independent professional advice at the expense of the
Company. Prior written approval of the Chairman is required in these circumstances, but such approval cannot be unreasonably withheld.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

28



They are not a substantial shareholder of the Company, this being defined in the
Corporations Act as holding more than five per cent of the voting shares of the Company;



They have not been employed in an Executive capacity by the Group or there has been a period of three years between ceasing such employment and serving on the Board;







They have not, within the last three years, been a principal of a material adviser or consultant to the Group;
They are not a material supplier of the Group, or an officer of or otherwise associated directly or indirectly with a material supplier or customer; and
They are free from any interest which could reasonably be perceived to materially interfere with their ability to act in the best interests of the
Group.

In essence the above guidance is designed to ensure that all
Directors are able to act in the best interests of the Group at all times.

28

Directors are required to disclose circumstances that may affect, or be perceived to affect, their ability to exercise independent judgement so that the Board can make regular assessments of independence.
If a circumstance arises whereby a Director may be required to consider a matter in which the
Director has a material personal interest, that Director ceases to be involved in the decision-making regarding that matter.
The Board has ten Non-Executive
Directors. Of the ten Non-Executive
Directors, based on the above

criteria, seven are considered to be independent and three are considered to be Non-Independent.
The Board believes that it has independent Directors involved in all areas of Board activity where
Director independence is critical, including chairmanship via the deputy chair and involvement in the various Board committees. The lists below shows Directors who are considered to be independent and
Non-Independent:

Independent








Herb Elliott
Ken Ambrecht
Geoff Brayshaw
Mark Barnaba
Owen Hegarty
Geoff Raby
Herbert Scruggs

Non-Independent





Andrew Forrest
Graeme Rowley
Nev Power
Li Xiaowei

As Deputy Chairman, Mr Elliott has been appointed as the Lead
Independent Director to provide a point of contact and coordination where there is, or it is perceived there may be, a conflict for the
Chairman because the Chairman is not an independent director.
Transactions during the year which are classified as related party transactions with Directors or
Director related entities pursuant to International Financial Reporting
Standards are disclosed in the notes to the financial statements.

2.7 Use of Information
The Board has implemented a Code of Conduct designed to ensure that all Directors and employees of the Group act ethically and do not use confidential information for personal gain.

2.9 Remuneration
Details of the remuneration policies and the remuneration paid to Directors (Executive and
Non-Executive) are set out in the
Remuneration Report in this Annual
Report.

2.10 Meetings
The Board meets as often as necessary to fulfil its role. Directors are required to allocate sufficient time to the Group to discharge their responsibilities effectively, including adequate time to prepare for Board and Board committee meetings and in joining visits to the
Group’s operational sites.
During the current year the Board met six times. Generally Board meetings are of one day’s duration and Board committee meetings precede Board meetings on the previous day.
In addition, Board members hold meetings with management as required. 2.11 Company Secretary
The Company Secretary is appointed and removed by the
Board and is responsible for establishing and maintaining appropriate support mechanisms to enable the Board to function effectively. The Company Secretary is also responsible for ensuring that
Board procedures are complied with and advising the Board on governance matters. All Directors have access to the Company
Secretary for advice and support services as required. In addition to these responsibilities, the Company
Secretary is also responsible for oversight of the share registry services provided by Link Market Services.

Remuneration & Nomination Committee Meetings
Name

Term

Status

Meetings
Held

Attended

Herb Elliott (Chairman to Member for full year
18 August 2011)

Independent Non-Executive Director

4

4

Ken Ambrecht

Member for full year

Independent Non-Executive Director

4

4

Ian Cumming

Member to 1
September 2011

Non-Independent Non-Executive
Director

4

1

Andrew Forrest

Member for full year

Non-Independent Executive Director until 18 July 2011 and Non-Independent
Non-Executive after that date

4

3

Independent Non-Executive Director

4

3

Independent Non-Executive Director

-

-

Member for full year

Mark Barnaba (Chairman Member from 18 from 18 August 2011)
August 2011

3. Board Committees
The Board has established committees to assist in the execution of its duties and to ensure that important and complex issues are given the detailed consideration they require. Current committees of the Board are the
Remuneration & Nomination
Committee and the Audit & Risk
Management Committee.
Each of these committees has its own Charter approved by the
Board, and under which authority is delegated by the Board. Each
Committee is required to report the outcomes of its deliberations to the Board so that the Board is fully informed on all important matters before matters are resolved.
The Company Secretary provides support services to each committee.
Committee meeting agendas, papers and minutes are made available to all Board members.

3.1 Remuneration &
Nomination Committee
The Remuneration & Nomination
Committee met four times during the year. Details of committee members are shown in the table directly above.
The role of the committee is to assist the Board in its oversight of remuneration policy and practice and Board member nominations.
The committee considers a diverse range of matters related to its role, including: •

Senior Executive remuneration policy; •

Chief Executive Officer,
Non-Executive and Executive
Director remuneration policy;



Short term and long term incentive plans;



Recruitment, retention and termination policies;



Succession planning;



Nominations for Board positions and review of applicants for Board positions; and •

Board Committee appointments. Full details of the committee’s activities on behalf of the Board related to remuneration matters are set out in the Remuneration Report.

3.2 Audit & Risk
Management Committee
The Audit & Risk Management
Committee met five times during the year. Details of committee members are shown in the table at the bottom of this page.
The role of the committee is to assist the Board in its oversight responsibilities for all matters related to financial management and reporting, external audit, internal audit and risk management of the Group.

Audit & Risk Management Committee Meetings
Name

Term

Status

Meetings
Held

Attended

Herb Elliott

Member to 30 June 2011

Independent Non-Executive Director

5

5

Geoff Brayshaw
(Chairman)

Member for full year

Independent Non-Executive Director

5

5

Ken Ambrecht

Member for full year

Independent Non-Executive Director

5

5

Ian Burston

Member to 18 August 2011

Non-Independent Non-Executive Director

5

3

Mark Barnaba

Member from 30 June 2011

Independent Non-Executive Director

-

-

FORTESCUE
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Owen Hegarty

29

The committee monitors management processes in relation to preparation of financial reports, including the annual financial statements, and the processes in relation to external and internal audit. The committee also assists the Board in regard to compliance with the ASX Listing Rules, the ASX
Corporate Governance Principles
& Recommendations and the
Corporations Act requirements.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

30

This means that the committee reviews the annual financial statements, the adequacy of the financial control environment, applicable financial management and reporting policies (including policies relating to potential fraud and misappropriation) and developments in international financial reporting standards.
The committee also monitors enterprise risk management activity, its impact on mitigating material risks to the business and the work of the external and internal auditors.
In accordance with the
Corporations Act, the Group has appointed external auditors whose primary role is to form an opinion as to the truth and fairness of the

The Group appoints external auditors who demonstrate quality and independence. annual financial statements. The
Group appoints external auditors who demonstrate quality and independence. BDO, Chartered
Accountants, are the current external auditors of the Fortescue
Group. It is BDO’s policy to rotate audit engagement partners every five years in accordance with the
Corporations Act. BDO attends committee meetings by invitation and annually reports to the committee on its independence and the outcomes of its audit. The committee reviews the scope of the annual audit plan and related audit fees. The Company does not have a formal communications policy, however, the Board uses various formal and informal measures to ensure that it communicates effectively with Shareholders throughout the year including;

The committee believes that a robust and risk based internal audit function is a critical part of ensuring that a strong financial risk and control environment is maintained across the Group. The committee has decided that an outsourced internal audit function best suits the needs of the Group and has appointed KPMG, Chartered
Accountants, to provide the service.
KPMG has been providing this service for three years.
The committee approves the annual internal audit plan and monitors findings from internal audit reviews, including actions proposed by management to address issues reported by the internal auditors.

4. Engagement with
Stakeholders
4.1 Shareholders
The Board represents the Group’s
Shareholders and is accountable to them for delivering value through achievement of strategic objectives and performance excellence.

30
30

The Board has developed a strategy for engaging and communicating with Shareholders. Key aspects of the strategy are summarised below.
Shareholders are encouraged to attend the Annual General Meeting, which is the forum for Shareholders to vote on key business issues, including election of Directors, changes to the Company’s
Constitution, adoption of the
Group’s annual financial statements and incentive arrangements.



A team of dedicated investor and media relations resources;



Regular briefings to the investment community and investor representatives;



Presentations and question and answer sessions at industry forums and conferences; •

Periodic newsletters, production reports and media announcements that are available either through the
ASX platform or through the
Company’s website; and



An email alert system that allows interested parties to register for automated alerts of
ASX lodgements.

4.2 Stakeholders
At Fortescue, we aspire to be the corporate citizen of choice that is welcomed by communities that host our activities. To achieve this effective communication and proactive engagement with our stakeholders is critical. We communicate using a number of mechanisms that include engaging community relations professionals that are resident in communities, preferring oneon-one conversations, providing presentations to target community
Groups, holding displays, issuing newsletters and publishing media advertorials. Our stakeholders include our people, Federal, Western
Australian and local governments, communities, traditional owners of land, suppliers, customers, non-government organisations, investors and the media. Together with our stakeholders, we align to positively manage change and secure opportunities for people, economies, the natural environment, the built environment and society.
Fortescue has a strong engagement with Aboriginal people in the
Pilbara, through the Native Title process as well as our Aboriginal

Fortescue actively promotes ethical and responsible decision making through the development of
Codes of Conduct.

5. Risk Management
5.1 Risk Management
Methodology
The Board believes that effective management of risk and opportunity is essential to
Fortescue’s success and future growth. The challenges of rapid growth, including the future expectations of stakeholders, are evident in all parts of the business.
As an emerging major player in the global iron ore market, the Company has developed a structured approach to the management of risk across the whole business.
In essence, this approach means that all material business risks are assigned to the relevant business unit for management and accountability. This means that the enterprise risk management team is focused on working with each part

of the business to assist them to identify, assess and better manage their risks and to align efforts across the entire organisation to facilitate a whole of business risk profile. Assessment of risk and development of mitigating controls are driven by what is required to achieve identified key objectives in each part of the business. These actions are driven by a desire to maintain business risks within tolerable levels.
The Risk Management Programme
(RMP) approved by the Audit & Risk
Management Committee provides the structure within which the
Group undertakes these activities.
The RMP is a Group wide framework comprised of six standards which are the key drivers for a consistent approach to the identification, evaluation and rating of risk. In addition, the standards provide the context and structure within which control activity is identified and evaluated. The RMP sets a framework which aligns risk management activity at all levels of the business with a three tiered focus as described in the following list:


Achievement of the Group’s strategic, operational, developmental and corporate objectives; •

Maintaining a sustainable business that meets the
Group’s obligations for health and safety, the environment, heritage and community; and



Building and maintaining a resilient business that is capable of achieving critical objectives in the face of extreme events which may impact business as usual conditions. 5.2 Risk Management
Governance
The primary focus of the Group’s risk management governance structure and internal control systems is to identify, assess and mitigate material business risks with the aim of enhancing value to
Shareholders and protecting assets.
The two key forums for risk management at Fortescue are:
1. The Audit & Risk Management
Committee (ARMC); and
2. The Risk Management Steering
Group (RMSG).
The role of the Audit & Risk
Management Committee has been explained earlier in this Corporate
Governance Statement, including its responsibilities for enterprise risk management. The RMSG is the key Executive management forum for considering risk activity across the business, including compliance with the requirements of the ARMC.
RMSG has its own Charter and is comprised of the most senior
Executives in the business. A key focus for the RMSG is the work plan of the Enterprise Risk Function, such plan being approved annually by the ARMC. The Group Manager
Risk is responsible for delivery of the plan and has a reporting responsibility to the RMSG. The
RMSG also oversees management of risk within each business unit to ensure that all material business risks are owned and that risk management activity drives down residual risk to acceptable levels.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Heritage and Vocational Training and Employment Centre teams.
The Company has a long-standing policy in relation to the active employment of Aboriginal people.
This policy arose because of demands by Aboriginal people to gain a greater share of the opportunities presented by the mining industry. These demands have been expressed consistently by Aboriginal people and are enshrined in the six Native
Title agreements that we have established across the Pilbara. In exchange for their consent to our mining operations, Fortescue has promised to provide significant assistance to Aboriginal people in securing a job in the Company.

31
31

5.3 Annual Executive
Declarations

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

32

In accordance with the requirements of ASX Principle 7
“Recognise and manage risk” and section 295(A) of the Corporations
Act 2001, an extensive annual certification process is undertaken at Executive level. The process requires declarations from the most senior Executives in the business to support the certifications to the
Board by the Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer pursuant to ASX Principle 7 and
Section 295(A) of the Corporations
Act 2001.
The Executive declarations are broad and consider the key elements of the control environment. In addition to providing the support for the CEO and CFO certifications as noted above, the Board, through the Audit
& Risk Management Committee, uses this process as a means of identifying areas of the control environment where there are opportunities for improvement.
Improvement actions identified through this process are monitored by the Committee until actions are completed. The ASX Principle 7 and Section
295(A) Corporations Act 2001 certifications by the CEO and CFO were received by the Board prior to consideration and approval of the annual financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2011.

6. Conduct of
Business
6.1 Employee Code of
Conduct

32

Fortescue actively promotes ethical and responsible decision making through the development of Codes of Conduct. There are separate Codes of Conduct tailored separately for the Directors and the employees to suit their particular needs. Each code can be accessed on the Company’s website.
Executives are aware that they are required to ensure that employees and contractors under their control are aware of the code.

New employees are required to read and acknowledge the requirements of the code in writing before they commence with the
Company.
In addition to Codes of Conduct, the Group operates a Whistleblower
Policy and hotline and all matters reported are treated seriously and automatically referred to an appointed independent party for follow up.

6.2 Securities Trading
The Board has established a
Securities Trading Policy which outlines the policy for Directors and employees when trading in shares of the Company. Under the policy certain people are identified as designated persons and they are required to comply with the policy with regard to explicit non-trading periods which are set around reporting periods. All other employees are subject to the normal insider trading restrictions with the policy containing a recommendation of the preferred trading periods.
The policy sets out a brief summary of the law on insider trading and other relevant laws and also sets out the restrictions on dealing in securities by people who work for, or are associated with Fortescue.

7. Market Disclosures
The Board understands the importance of keeping
Shareholders and other stakeholders fully informed of material information in relation to the Group’s activities on a timely basis. For this purpose the Group has established a
Continuous Disclosure Policy, a copy of which is available on the
Company’s website. The policy provides a broad overview of the reporting requirements including the statutory environment within which the Group operates. The policy sets out the legal position pursuant to Section 674 of the
Corporations Act and ASX Listing
Rule 3.1, including:


Issues and tests for materiality;



The type of information that

needs to be disclosed;


The process for bringing such information to the attention of the Company and its nominated reporting officer;



The role of the CEO as ultimate decision maker for Fortescue’s continuous disclosure obligations; and



The role of the Board to review all disclosures made during the period since the last Board meeting. With regard to general disclosures at media briefings or public presentations, only the Chairman, the CEO or their delegated person/s are authorised to issue public comments on behalf of the Group or provide journalists and members of the investment community with information. Copies of announcements to the ASX, investor briefings, half yearly financial statements, quarterly production results, the
Annual Report and other relevant information are posted to the
Company’s website at: www.fmgl.com.au. 8. Compliance with
Corporate Governance
Standards
Unless otherwise disclosed in this
Corporate Governance Statement,
Fortescue complies with the ASX
Corporate Governance Principles and Recommendations.

FINANCIAL
REPORT
As at 19 August 2011

Contents
Directors’ Report

44

Remuneration Report

63

Auditor’s Independence
Declaration

64

Financial Statements

120

Directors’ Declaration

121

Independent Auditor’s
Report to the Members

33

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

34

DIRECTORS’ REPORT
Your Directors submit their report on the Fortescue consolidated group, consisting of Fortescue Metals Group Limited
(the Company or Fortescue) and the entities that it controlled during the financial year (the Group or the Fortescue
Group).

Directors
34

The Directors of the Company in office during the financial year and until the date of this report are as follows (Directors were in office for the entire period unless otherwise stated).

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Non-Executive
Mr Herb Elliott
Mr Andrew Forrest
Mr Russell Scrimshaw
Mr Ken Ambrecht
Mr Graeme Rowley
Mr Ian Cumming

Mr Geoff Brayshaw
Mr Owen Hegarty
Dr Ian Burston - retired 18 August 2011
Mr Li Xiaowei
Mr Mark Barnaba
Dr Geoff Raby - appointed 18 August 2011

Information on Directors
Mr Herb Elliott AC, MBE (Deputy Chairman, Lead Independent Director)
Term of Office

Mr Elliott was appointed as a Non-Executive Director of the Company in October 2003, Deputy Chairman in May 2005 and Chairman in March 2007. He retired as Chairman on 18 August 2011 and remains on the Board as Deputy Chairman and Lead Independent Director.

Experience

Mr Elliott is a member of the Remuneration and Nomination Committee. He was a member of the Audit Committee until he resigned from the committee in June 2011. Mr Elliott has been Chairman of Telstra Foundation Ltd and is a former Director of Ansell Ltd and Pacific Dunlop Ltd. He was the Inaugural Chairman of the National Australia Day
Committee, a Commissioner of the Australian Broadcasting Commission and Deputy Chairman of the Australian Sport
Commission. Mr Elliott was also a Director of the World Olympians Association. Previous executive roles include
President of PUMA North America. Mr Elliott is a Doctor of the Queensland University of Technology.
Other current directorships (ASX listed entities): None.
Former directorships in last 3 years (ASX listed entities): None.

Mr Andrew Forrest (Chairman, Non-Executive Director)
Term of Office

Mr Forrest was founding Executive Chairman of the Company in 2003, then appointed Chief Executive Officer in 2005 and was appointed Chairman-elect in July 2011. He was appointed Non-Executive Chairman on 18 August 2011.

Experience

Mr Forrest is the founder, Chairman and a member of the Company’s Remuneration and Nomination Committee. He is also Non-Executive Chairman of Poseidon Nickel Limited and the Australian Children’s Trust that operates, among other initiatives, Generation One and The Australian Employment Covenant.
Since the inception of Fortescue in 2003, Mr Forrest led the company to its current $19 billion market capitalisation and status as the fourth largest global iron ore exporter.

34

He is an Adjunct Professor of the China Southern University and a long standing Fellow of the Australian Institute of
Mining and Metallurgy. His previous executive roles include founder, Chief Executive Officer and Deputy Chairman of Minara Resources Limited, and Chairman of the Murrin Murrin Joint Venture. Non- Executive roles previously held include Director of the Australian Export Finance and Insurance Corporation, Director of the West Australian Chamber of Minerals and Energy and President of Athletics Australia. He has also founded a number of charities being the
Australian Employment Covenant, Generation One and Australian Children’s Trust. Mr Forrest has extensive experience in the mining sector and has won multiple global finance awards as well as The Australian Sports Medal, The Australian
Centenary Medal and the Western Australian Governor’s Award for Citizen of the Year for Regional Development.
Other current directorships (ASX listed entities): Poseidon Nickel Limited (Chairman and Non-Executive Director since July 2007) and Trustee of the SAS Resources Trust since July 2011.
Former directorships in last 3 years (ASX listed entities): None.

DIRECTORS’ REPORT
Mr Russell Scrimshaw (Non-Executive Director)
Term of Office

Mr Scrimshaw was appointed as a Non-Executive Director of the Company in October 2003 and became an Executive
Director in June 2005. Following his retirement from executive duties with Fortescue, Mr. Scrimshaw again became a
Non-Executive Director of the Company on 1 July 2011.
Mr Scrimshaw is a former board member of Commonwealth Properties Limited, EDS Australia, Mobilesoft Limited,
Telecom New Zealand Australia Pty Limited, the Garvan Institute Foundation and Athletics Australia. He is a NonExecutive Director of Cleveland Mining Company Limited and Non-Executive Director of UK AIM-listed Sirius Minerals
Plc. Mr Scrimshaw is an Associate Member of the Australian Society of Certified Practising Accountants. Mr Scrimshaw previously held senior executive positions within the Commonwealth Bank of Australia, Optus, Alcatel, IBM and Amdahl USA.

35

Other current directorships (ASX listed entities): Cleveland Mining Company Limited.
Former directorships in last 3 years (ASX listed entities): None.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Experience

Mr Ken Ambrecht (Non-Executive Director)
Term of Office

Mr Ambrecht was appointed as a Non-Executive Director in October 2003.

Experience

Mr Ambrecht is a member of the Audit and Risk Management Committee and the Remuneration and Nomination
Committee. He is the Principal of KCA Associates, a financial consulting and advisory firm and a Non-Executive Director of American Financial Corporation Inc and Spectrum Brands Inc. Mr Ambrecht was previously a Non-Executive Director of Dominion Petroleum Limited, Managing Director at First Albany Capital and Managing Director of the Royal Bank of
Canada following a 25 year career at Lehman Brothers in New York as Managing Director of the capital markets division.
Other current directorships (ASX listed entities): None.
Former directorships in last 3 years (ASX listed entities): None.

Mr Graeme Rowley AM (Non-Executive Director)
Term of Office

Mr Rowley was appointed as an Executive Director in May 2003. Following his retirement from executive duties with
Fortescue, Mr Rowley became a Non-Executive Director of the Company in March 2010.

Experience

Mr Rowley was an executive with Rio Tinto plc and previously held senior positions with Hamersley Iron and Argyle
Diamonds. Mr Rowley’s previous directorships have included the Dampier Port Authority, the Pilbara Development
Commission, the Council for the West Pilbara College of TAFE and the Western Australian State Government’s Technical
Advisory Council. Mr Rowley is currently Chairman of the National Centre for Excellence in Desalination. Mr Rowley has extensive experience in operational management of both iron ore ship loading facilities and heavy haul railway within the unique Pilbara environment.
Other current directorships (ASX listed entities): None.
Former directorships in last 3 years (ASX listed entities): None.

Mr Ian Cumming (Non-Executive Director)
Term of Office

Mr Cumming was appointed as a Non-Executive Director in August 2009.

Experience

Since June 1978, Mr Cumming has served as a Director and Chairman of the Board of Leucadia National Corporation, a
New York based diversified company with extensive interests. Mr Cumming is also a director of SkyWest Inc, HomeFed
Corporation and Jefferies Group Inc and he previously served on the Board of Americredit Corp. Mr Cumming is committed to community service as evidenced by his leadership roles in local and national organisations. His involvement has included membership on the National Board of Governors of The Nature Conservancy, the Utah State
Board of Regents, the Board of Directors of Ballet West, the Board of Dean’s Advisors for the Harvard Business School and the United Nations Global Summit for Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States. Mr Cumming received his BA degree in Zoology from the University of Kansas in 1962 and his MBA from Harvard Business School in
1970. Mr Cumming is also a member of the Remuneration and Nomination Committee.
Other current directorships (ASX listed entities): None.
Former directorships in last 3 years (ASX listed entities): None.

DIRECTORS’ REPORT
Mr Geoff Brayshaw AM (Non-Executive Director)
Term of Office

Mr Brayshaw was appointed as a Non-Executive Director and Chairman of the Audit & Risk Management Committee in
July 2007.

Experience

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

36

Mr Brayshaw was formerly an audit partner with a large international accounting firm until he retired in June 2005. He has held a number of positions in commerce and with professional bodies including National President of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in 2002, Independent Director and Audit Committee Chairman of AVEA Insurance Limited,
Board member of the Small Business Development Corporation and was formerly the Chairman of a Trustee Company of an Aboriginal Corporation. Mr Brayshaw is also a Non-Executive Director and Chairman of the Audit Committee of
Poseidon Nickel Limited.
Other current directorships (ASX listed entities): Poseidon Nickel Limited (Non-Executive Director since February 2008).
Former directorships in last 3 years (ASX listed entities): None.

Mr Owen Hegarty (Non-Executive Director)
Term of Office

Mr Hegarty was appointed as a Non-Executive Director in October 2008.

Experience

Mr Hegarty has over 40 years experience in the global mining industry, including 25 years with Rio Tinto plc where he was Managing Director of Rio Tinto Asia and also Managing Director of the Australian copper and gold business. He was the founder and CEO of Oxiana Limited (now Oz Minerals Limited) which grew from a small exploration company to a multi-billion dollar, base and precious metals explorer, developer and producer. Mr Hegarty was awarded the AusIMM
Institute Medal in 2006 and the G.J. Stokes Memorial Award in 2008 for his achievements in the mining industry. Mr
Hegarty is Executive Vice Chairman of Hong Kong listed G Resources Group Limited, a gold mining company and
Executive Vice Chairman of CST Mining Group Limited, also a Hong Kong listed mining company. He is a Director of the AusIMM, a member of the South Australian Minerals and Petroleum Expert Group, and a Director of the WA based
Mining Hall of Fame Foundation. Mr Hegarty is also Chairman of Tigers Realm Minerals Pty Limited, a private Melbourne based mining company.
Other current directorships (ASX listed entities): None.
Former directorships in last 3 years (ASX listed entities): Range River Gold Limited (from July 1994 to June 2010),
Oz Minerals Limited (resigned as Non-Executive Director in December 2008).

Dr Ian Burston AM (Non-Executive Director)
Term of Office

Dr Burston was appointed as a Non-Executive Director on 13 October 2008 and retired as a Non-Executive Director on
18 August 2011.

Experience

36

Dr Burston has more than 30 years of experience in Western Australian and international mining. He was the NonExecutive Chairman of Cape Lambert Resources Limited from June 2006 to May 2007 and Executive Chairman from
May 2007 to August 2008. Dr Burston was Non-Executive Chairman of Imdex Limited from 2000 to 2009 and has been
Chairman and Director of NRW Holdings Limited since July 2007. He has also been a Non-Executive Director of Mincor
Resources NL since January 2003 and served as Executive Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Aztec Resources
Limited between June 2003 and February 2006. Dr Burston is the Chairman of the Broome Port Authority and a Director of Kanzai Mining Corporation. Formerly, Dr Burston held positions as Managing Director of Hamersley Iron Pty Limited,
Aurora Gold Limited and Portman Limited and Chief Executive Officer of Kalgoorlie Consolidated Mines Pty Limited.
Previously he worked for the CRA Group (now part of Rio Tinto plc) for 22 years in various senior executive positions.
Dr Burston was awarded the Order of Australia (General Division) in 1993 and was elected Western Australian Citizen of the Year in 1992.
Other current directorships (ASX listed entities): NRW Holdings Limited (Chairman and Non-Executive Director since
July 2007), Mincor Resources NL (Non-Executive Director since January 2003).
Former directorships in last 3 years (ASX listed entities): Cape Lambert Resources Limited (between July 2006 and
August 2008), Auvex Resources Limited (Chairman and Non-Executive Director from January 2009 to September 2009),
Imdex Limited (from November 2000 to October 2009), Carrick Gold Limited (Non-Executive Director from November
2009 to August 2010) and Condor Nickel Limited (Non-Executive Director from March 2010 to August 2010).

DIRECTORS’ REPORT
Mr Li Xiaowei (Non-Executive Director)
Term of Office

Mr Xiaowei was appointed as a Non-Executive Director in June 2009.

Experience

Other current directorships (ASX listed entities): None.
Former directorships in last 3 years (ASX listed entities): None.

Mr Mark Barnaba (Non-Executive Director)
Term of Office

Mr Barnaba was appointed as a Non-Executive Director in February 2010 and joined the Audit and Risk Management
Committee in June 2011. Mr Barnaba was appointed Chairman of the Remuneration and Nomination Committee on 18
August 2011.

Experience

Mr Barnaba is a Non-Executive Director of Adept Solutions. He currently holds the position of Chairman with Western
Power, Edge Employment Solutions (a disability employment organisation), and the University of Western Australia
Business School. He also serves as an Adjunct Professor in Investment Banking and Finance and as a member of the In
The Zone Editorial Committee with the University of Western Australia. Until recently, Mr Barnaba held the position of co-founder and Executive Chairman of Azure Capital and was a Non-Executive Chairman of the West Coast Eagles
Football Club and a member of the Rhodes Scholarship Selection Committee. Mr Barnaba received his Bachelor of
Commerce with first class honours from the University of Western Australia in 1985 and was awarded the JA Wood
University Medal for top graduate, university wide. He then went onto Harvard Business School and received an MBA in
1988, graduating with a high distinction as a Baker Scholar. In 2002, Mr Barnaba was the joint winner of the inaugural
WA Business News award for the most outstanding business leader in the State of Western Australia under the age of 40 and in 2009 was the recipient of the Western Australian Citizen of the Year Award in Industry and Commerce.
Other current directorships (ASX listed entities): Adept Solutions (Non-Executive Director since July 2011).
Former directorships in last 3 years (ASX listed entities): None.

Dr Geoff Raby (Non-Executive Director)
Term of Office

Dr Raby was appointed as a Non-Executive Director on 18 August 2011.

Experience

Dr Geoff Raby was Australia’s Ambassador to the People’s Republic of China (2007-2011). Prior to that, he was a Deputy
Secretary in the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade(DFAT). He has extensive experience in international affairs and trade, having been Australia’s Ambassador to the World Trade Organisation (1998-2001), Australia’s APEC Ambassador
(2003-2005), Head of DFAT’s Office of Trade Negotiations and Head of the Trade Policy Issues Division at the OECD, Paris.
Between 1986 and 1991 he was Head of the Economic Section at the Australian Embassy, Beijing. He has been the Chair of DFAT’s Audit Committee and served as an ex officio member of the Boards of Austrade and EFIC (Export Finance and
Insurance Corporation).
Other current directorships (ASX listed entities): OceanaGold Corporation and SmartTrans Holdings Limited since
July 2011.
Former directorships in last 3 years (ASX listed entities): None.

37

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Mr Xiaowei joined the Board as a Non-Executive Director on 12 June 2009 following Hunan Valin Iron and Steel Group
Co Limited’s (Hunan Valin) subscription for ordinary shares in Fortescue on 25 February 2009. He has been Chairman of Hunan Valin since 1999 and Vice President of China Iron & Steel Association. Mr Xiaowei is a graduate of Zhongnan
University of Economics and Law, specialising in Business Enterprise Management, and also holds an MA from the
Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. He has previously served as Vice Chairman of Lianyuan Iron and Steel Co Limited, Deputy General Manager of Hunan Provincial Metallurgy Enterprises Group and General Manager of Valin Iron & Steel Group.

DIRECTORS’ REPORT
Company Secretaries
The following people held the position of Company Secretary at the end of the financial year.

Mr Mark Thomas
Term of Office

Mr Thomas was appointed Company Secretary in June 2010.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

38

Experience

Mr Thomas joined Fortescue in April 2004 in the role of Group Financial Controller and went on to become Head of
Finance and IT and then Group Manager Finance. With more than 15 years experience in the mining and professional services industries, Mr Thomas has also held senior finance positions with the Goldfields Australia Group and with a number of professional service providers. He has extensive experience in accounting and finance, IT and business administration in the mining and professional services industries. Mr Thomas has a Bachelor of Commerce from the University of Western Australia, Graduate Diploma in Applied Corporate Governance, a Masters of Business
Administration and is a Certified Practising Accountant.

Mr Rod Campbell
Term of Office

Mr Campbell was appointed Company Secretary in November 2004.

Experience

Prior to his appointment as Company Secretary, Mr Campbell was State Manager Western Australia for RaboBank
Australia Limited and before that was a Senior Manager with State Bank NSW Limited. Mr Campbell holds a Bachelor of
Agricultural Economics from the University of New England and a Diploma from the Securities Institute of Australia.

Directors’ Meetings
The number of meetings of the company’s board of directors and of each board committee held during the year ended
30 June 2011, and the numbers of meetings attended by each director were:
Committee Meetings
Board meetings

Audit

Remuneration

38

Director

A

B

A

B

A

B

H Elliott

6

6

5

5

4

4

A Forrest

6

6

*

*

3

4

R Scrimshaw

6

6

*

*

*

*

K Ambrecht

6

6

5

5

4

4

G Rowley

6

6

*

*

G Brayshaw

5

6

5

5

*

*

O Hegarty

5

6

*

*

3

4

I Burston

4

6

3

5

*

*

L Xiaowei

4

6

*

*

*

*

I Cumming

1

6

*

*

1

4

M Barnaba

4

6

*

*

*

*

*

A - Number of meetings attended.
B - Number of meetings held during the time the director held office or was a member of the committee during the year.
* - Not a member of the relevant committee.

DIRECTORS’ REPORT
Principal activities
The principal activity of Fortescue is the mining of iron ore from its Cloudbreak and Christmas Creek mine sites and the operation of an integrated mine, rail and port supply chain. During the year Fortescue received Board approval and subsequently commenced an $8,400.0 million expansionary program to develop the Chichester and Solomon mining hubs and expand the port and rail infrastructure to increase production from 55mtpa to 155mtpa. Fortescue also continues an exploration and metallurgical program which is progressively developing tenement areas outside of the current mining sites.
39

No significant changes in the nature of the activities of Fortescue occurred during the year.

Notwithstanding a committed effort in safety management, Paul Torre was fatally injured in a mobile equipment maintenance accident at Cloudbreak mine on 24 December 2010. This tragic outcome has reinforced the Company’s determination to achieve zero harm through continued implementation of our Major Hazards and Contractor
Management programs. In combination with a greater emphasis on field leadership, Fortescue has once again delivered a strongly improved overall safety performance, with the Classified Injury Frequency Rate (CIFR) improving 25% year on year. The shift in focus, first from lost time injuries to classified injuries and now to recordable injuries, reflects the shifts in maturity that Fortescue has been able to accomplish over the last two years. With a closing CIFR of 7.7, Fortescue is comparable with some of the best in the industry.
The operational performance was impacted significantly by weather events in January and February. Nonetheless, a strong performance across the integrated mine, rail and port supply chain during the 12 months to 30 June 2011 has resulted in increased production with an annualised production rate of 55mtpa achieved in the month of June.
Production and shipments for the financial year were as follows on a wet metric tonne basis;
2011
Tonnes

2010
Tonnes

44,157,628

41,255,407

+7%

162,257,272

113,861,580

+42%

Ore processed

40,619,852

38,418,568

+6%

Ore shipped (including third party product)

40,896,035

40,093,093

+2%

Ore mined
Overburden removed

Increase

Fortescue recorded a profit after tax for the year ended 30 June 2011 of $1,022.6 million compared to $580.9 million in the prior year.
Operating sales revenue increased from $3,220.1 million for the year ended 30 June 2010 to $5,442.1 million for the year ended 30 June 2011 primarily due to higher commodity prices.
Cost of sales increased by 30 per cent to $2,757.6 million for the full year. Higher costs per tonne were driven by the total material moved (strip ratio) and the continued appreciation of the Australian dollar against the US dollar impacting the largely Australian dollar denominated cost of production.
Total refinancing costs and net finance expenses were $1,148.9 million for the year ended 30 June 2011 compared to net finance expenses of $375.3 million in the prior year. This increase is primarily driven by a premium on redemption of the senior secured notes of $668.4 million and bridging facility fees and interest of $30.9 million following on the refinancing of Fortescue’s senior secured notes in October 2010.
Cash and cash equivalents increased by $1,427.2 million to $2,662.7 million at 30 June 2011. Net cash inflow from operations before interest increased by $1,484.0 million to $2,778.2 million in the year ended 30 June 2011 reflecting a continued strong operating performance and higher average iron ore prices.
Net cash outflow from investing activities increased from $564.2 million in the year ended 30 June 2010 to
$1,480.9 million in the year ended 30 June 2011, an increase of $916.7 million which is consistent with Fortescue’s
155mtpa expansion program and necessary capital expenditure to sustain existing infrastructure.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Review of operations

DIRECTORS’ REPORT
Dividends
The Directors announced the declaration of the Company’s maiden dividend of three Australian cents per share which was paid on 31 March 2011.
On 19 August 2011 the Directors declared a final fully franked dividend for the year ended 30 June 2011 of four
Australian cents per share, payable on 30 September 2011.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

40

Refinancing
During the year Fortescue successfully refinanced its senior secured notes through the issue of $2,040.0 million in senior unsecured notes. This refinancing removed the restrictive covenants which existed under the original senior secured notes allowing Fortescue to pursue expansionary opportunities which had not previously been possible. To this extent,
Fortescue has commenced the T155 expansion program to increase production from 55mtpa to 155mtpa and raised
$1,500.0 million in December 2010 as part of the funding for the expansion. To provide additional liquidity and support a
$600.0 million unsecured syndicated bank facility was successfully established in June 2011. This facility remains undrawn.

Expansion
Chichester Hub 40 – 55mtpa

Expansion of the Christmas Creek mine progressed well with the extension of the rail network, first train loading and first production of ore from the newly commissioned OPF all occurring prior to 30 June 2011.

New Projects 55 - 155mtpa
Christmas Creek - Phase 2 Expansion

The second stage of the Christmas Creek expansion is progressing on schedule with significant contracts awarded for the design, build and operation of the second Christmas Creek OPF, together with a remote crushing hub and overland conveyor system. Additionally, a design, build and operate contract for the expansion of the power station at Christmas
Creek was awarded bringing firm commitments for this project to approximately 60 per cent of the total project scope.
Early construction continues on site with roads, bulk earthworks and accommodation construction commenced during the June 2011 quarter.

Solomon Hub

Heritage and environment approvals continue to be achieved on schedule allowing access to begin construction at the Hub. A favourable ruling from the Native Title Tribunal in relation to ongoing negotiations with the Yindjibarndi community provides certainty over the commencement of construction and subsequent mining in this area.
The major contracts (OPF, overland conveyors, stockyard, crushing hub, camps and airport) are progressing into the final phase of early contractor involvement and resource definition drilling and metallurgical sampling continue to support the mine and production plans.

Port

The expansion at Herb Elliott Port remains on schedule with plan changes to defer Berth Five and include an automated mooring system at Berth Four to improve ship efficiency. A number of major contracts have been awarded and contractors mobilised to site. Significant construction work has been undertaken within the port area to accommodate the large scale equipment requirements such as stackers and reclaimers, associated earthworks and new train unloaders. Initial dredging at South West Creek has successfully been completed and further dredging work is expected to commence during the September 2011 quarter.

Rail

40

Approvals to commence construction on both the mainline and Solomon spur were received in June 2011 with construction in both these areas and at various camps well underway. The procurement strategy for rail, sleepers, wagons and locomotives is well progressed with the majority of track requirements accounted for. The project remains on schedule for completion to enable train operations to the Solomon Hub in late 2012.

Other developments

Feasibility study work continues on the new multi-user port facility at Anketell/Dixon Island, a new 250km rail line from the Solomon Hub and the development of new mines around the rail head. The studies have been updated to include the benefits and implications for the inclusion of the earliest development of the recently announced Resource for
Nyidinghu (Chichester Hub) and Flying Fish / Eliwana (Western Hub).
In addition Hematite projects, options for the development of the North Star Magnetite deposit, located 90km from
Port Hedland, are being progressed.

DIRECTORS’ REPORT
MRRT
The Federal government is pursuing a 1 July 2012 commencement for the MRRT regime. Fortescue strongly opposes the introduction of the MRRT and will consider all possible alternatives to ensure that this ill conceived and hastily developed regime is not passed into law.
Given that a further 17 significant parts of the legislation are yet to be released for consideration before being introduced into Parliament, it is very difficult to fully understand the impact which the tax will have on the financial position of Fortescue. Accordingly, Fortescue’s financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2011 do not include an estimate of the impact of this tax.

41

The Fortescue Group’s exploration, mining, rail and port activities are governed by a range of environmental regulatory approvals, including the provisions of specific state agreements and acts, the Environmental Protection Act 1986, the
Mining Act 1978 and the Rights in Water and Irrigation Act 1914.
The Group’s operations continue to expand at all sites. We have responded by ensuring our environmental monitoring has kept pace with our expansion at these sites to ensure that Fortescue continues to operate in accordance with its environmental obligations and commitments. The Company’s environmental performance requirement is reported in the Annual Environmental Report.
The Group’s operations have been inspected and audited by the Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC), and the Department of Mines and Petroleum (DMP) a combined total of four times during the year.
The Group also undertakes regular internal and external audits to test our standards and procedures. Opportunities to improve environmental performance are documented and implemented through a continuous improvement process.

Environmental performance monitoring requirements
The Fortescue group reports annually on its environmental performance and compliance through a host of reports to various regulating authorities including the Department of Water, the Office of the Environmental Protection Authority, the Department of Environmental and Conservation and the Department of Mines and Petroleum.
The 2010 Annual Environmental report was submitted in July 2011.

Greenhouse gas and energy date reporting requirements
The Fortescue Group is subject to the public reporting requirements of the Energy Efficient Opportunities Act 2006 (EEO
Act). These requirements relate to the 2010 financial year and were reported in December 2010.
Fortescue continues to report under the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (NGER) Act 2007 and have its submissions independently audited and verified. The Group is required to report its annual Scope 1 and Scope 2 greenhouse gas emissions and energy use and production across all of its operations. The 2010 NGER submission related to the 2009/10 financial year. The Group will continue to report using financial year periods to ensure that its public greenhouse gas and energy data is consistent, accurate and comparative. The results of this submission are presented in the Sustainability section of this Annual Report.
Diesel combustion is the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions at Fortescue. The primary sources of diesel use include our mobile surface mining equipment, power stations and our locomotives.
Fortescue is progressing with its improvement plan to ensure that suitable environmental management systems are in place to record and maintain compliance with its environmental regulatory obligations and commitments.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Environmental regulation

DIRECTORS’ REPORT
Directors’ Interests
The relevant interest of each Director in the shares and options issued by the Company as notified by the Directors to the Australian Securities Exchange in accordance with 5205G(1) of the Corporations Act 2001, at the date of this report is as follows:
Director

Performance Rights

2,167,938

-

-

964,848,823

-

20,221

G Rowley

19,144,951

-

-

R Scrimshaw
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Options

A Forrest

42

Ordinary Shares

7,590,055

600,000

122,459

K Ambrecht

6,303,030

-

-

G Brayshaw

52,149

-

-

I Cumming

-

-

-

O Hegarty

-

-

-

I Burston

20,000

-

-

L Xiaowei

-

-

-

M Barnaba

-

-

-

G Raby

-

-

-

H Elliott

Unissued shares under options
The number of options on issue in the Company at the date of this report is as follows. All of these options are unlisted and over the ordinary shares of the Company.
Date options granted

Expiry date

Issue price of shares A$

Number under option

11 February 2009

11 February 2014

$2.50

1,650,000

13 May 2010

13 May 2015

$5.00

7,500,000

3 December 2010

20 September 2015

$5.69

400,000

All options expire on the earlier of their expiry date or termination of the employee’s employment. These options were issued pursuant to the Fortescue Metals Group’s Incentive Option Scheme (IOS) and have been allotted to individuals on condition that they serve specified time periods as an employee of Fortescue before becoming entitled to exercise the options. In addition, the Directors have imposed further requirement that the exercise price of certain options is conditional upon the performance of Fortescue shares. These options do not entitle the holder to participate in any share issue of the Company or any other body corporate.

Shares issued on exercise of options
During or since the end of the financial year, the company issued ordinary shares as a result of the exercise of options as follows (there were no amounts unpaid on the shares issued):

42

Number of shares issued upon exercise of options

Date options granted

Number vested

Issue price of shares A$

25 January 2006

-

0.57

543,750

1 June 2006

-

0.70

1,690,000

11 February 2009

450,000

2.50

150,000

13 May 2010

2,187,500

5.00

-

3 December 2010

-

5.69

-

DIRECTORS’ REPORT
Directors and officers indemnities and insurance
Since the end of the previous financial year, the Company has paid premiums to insure the Directors and Officers of the
Fortescue Group.
The liabilities insured are legal costs that may be incurred in defending civil or criminal proceedings that may be brought against the Officers in their capacity as Officers of the Fortescue Group, and any other payments arising from liabilities incurred by the Officers in connection with such proceedings, other than where such liabilities arise out of conduct involving a wilful breach of duty by the Officers or the improper use by the Officers of their position or of information to gain advantage for themselves or someone else or to cause detriment to the Fortescue Group. It is not possible to apportion the premium between amounts relating to the insurance against legal costs and those relating to other liabilities. Conditions of the policy also preclude disclosure to third parties of the amount paid for the policy.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Non-audit services
The Company may decide to employ the auditor on assignments additional to their statutory audit duties where the auditor’s expertise and experience with Fortescue is important.
Details of the amounts paid or payable to the auditor BDO Audit (WA) Pty Ltd and related entities for audit and non audit services provided during the year are set out below.
The Board of Directors has considered the position and, in accordance with advice received from the Audit & Risk
Committee, is satisfied that the provision of the non audit services is compatible with the general standard of independence for auditors imposed by the Corporations Act 2001. The directors are satisfied that the provision of non audit services by the auditor, as set out below, did not compromise the auditor independence requirements of the
Corporations Act 2001 for the following reasons:


all non audit services have been reviewed by the Audit & Risk Committee to ensure they do not impact the impartiality and objectivity of the auditor; and



none of the services undermine the general principles relating to auditor independence as set out in APES 110
Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants.

During the year the following fees were paid or payable for services provided by the auditor of the Company, its related practices and non related audit firms:
2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

Audit and review

470

343

Other assurance services

155

21

Agreed upon procedures

217

-

Total remuneration of BDO Audit (WA) Pty Ltd

842

364

73

-

915

364

Audit services
BDO Audit (WA) Pty Ltd
Audit and other assurance services

Other services

Other audit firms
Audit and other assurance services
Audit of financial statements
Total auditors' remuneration

43

REMUNERATION REPORT
The Directors of Fortescue Metals Group Limited (the Company or Fortescue), in accordance with section 300A of the
Corporations Act 2001, present the Remuneration Report for year ended 30 June 2011. The information provided in the
Remuneration Report has been audited as required by section 308(3C) of the Corporations Act 2001 and forms part of the Directors’ Report.
The 2011 Remuneration Report is presented under the following sections:

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Section

What is covered

Remuneration Overview

44

The function of the Board and Remuneration and Nomination Committee, including the use of external remuneration consultants.

Page
15

The names and positions of non-executive directors, executive directors and other key management personnel whose remuneration is disclosed in the Annual Report.
Details of the major components of remuneration.

Remuneration Strategy

The structure and performance criteria of the Executive & Senior Staff
Incentive Plan and the performance objectives for 2011.

20

Examples of how objectives align to business goals and provide long-term shareholder protection.

Directors and KMP
Remuneration Outcomes

The names and positions of non-executive directors including the components of non-executive director remuneration (such as Board and
Committee fees).

24

Details of the actual remuneration received by executives and other key management personnel in 2011.
The contract terms of executives and other key management personnel.

Securities Trading Policy

Guidance on acceptable transactions in dealing in the Company’s various securities. 31

This remuneration report has been prepared in Australian dollars (A$). Whilst the functional and reporting currency of
Fortescue is US dollars, it is the Directors’ view that presentation of information in Australian dollars provides a more accurate and fair reflection of the remuneration practices of Fortescue, as all Directors, Executives and employees are remunerated in Australian dollars.

44

REMUNERATION REPORT
Remuneration Overview
The Board’s role in remuneration
The Board has established a Remuneration and Nomination Committee (R&NC) which operates in accordance with its charter as approved by the Board. The charter includes but is not limited to:
Executive remuneration policy;



Executive director and senior management remuneration;



Executive incentive plans;



Equity based plans; and



Recruitment, retention, performance management, succession planning and termination policies; and managing board nomination, including determining candidate criteria, addressing skills and experience requirements for Board position vacancies.

A copy of the charter is available under the Corporate Governance section of the Fortescue website.
The R&NC for financial year 2011 consisted of the following members:


Mr Herb Elliott as Chairman of Committee (Non-Executive, Lead Independent Director)



Mr Ken Ambrecht (Non-Executive, Independent Director)



Mr Ian Cumming (Non-Executive director)



Mr Andrew Forrest (Chief Executive Officer)



Mr Owen Hegarty (Non-Executive, Independent Director).

The Board has determined that from July 2011 membership of the R&NC will be exclusive to Non-Executive Directors.
The Chief Executive Officer and others may be invited to attend by the Committee Chairman, but will have no vote on matters before the Committee.
The R&NC has the authority to engage external remuneration advisors who do not provide advice to management and are considered to be independent. During the reporting period, the R&NC did not use the services of external remuneration advisors. Subsequent to the end of the 2011 financial year, Egan Associates have been appointed to advise the R&NC.
The R&NC met four times during the reporting period.

Non-executive director remuneration
At the Annual General Meeting of the Company on 19 November 2010, shareholders approved an increase from the previous annual aggregate cap of A$1,000,000 to A$2,000,000. This arose primarily from the requirement to appoint a number of additional non-executive directors, including directors sourced internationally.
The current fees are outlined in the table below:
Position

Fee (A$)

Board Chairman

250,000

Non-Executive Director

120,000

Audit Committee Chairman
Audit Committee Member

15,000
5,000

R&NC Chairman

10,000

R&NC Member

5,000

Finance Sub-Committee Member

4,000

45

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011



REMUNERATION REPORT
The table below sets out the Non-executive Directors’ aggregate emoluments compared to the market median for those companies ranked on the ASX between 5 and 25.
Name

Chairman

250,000

K Ambrecht

Director

120,000

5,000

M Barnaba

Director

120,000

5,000

G Brayshaw
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Base Fee

H Elliott
46

Position

Audit & Risk
Management
Committee

Remuneration
& Nominations
Committee

Aggregate
Fees

ASX market median 10,000*

260,000

589,583

5,000

130,000

239,774

125,000

239,744

Director

120,000

15,000*

135,000

239,744

I Burston

Director

120,000

5,000

125,000

239,744

I Cumming

Director

120,000

5,000

125,000

239,744

O Hegarty

Director

120,000

5,000

125,000

239,744

G Rowley

Director

120,000

120,000

239,744

L Xiaowei

Director

120,000

120,000

239,744

1,265,000

2,507,565

Total
* Chairman

Superannuation contributions on behalf of Directors, which as a minimum comply with superannuation guarantee legislation, are incorporated in the above aggregate fees.

Key Management Personnel (KMP)
KMP are those people having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly, including any Director (whether Executive or otherwise) of that entity. For the year ending
30 June 2011, the Executives listed were the KMP and among the five highest remunerated in the Company.
Executive Directors
A Forrest

Chief Executive Officer

R Scrimshaw

Executive Director Sales & Marketing

Executives
N Power

Chief Operating Officer

S Pearce

Chief Financial Officer

P Hallam

Director Operations

P Meurs

Director Development

W Ramsey

Director Projects

46

REMUNERATION REPORT
Executive remuneration structure
Executive remuneration has a fixed component and a variable at risk component, the payment of which is dependent on the achievement of Company performance and growth targets and individual objectives.
The details below describe the various components of remuneration at Fortescue:

Total Fixed Remuneration (TFR) is made up of base salary, cash allowances, employee benefits, superannuation and relevant taxes. The level of TFR is based on the Executive’s responsibilities, experience and qualifications and the market which prevails for similar roles in other leading ASX companies.

47

the Company and the participant achieving certain performance objectives during the reporting period. Participation in the ESSIP is by Board invitation on an annual financial year basis (the Plan Year) and that invitation will usually be extended to employees holding positions at the Director, General Manager and Group Manager levels. The ESSIP performance categories and weightings included:


Company Annual Performance (30 per cent), incorporates factors including production, cost and safety.



Company Growth Performance (20 per cent), incorporates factors including reserves conversion and earnings growth; •

Individual Performance (50 per cent). Performance criteria are tailored to the individual participant’s role and assessment is subject to manager once removed approval and audit. A detailed review of performance under each criteria for KMP is undertaken by the R&NC; and



For the 2011 Plan Year, the ESSIP required that 50 per cent of the award ultimately received by a participant would be in shares and 50 per cent would be payable in cash.

Salary Sacrifice Share Plan (SSSP) is a scheme to which Subdivision 83A-C of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997

applies (subject to the conditions of that Act). Employees and executives may nominate an amount of pre-tax salary, up to a maximum of A$5,000 per annum (to be deducted each pay in equal amounts), to acquire ordinary shares under the SSSP. Provided ordinary shares are kept in the SSSP, income tax on the acquisition of these ordinary shares can be deferred for up to seven years. As a condition of being able to defer the income tax on the ordinary shares, there are disposal restrictions while the shares remain in the SSSP.

Incentive Options Scheme (IOS) is designed to encourage participation by eligible employees through share

ownership and to attract, motivate and retain those employees. In the 2011 financial year, an award under this scheme was made to an Executive.
Traditionally at the discretion of the Board, offers have been made to eligible employees through an offer document which outlines the number of options, the issue date, exercise price and any exercise conditions (which may include performance related conditions). Options are issued for nil consideration and will generally vest in four tranches over a
48 month period. From time to time, the Board has made grants to KMP at their time of appointment in order to attract them to the Company, or in particular periods where their continued service was critical to the Group’s development.
Options issued in these circumstances have various performance and service conditions applied, relevant to the
Company’s needs at the time.
Changes to tax laws have diminished the attractiveness of the IOS as:


The assessed value of the options at the time of grant is taxable to the individual in that financial year;



That value is treated as an expense by the Company and amortised over the vesting period of the award.



In the event that the offer lapses, subject to the vesting conditions, the Company may not be entitled to reverse the prior expense value of the award; and



The leverage of options when the share price is mature is potentially modest.

It is the R&NC’s view that the attractiveness of options as a core element of management reward to assist, attract and motivate key staff has a lessened utility when compared to the ESSIP.
While the ESSIP is a performance focused incentive plan, with an emphasis on achieving key corporate objectives, it retains a focus on the individual participant’s position and contribution. The participant’s actual incentive award value, for the 50 per cent received in shares, is impacted by movement in the Company’s share price in the relevant financial year.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Executive & Senior Staff Incentive Plan (ESSIP) provides the ‘at risk’ component of remuneration and is based on

REMUNERATION REPORT
The R&NC is mindful that other leading mining companies in Australia, in addition to fixed remuneration and Short
Term Incentive (STI) plans, have long term equity based incentive plans. The R&NC keeps open the prospect of introducing a Long Term Incentive plan (LTI), but is presently of the view that the Company’s TFR levels and the ESSIP provide a competitive executive remuneration platform.
The R&NC considers that the above remuneration structure is generating the desired outcomes evidenced by:

48

High retention of employees, KMP and other executives; and



Fortescue’s record breaking progression from project to producer.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

In considering Fortescue’s performance and benefits for shareholder wealth, the Board have regard to the following indices in respect of the current financial year and the previous four financial years.
2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

Revenue from iron ore operations - US$'000

5,442,101

3,220,062

1,830,953

139,294

-

Net profit/(loss) - US$'000

1,022,555

580,946

508,042

(771,770)

(31,860)

Dividends paid

A$0.03

-

-

-

-

A$ Change in share price

A$2.23

A$0.43

A$(8.11)*

A$8.52*

A$2.43*

54%

12%

(68)%

252%

252%

% Change in share price

*Movements have been adjusted to provide reasonable comparative amounts in light of Fortescue’s reorganisation of capital in December 2007, whereby each fully paid ordinary share was split into ten fully paid ordinary shares.

48

REMUNERATION REPORT
Setting remuneration levels
Fortescue subscribes to a number of market-specific remuneration surveys in order to ensure that the remuneration paid to all employees and executives is relevant and competitive. Market data is sourced from McDonald & Company
Australasia, AON Hewitt and HayGroup and is used for benchmarking purposes.
The Company has engaged Egan Associates to provide advice to the Company on remuneration matters relating to
KMP and Non-Executive Directors. The consultant will not be permitted to provide advice directly to management of the Company. The advice will be provided directly to the R&NC or to one of the other Non-Executive Directors.

49

Remuneration consultants May be engaged directly by the Board or
Remuneration
and Nomination
Committee to provide advice or information relating to KMP that is free of influence of management. FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

The diagram below explains the process and accountabilities of the various areas within Fortescue in relation to setting remuneration: Board of Directors
Responsible for:

• Approving the remuneration of non-executive directors and the CEO; and
• Ensuring remuneration practices are competitive and align with the attraction and retention policies of the Company.

Remuneration and Nomination Committee
Advises the Board on:

• Remuneration policies and practices;
• Non-executive director remuneration; and
• Executive remuneration.

Human Resources Management
Responsible for:

• Implementation of remuneration policies and practices;
• Advising the Remuneration and Nomination Committee of changing statutory market conditions;
• Provides relevant information to the Remuneration and
Nomination Committee to assist with decisions.

Remuneration consultants Will be engaged directly by management other than in respect of
KMP to ensure
Fortescue’s
remuneration position remains competitive. REMUNERATION REPORT
Remuneration Strategy
Fortescue’s remuneration strategy is designed to build a performance oriented culture and attract, retain and motivate its employees, encouraging them to meet their full potential. In line with this strategy, Fortescue provides market competitive fixed remuneration and incentives.

50

The Company is increasingly mindful of its standing as the world’s fourth largest iron ore producer and explorer and its standing in the Australian Securities market, ranked in the top twenty listed companies. These circumstances and the global shortage of talent in the resources sector, remain key points of focus of the R&NC. Fortescue endeavours to provide market competitive remuneration and ‘at risk’ performance aligned reward in the form of an annual incentive program. FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

The remuneration strategy is based on the following principles:


Remuneration and reward will be competitive in the resources sector and for senior roles against leading ASX companies; •

High levels of employee share ownership will drive an alignment of employee and shareholder interests; and



Individual reward is directly linked to Company performance and shareholder interests.

The diagram below demonstrates how Fortescue’s remuneration practices align with its strategy:

Strategy
High levels of share ownership Market competitive remuneration Remuneration linked to performance of the
Company and individual

Practice
• 50% of the Executive & Senior Staff Incentive Plan is paid in shares*
• Incentive Options Scheme is designed to attract, motivate and retain key executives through share ownership
• Executive remuneration is benchmarked against the relevant market sector leading ASX companies
• Remuneration levels will attract and retain key executives
• 50% of the ESSIP is linked to company annual and growth performance measures • 50% of the ESSIP is linked to the personal performance objectives of the individual

* For the 2012 Plan Year, ESSIP participants may elect to take up to 100 per cent of any award in rights to ordinary shares.
The minimum amount to be taken in rights to ordinary shares will remain at 50 per cent, but can be increased in 10 per cent increments to 100 per cent.

The structure of the ESSIP
The purpose of the ESSIP is to reward key Fortescue management based on Company and individual performance against objectives that drive shareholder value. Linking 50 per cent of a key employee’s potential award under the ESSIP to Company objectives ensures that remuneration varies in line with the Company’s performance during the Plan Year.
The table below outlines the maximum possible payment* achievable under the ESSIP rules for the 2011 Plan Year:

50

Chief Executive Officer
Chief Operating Officer

150% of TFR

2 participants

Director Level Roles

100% of TFR

5 participants

General Manager Level Roles

75% of TFR

10 participants

Other

60% of TFR

26 participants

Total

43 participants

The 43 participants in the 2011 Plan Year represents approximately 1.5 per cent of the 2,889 employees eligible for incentive plan participation at 30 June 2011.

REMUNERATION REPORT
New senior managers commencing with the Company during a Plan Year are eligible to participate in the ESSIP based on the following conditions:


The senior manager must be employed prior to 1 April in the Plan Year; and



Any payment will be pro-rated based on the service start date.

Senior managers leaving during the Plan Year are not eligible to receive the ESSIP award, unless by specific R&NC approval. The ESSIP award is pro-rated based on service during the period and made at the usual payment date. If the person leaves after 30 June but prior to the payment date, the person remains eligible for any award.

51

* Note that the maximum possible value of awards under the ESSIP will be determined by the number of objectives achieved and the value of the Fortescue shares at time of granting.

Company Annual Performance

Weighting (per cent)

Production

Target tonnes shipped

10

Safety

Target percentage reduction in Classified Injury Frequency Rate (CIFR)^

10

Cost

Target cost per tonne shipped

10

Company Growth Performance
Physical

Target percentage of reserves mined are converted (after processing losses) to product.

10

Financial

Achieve target percentage of adjusted NPAT budget*

10

Individual Performance
4 objectives based on the business plan at 12.5 per cent each

50

^ CIFR includes fatalities, lost time injuries and restricted work injuries
* Where budget has been adjusted for the actual US$/A$ exchange rate (average over the year) and the actual CFR equivalent dry metric tonne unit price achieved by Fortescue on sales of each product. Actuals adjusted to include removal of the revaluation of the Leucadia note and other abnormals.
The Company Growth Performance category objectives are designed to protect the long term interests of the shareholder by preventing wastage of the resource and ensuring that budgeted financials are met.
The payment of any award under the ESSIP is made in September after the release of the Company’s audited results and with final approval from the Board. Amounts reflected in this report are therefore based on the performance of
Fortescue and the individual KMP performance for ESSIP awards which relate to the year ended 30 June 2011. The performance objectives are assessed and the award for each person is determined. Whatever the level of award, for the 2011 Plan Year, 50 per cent will be paid in cash and 50 per cent in ordinary shares. For example, a participant with a TFR of A$350,000 and a 60 per cent incentive rate has a potential award of A$210,000. If the award was paid in full,
A$105,000 would be in cash and A$105,000 applied to ordinary shares. A key feature of the ESSIP is that participants experience the same result as a Fortescue investor at the start of the financial year. In this case the ordinary share component of A$105,000 is divided by the volume weighted average price (VWAP) of Fortescue shares over the first five trading days in the applicable Plan Year. In July 2010 the relevant VWAP share price was A$4.08, which would result in the award of 25,735 ordinary shares. Ordinary shares which are awarded under the ESSIP have a taxable value based on the five day VWAP of the shares inclusive of the date the shares are granted (approved by the Board).
If using the same figures (TFR of A$350,000 and 60 per cent incentive rate) and for the sake of the example, assuming all the individual objectives were completed, but only three of the five company objectives were attained, an 80 per cent award would be made (A$168,000 of potential A$210,000). This would result in a cash payment of A$84,000 and an award of 20,588 shares.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

The table below describes the performance objectives of the ESSIP for the 2011 Plan Year and the weighting for each objective: REMUNERATION REPORT
The structure of the Staff Incentive Plan (SIP)
The SIP also operates under the auspices of the R&NC and applies to permanent Fortescue employees. Similar to the
ESSIP, the purpose of the SIP is to reward Fortescue employees based on Company and business unit performance against annual objectives. Manager and Superintendent level employees have personal objectives, but the SIP is predominantly based on Company and business unit objectives.

52

To further encourage share ownership, those employees who elect to have their award in Fortescue shares, will have their incentive increased by 50 per cent of the awarded amount. The SIP does not provide the ability to allocate between cash and shares. Shares are issued at the five day VWAP at the time of issue and are subject to a 12 month escrow period from the date of issue.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

The table below outlines the maximum possible awards achievable under the SIP rules for the 2011 Plan Year:
Manager level

30% of TFR if cash
45% of TFR if shares

86 participants

Superintendent level

20% of TFR if cash
30% of TFR if shares

121 participants

All other employees

15% of TFR if cash
22.5% of TFR if shares

2,639 participants

Total

2,846 participants

The table below outlines the cash structure and weightings for each objective under the SIP rules for the 2011 Plan Year:
Employee Group

Company Objectives
As per ESSIP Annual
Performance category

Business Unit
Objectives

Personal Objectives

Total

4 objectives

3-4 objectives

Manager level

5%

10%

15%

30%

Superintendent level

5%

10%

5%

20%

All other employees

5%

10%

n/a

15%

While the Company over recent years has experienced share price growth well above the index and its peer ASX top
50 companies, due to the rigour of its annual incentive program and the hurdles set by the Board, the conditions for incentive awards have not been met in a number of years. Accordingly, senior management, including KMPs, have not fully received their incentive in the majority of the last five years. However, when the Company’s performance has exceeded Directors’ expectations appropriate rewards have been made.

52

REMUNERATION REPORT
Remuneration mix
The table below demonstrates the remuneration mix for Fortescue’s KMP for the year ending 30 June 2011:
100%

LTI

11%

90%

11%

80%
70%

STI

60%

44%

60%

50%

44%

60%

74%

77%

53

50%
40%
30%
20%

40%

45%

40%

50%

45%

10%

13%
23%

13%

0%

Andrew
Forrest

Russell
Scrimshaw

Neville
Power

Stephen
Pearce

Paul
Hallam

Peter
Meurs

William
Ramsey

..
The numbers of performance rights to shares granted under the ESSIP for the 2011 Plan Year are listed below. Based on the achievement of all the objectives in the Company Annual Performance, Company Growth Performance and
Individual Performance categories, the rights will convert to ordinary shares.
Executive
A Forrest

Performance Rights Issued
20,221

R Scrimshaw

122,550

N Power

123,627

S Pearce

122,550

P Hallam

122,550

P Meurs

122,550

W Ramsey

55,148

Based on the likely achievement of the objectives in the Company Annual Performance, Company Growth Performance and Individual Performance categories of the ESSIP, the number of rights which will convert to ordinary shares in respect of the year ended 30 June 2011 are listed below:
Executive

Performance Rights to convert shares

A Forrest

14,154

R Scrimshaw

85,784

N Power

86,538

S Pearce

85,784

P Hallam

78,125

P Meurs

85,784

W Ramsey (ineligible)

0

12

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Percentage of total reward

Fixed

REMUNERATION REPORT
Directors and KMP Remuneration Outcomes

54

The R&NC have obtained independent advice from Egan Associates in relation to the KMPs. Information provided by
Egan Associates reveals that directors’ emoluments are modest by market comparison and that (exclusive of Andrew
Forrest) executive remuneration incorporating fixed remuneration and incentives, both cash and equity, place executives generally in the third quartile of the market, though well below the top quartile. The exception to this circumstance is Peter Meurs where the allocation of options at the time of his appointment and in compliance with accounting standards reveals a substantial notional benefit of that allocation.
The table below sets out the remuneration paid to Directors and KMP for year ending 30 June 2011:

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

2011

Short-term employee benefits
Cash salary and fees

$AUD

ESSIP cash value for
2011 plan year $AUD

1

Post
End of
Share-based payments employment service benefits NonSuperAccrued 2ESSIP share
Options3
monetary annuation leave value for benefits entitlements
2011 plan year ahead
$AUD
$AUD
$AUD
$AUD
$AUD

Total

$AUD

Non-executive directors
H Elliott

240,530

-

-

24,053

-

-

-

264,583

G Rowley

109,091

-

-

10,909

-

-

-

120,000

G Brayshaw

126,363

-

-

12,637

-

-

-

139,000

K Ambrecht

134,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

134,000

I Burston

125,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

125,000

O Hegarty

113,636

-

-

11,364

-

-

-

125,000

L Xiaowei

120,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

120,000

M Barnaba

113,106

-

-

11,309

-

-

-

124,415

I Cumming4

166,667

-

-

-

-

-

-

166,667

Executive directors
A Forrest5

100,000

57,750

167,638

10,000

-

91,154

-

426,542

R Scrimshaw

948,833

350,000

-

50,000

236,236

552,451

241,399

2,378,919

-

1,625,627

Other key management personnel of the Company
N Power6

647,855

353,077

2,602

64,785

-

557,308

S Pearce

968,000

350,000

7,000

25,000

-

552,451

-

1,902,451

P Hallam

947,167

318,750

7,000

50,000

-

503,125

241,399

2,067,441

P Meurs

950,000

350,000

3,649

50,000

-

552,451

5,818,028

7,724,128

W Ramsey7

408,739

-

5,269

41,825

17,743

1,570,703

-

2,044,279

1

ESSIP cash value is 50 per cent of the estimated award.

ESSIP share value for 2011 Plan Year is 50 per cent of the estimated total award divided by the VWAP of Fortescue shares for the first five trading days of the Plan Year (A$4.08) multiplied by the five day VWAP of Fortescue shares up to and inclusive of
1 July 2011 (A$6.44).
2

54

The fair value of options is determined at grant date using either a binomial or trinomial lattice option pricing model that takes into account the exercise price, the term of the option, the impact of dilution, the share price at grant date and expected price volatility of the underlying share, the effect of additional market conditions, the expected dividend yield and the risk free interest rate for the term of the option.
3

Mr. Cumming had not previously received remuneration for his Board membership prior to 1 March 2010. Payment for the four month period ending on 30 June 2010 was made in the 2011 Financial year.
4

Non-monetary benefits include occasional private use of the Company aircraft taking into account the individual’s contribution towards this usage.
5

6

Mr. Power was appointed on 14 February 2011.

Mr. Ramsey is not entitled to participate in the 2011 ESSIP due to his resignation on 1 April 2011. The amount reported in
ESSIP share value relates to a project completion incentive made to Mr. Ramsey in May 2011.
7

REMUNERATION REPORT
The table below sets out the remuneration paid to Directors and KMP for year ending 30 June 2010. The table has been amended to reflect the conversion to $AUD using an average rate of $0.8821:
2010

Short-term employee benefits
Cash salary and fees
$AUD

Short-term incentive 1

$AUD

Post
End of employment service benefits NonSuperAccrued monetary annuation leave benefits entitlements $AUD
$AUD
$AUD

Share-based payments
Short-term
incentive

Options7

$AUD

$AUD

Total

2

$AUD

55

Non-executive directors
185,628

-

-

45,229

-

-

-

230,857

G Rowley

671,787

184,002

17,249

58,074

-

143,879

-

1,074,991

G Brayshaw

98,489

-

-

9,848

-

-

-

108,338

K Ambrecht

99,337

-

-

-

-

-

-

99,337

I Burston

97,671

-

-

-

-

-

-

97,671

O Hegarty

88,791

-

-

8,879

-

-

-

97,671

L Xiaowei

97,336

-

-

-

-

-

-

97,336

M Barnaba3

38,044

-

-

3,805

-

-

-

41,848

I Cumming4

52,085

-

-

-

-

-

-

52,085

Executive directors
A Forrest

100,004

78,949

7,637

11,364

-

84,106

-

282,060

R Scrimshaw

741,316

386,519

-

53,714

-

404,671

241,399

1,827,616

Other key management personnel of the Company
S Pearce5

258,343

127,927

2,910

8,334

-

164,740

-

562,254

P Hallam

693,903

385,468

61,423

44,993

-

391,025

241,399

1,818,211

P Meurs6

131,226

-

-

4,167

-

-

765,111

900,504

W Ramsey

472,744

224,995

-

62,275

-

198,428

-

958,442

Includes the actual amounts of FY10 ESSIP cash payments awarded in September 2010 together with a one-off discretionary bonus awarded in August 2009 to all Fortescue staff.
1

2

Includes the actual amounts of FY10 ESSIP equity payments (taxable value) awarded in September 2010.

3

Mr. Barnaba was appointed on 19 February 2010.

4

Mr. Cumming was appointed on 28 August 2009.

5

Mr. Pearce was appointed on 2 March 2010.

6

Mr. Meurs was appointed on 13 May 2010.

The fair value of options is determined at grant date using either a binomial or trinomial lattice option pricing model that takes into account the exercise price, the term of the option, the impact of dilution, the share price at grant date and expected price volatility of the underlying share, the effect of additional market conditions, the expected dividend yield and the risk free interest rate for the term of the option.
7

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

H Elliott

REMUNERATION REPORT
Share-based remuneration
All options refer to options over ordinary shares of the Company, which are exercisable on a one for one basis under the IOS.
The terms and conditions of each grant of options affecting remuneration of each Director, KMP and other executives in the current or future reporting periods are set out below.

56

Options granted under the plan carry no dividend or voting rights. When exercisable, each option is convertible into one ordinary share.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Options over equity instruments granted as remuneration
Details of options over ordinary shares in the Company that were granted as remuneration to each Director, KMP and other executives of the Company and Fortescue are set out below. When exercisable, each option is convertible into one ordinary share of Fortescue Metals Group Limited.
Number of options granted
Name

Number of options vested during

2011

2010

2011

2010

-

-

150,000
-

150,000
-

-

7,500,000
-

150,000
2,187,500
-

150,000
-

Directors of Fortescue Metals Group Limited
A Forrest
R Scrimshaw
H Elliott
G Rowley
K Ambrecht
G Brayshaw
L Xiaowei
M Barnaba
I Cumming
O Hegarty
I Burston
Other key management personnel of the Company
S Pearce
P Hallam
P Meurs
W Ramsey
N Power

The options were provided at no cost to the recipients. All options expire on the earlier of their expiry date or termination of the individual’s employment. Once performance hurdles are met the options are exercisable evenly on an annual basis over the four years from grant date.
The assessed fair value at grant date of options granted to individuals is allocated equally over the period from grant date to vesting date, and the amount is included in the remuneration tables above. The fair values at grant date are determined using the trinomial lattice or binomial option pricing models that take into account the exercise price, the term of the option, the impact of dilution, the share price at grant date, expected price volatility of the underlying share, the effect of additional market conditions, the expected dividend yield and the risk free interest rate for the term of the option. 56

REMUNERATION REPORT
Modifications of terms of equity settled share-based payment transactions
No terms of equity settled share based payment transactions (including options granted as remuneration to a key management person) have been altered or modified by the Company during the financial year ended 30 June 2011.

Exercise of options granted as remuneration
Details of ordinary shares in the Company provided as a result of the exercise of options to each Director of Fortescue
Metals Group Limited, other Key Management Personnel and other executives of Fortescue are set out below.
Date of exercise of options Number of ordinary shares issued on exercise of options during the year

Amount paid per share

-

-

-

5 November 2010
-

150,000
-

2.50
-

A$

Directors of Fortescue Metals Group Limited
A Forrest
R Scrimshaw
H Elliott
G Rowley
K Ambrecht
G Brayshaw
L Xiaowei
M Barnaba
I Cumming
O Hegarty
I Burston
Other key management personnel of the Company
S Pearce
P Hallam
P Meurs
W Ramsey
N Power

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Name

57

REMUNERATION REPORT
Additional information - details of remuneration - 2011 cash incentives and options

58

For each incentive scheme and grant of options included in the tables on pages 54 and 55, the percentage of the available incentive or grant that was paid or payable, or that vested, in the financial year, and the percentage that was forfeited because the person did not meet the service and performance criteria is set out below. The incentives recognised in the 2011 financial year are payable in the 2012 financial year. The options were issued pursuant to the
IOS and may be exercised over a three to four year period. No options will vest if conditions are not satisfied, hence the minimum value of the option yet to vest is nil. The maximum value of the options that is yet to vest has been determined as the amount of the grant date fair value of the options that is yet to be expensed. Further information on options is set out in note 36 to the financial statements.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Name

ESSIP bonus cash and shares percentage of maximum possible payment achieved Number

Share-based compensation benefits (options)
Financial Vested in a Forfeited in
Financial
Minimum
Maximum
year granted year a year years in total value total value of which of grant yet grant yet to options may to vest vest vest
%
%
$A
$A

Directors of Fortescue Metals Group Limited
A Forrest

70%

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

R Scrimshaw

70%

600,000

2009

25%

-

2012 - 2013

-

390,868

H Elliott

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

G Rowley

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

K Ambrecht

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

G Brayshaw

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

L Xiaowei

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

M Barnaba

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

I Cumming

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

O Hegarty

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

I Burston

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Other key management personnel of the Company
S Pearce

70%

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

P Hallam

64%

600,000

2009

25%

-

2012 - 2013

-

390,868

P Meurs

70%

7,500,000

2010

29%

-

2013 - 2014

-

13,362,624

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

70%

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

W Ramsey
N Power

58

REMUNERATION REPORT
Name

A
Remuneration
consisting of options %

B
Granted in a year

C
Value of options excercised in a year

D
Lapsed in a year

A$

A$

A$

10%
-

-

-

-

12%
75%
-

-

648,000
-

-

Directors of Fortescue Metals Group Limited
R Scrimshaw
H Elliott
G Rowley
K Ambrecht
G Brayshaw
L Xiaowei
M Barnaba
I Cumming
O Hegarty
I Burston
Other key management personnel of the Company
S Pearce
P Hallam
P Meurs
W Ramsey
N Power

A - The percentage of the value of remuneration consisting of options, based on the value of options expensed during the current year.
B - The value at the grant date calculated in accordance with AASB 2 Share-based Payment of options granted.
C - The value at exercise date of options that were granted as part of remuneration and were exercised during the year, being the intrinsic value of the options at that date.
D - The value at lapse date of options that were granted as part of remuneration and that lapsed during the year because a vesting condition was not satisfied. The value is determined at the time of lapsing, but assuming the condition was satisfied.

59

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

A Forrest

REMUNERATION REPORT
Service agreements
Remuneration and other terms of employment for the Executive Directors and KMP are formalised in a service agreement. The major provisions of the agreements relating to remuneration are set out in the table below:
Position

Executive

Chief Executive Officer

60

Terms of agreement

Mr Andrew Forrest

1

Total Fixed Remuneration for the year ended 30 June 2011 of A$110,000 which is to be reviewed annually by the R&NC.
ESSIP participating percentage 150 per cent.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Three month termination clause.
Chief Operating Officer

Mr Neville Power2

Total Fixed Remuneration for the year ended 30 June 2011 of
A$1,800,000 which is to be reviewed annually by the R&NC.
ESSIP participating percentage 150 per cent.
Three month termination clause.

Chief Financial Officer

Mr Stephen Pearce

Total Fixed Remuneration for the year ended 30 June 2011 of
A$1,000,000 which is to be reviewed annually by the R&NC.
ESSIP participating percentage 100 per cent.
Three month termination clause.

Executive Director Sales and Marketing

Mr Russell Scrimshaw3

Total Fixed Remuneration for the year ended 30 June 2011 of
A$1,000,000 which is to be reviewed annually by the R&NC.
ESSIP participating percentage 100 per cent.
One month termination clause.

Director Operations

Mr Paul Hallam4

Total Fixed Remuneration for the year ended 30 June 2011 of
A$1,000,000 which is to be reviewed annually by the R&NC.
ESSIP participating percentage 100 per cent.
Three month termination clause.

Director Development

Mr Peter Meurs

Total Fixed Remuneration for the year ended 30 June 2011 of
A$1,000,000 which is to be reviewed annually by the R&NC.
ESSIP participating percentage 100 per cent.
Three month termination clause.

Director Projects

Mr William Ramsey5

Total Fixed Remuneration for the year ended 30 June 2011 of A$600,000 which is to be reviewed annually by the R&NC.
ESSIP participating percentage 75 per cent.

60

One month termination clause.
Mr Forrest resigned from his position of Chief Executive Officer on 18 July 2011 and will assume the role of Chairman effective from 18 August 2011.
1

Mr Power assumed the role of Chief Executive Officer effective 18 July 2011. Prior to this Mr Power held the position of Chief
Operating Officer.
2

Mr Scrimshaw resigned as an Executive Director effective 30 June 2011. He will continue to act in a Non Executive Director capacity. 3

4

Mr Hallam announced his resignation from Fortescue effective from 2 September 2011.

5

Mr Ramsey resigned from Fortescue effective from 1 April 2011.

REMUNERATION REPORT
Securities Trading Policy
Fortescue’s Security Trading Policy provides guidance on acceptable transactions in dealing in the Company’s various securities, including shares, debt notes and options. Fortescue’s Security Trading Policy defines dealing in company securities to include:
Subscribing for, purchasing or selling Company Securities or entering into an agreement to do any of those things; •

Advising, procuring or encouraging another person (including a family member, friend, associate, colleague, family company or family trust) to trade in Company Securities; and



Entering into agreements or transactions which operate to limit the economic risk of a person’s holdings in
Company Securities.

The Securities Trading Policy details acceptable and unacceptable periods for trading in Company Securities including detailing potential civil and criminal penalties for misuse of confidential information.
The Directors must not deal in Company Securities without providing written notification to the Chairman. The
Chairman must not deal in Company Securities without the prior approval of the Chief Executive Officer. The Directors are responsible for disclosure to the market of all transactions or contracts involving the Company’s shares.
The Company’s Security Trading Policy can be accessed from the Corporate Governance section of the Fortescue website. This is the end of the audited Remuneration Report.

61

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011



DIRECTORS’ REPORT
Auditor’s Independence Declaration
A copy of the Auditor’s Independence Declaration as required under section 307C of the Corporations Act 2001 is set out on the next page.

Rounding of amounts
62

Fortescue is of the kind referred to in ASIC Class Order 98/100, issued by the Australian Securities and Investments
Commission, relating to the rounding off of amounts. Amounts in the financial report and Directors’ Report have been rounded off in accordance with that Class Order to the nearest thousand dollars, or in certain cases, to the nearest dollar.

Auditor
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

BDO Audit (WA) Pty Ltd continues in office in accordance with section 327 of the Corporations Act 2001.
This report is made in accordance with a resolution of Directors.

Mr Andrew Forrest
Chairman
Dated at Perth this 19th day of August 2011.

62

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

AUDITOR’S INDEPENDENCE DECLARATION

63

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Contents
65
66

Balance sheet

67

Statement of changes in equity

68

Statement of cash flows

69

64

Statement of comprehensive income

Notes to the financial statements
Directors’ Declaration

121
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

120

Independent Auditor’s report to the Members

64

STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
2011

2010

Notes

US$'000

US$'000

Operating sales revenue

5

5,442,102

3,220,062

Cost of sales

7

(2,757,586)

(2,125,552)

2,684,516

1,094,510

Gross profit
6

49,981

65,176

Administration expenses

7

(96,724)

(24,705)

2,637,773

1,134,981

20(f )

(92,846)

(279,986)

(60,960)

99,487

Refinancing costs

7

(719,201)

-

Net finance expenses

7

(429,698)

(375,306)

1,335,068

579,176

(312,513)

1,770

Profit for the year after income tax

1,022,555

580,946

Profit for the year

1,022,555

580,946

62

68

1,022,617

581,014

Cents

Cents

Operating profit
Re-estimation of unsecured loan notes
Net foreign exchange (loss)/gain

Profit before income tax
Income tax (expense)/benefit

8

Other comprehensive income
Revaluation of available for sale financial assets

25(a)

Total comprehensive income for the year
Earnings per share for profit attributable to the ordinary equity holders of the parent entity:
Basic earnings per share

35

32.86

18.85

Diluted earnings per share

35

32.83

18.82

The above statement of comprehensive income should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

65

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Other income

BALANCE SHEET
2011

2010

Notes

US$'000

US$'000

Cash and cash equivalents

9

2,662,719

1,235,538

Trade and other receivables

10

399,731

212,256

Inventories

12

416,538

188,291

Other current assets

15,238

8,976

Total current assets

3,494,226

1,645,061

Assets
Current assets

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

66

Non-current assets
Trade and other receivables

11

16,960

3,878

Property, plant and equipment

13

1,670,939

1,364,103

Exploration, evaluation and development expenditure

14

3,422,426

2,089,308

Intangible assets

15

21,315

22,750

Deferred tax assets

16

-

121,965

Total non-current assets

5,131,640

3,602,004

Total assets

8,625,866

5,247,065

Liabilities
Current Liabilities
Trade and other payables

17

812,610

442,480

Borrowings

19

197,146

227,154

Derivatives held at fair value

21

Other financial liabilities
Total current liabilities

16,285
-

17,153

12,844

1,117,528

23

90,619

Current tax payable

698,763

Non-current liabilities
Trade and other payables

18

184,424

265,615

Borrowings

20

4,465,230

2,748,509

Other financial liabilities

23

192,637

479

Provisions

22

132,113

57,034

Deferred tax liabilities

16

66

99,631

-

Total non-current liabilities

5,074,035

3,071,637

Total liabilities

6,191,563

3,770,400

Net assets

2,434,303

1,476,665

1,295,033

1,274,650

13,338

(74,369)

1,125,932

276,384

2,434,303

1,476,665

Equity
Contributed equity
Reserves
Retained earnings
Total equity attributable to holders of Fortescue Metals Group Limited
The above balance sheet should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

24
25(a)

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
Contributed
equity

Total comprehensive income for the year

Foreign currency translation reserve Share-based payments reserve

Hedging reserve Retained earnings Total equity US$'000
Balance at 1 July 2009

Asset revaluation reserve

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

1,229,876

610

(77,202)

1,970

-

(304,562)

850,692

-

68

-

-

-

580,946

581,014

67

Transactions with owners in their capacity as owners:
40,977

-

-

-

-

-

40,977

3,797

-

-

(1,586)

-

-

2,211

Forfeited options

-

-

-

(456)

-

-

(456)

Equity settled share-based payments transactions

-

-

-

2,227

-

-

2,227

Balance at 30 June 2010

1,274,650

678

(77,202)

2,155

-

276,384 1,476,665

Balance at 1 July 2010

1,274,650

678

(77,202)

2,155

-

276,384 1,476,665

-

62

-

-

-

1,022,555

1,022,617

Exercise of options

Total comprehensive income for the year

Transactions with owners in their capacity as owners:
Issue of share capital

17,523

-

-

-

-

-

17,523

-

-

77,202

-

-

(77,202)

-

2,860

-

-

(1,045)

-

-

1,815

Forfeited options

-

-

-

(15)

-

15

-

Equity settled share-based payments transactions

-

-

-

8,066

-

-

8,066

Effective portion of changes in fair value of cash flow hedges -

-

-

-

15,026

-

15,026

Net change in fair value of cash flow hedges recognised as part of non-financial assets -

-

-

-

(11,589)

-

(11,589)

Dividends paid

-

-

-

-

-

(95,820)

(95,820)

1,295,033

740

-

9,161

Transfer resulting from change in tax functional currency Exercise of options

Balance at 30 June 2011

3,437 1,125,932 2,434,303

Amounts are stated net of taxation. Refer to note 24(b) for description of movements in share capital and note 25 for the description of the reserves.
The above statements of changes in equity should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Issue of share capital

STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

5,404,859

3,341,632

(2,626,697)

(2,047,498)

2,778,162

1,294,134

(1,428,203)

(583,829)

Payment of deposits and guarantees

(36,123)

(27,734)

Contributions to joint ventures

(48,764)

-

9,981

28,407

22,201

18,909

(1,480,908)

(564,247)

1,815

2,223

Proceeds from borrowings

3,450,386

-

Repayment of borrowings

(2,009,120)

(5,661)

(668,353)

-

(12,202)

-

(464,147)

(205,498)

(11,840)

-

Proceeds from customer deposits

-

30,000

Repayment of customer deposits

(117,800)

(10,000)

(95,820)

-

72,919

(188,936)

1,370,173

540,951

1,235,538

654,942

57,008

39,645

2,662,719

1,235,538

Notes
Cash flows from operating activities
Cash receipts from customers
Payments to suppliers and employees
68

Net cash inflow from operating activities

38

Cash flows from investing activities

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Payments for exploration, evaluation and development expenditure

Proceeds from disposal of plant and equipment
Interest received
Net cash outflow from investing activities
Cash flows from financing activities
Proceeds from the issue of share capital

Premium on buy back of senior secured notes
Syndicated loan facility establishment fee
Interest and finance costs paid
Settlement of derivative held at fair value

Dividends paid
Net cash inflow/ (outflow) from financing activities
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the financial year
Effects of exchange rate changes in cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the year

9

The above statement of cash flows should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

68

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Contents of the notes to the financial statements
Note 1. Summary of significant accounting policies

82

Note 2. Critical accounting estimates and judgements

84

Note 3. Financial risk management

91

Note 4. Segment information

91

Note 5. Operating sales revenue

91

Note 6. Other income

92

Note 7. Expenses

93

Note 8. Income tax expense

94

Note 9. Cash and cash equivalents

94

Note 10. Trade and other receivables - current

95

Note 11. Trade and other receivables - non-current

95

Note 12. Inventories

96

Note 13. Property, plant and equipment

97

Note 14. Exploration, evaluation and development expenditure

98

Note 15. Intangible assets

98

Note 16. Deferred taxes

99

Note 17. Trade and other payables - current

99

Note 18. Trade and other payables - non-current

100

Note 19. Borrowings - current

100

Note 20. Borrowings - non-current

103

Note 21. Derivatives held at fair value

104

Note 22. Provisions

104

Note 23. Other financial liabilities

105

Note 24. Contributed equity

106

Note 25. Reserves

107

Note 26. Dividends

107

Note 27. Key management personnel

110

Note 28. Remuneration of auditors

110

Note 29. Contingent liabilities

111

Note 30. Commitments

112

Note 31. Related party transactions

113

Note 32. Subsidiaries

114

Note 33. Deed of cross guarantee

115

Note 34. Interests in joint ventures

116

Note 35. Earnings per share

116

Note 36. Share-based payments

118

Note 37. Parent entity financial information

119

Note 38. Reconciliation of profit after income tax to net cash inflow from operating activities

119

Note 39. Subsequent events

69

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

70

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 1. Summary of significant accounting policies
The principal accounting policies adopted in the preparation of these consolidated financial statements are set out below. These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless otherwise stated. These financial statements cover the consolidated group consisting of Fortescue Metals Group Limited (the Company) and its subsidiaries, together referred to as Fortescue or the Group.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

70

(a) Basis of preparation
These general purpose financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards, other authoritative pronouncements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB), including Australian
Interpretations, and the Corporations Act 2001.

(i) Compliance with IFRS

The consolidated financial statements of the Group also comply with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB).

(ii) Historical cost convention

These financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention, as modified by the revaluation of available for sale financial assets measured at fair value and derivative financial instruments accounted for at fair value through profit or loss.

(iii) Functional and presentation currency

The financial statements are presented in United States dollars, unless otherwise stated, which is the Group’s functional and presentation currency.

(iv) Critical accounting estimates

The preparation of financial statements requires the management to use certain critical accounting estimates and to exercise their judgement in the process of applying the Group’s accounting policies. The areas involving a higher degree of judgement or complexity, or areas where assumptions and estimates are significant to the financial statements, are disclosed in note 2.

(v) Rounding of amounts

The Company is of a kind referred to in Class order 98/100, issued by the Australian Securities and Investments
Commission, relating to the “rounding off” of amounts in the financial report. Amounts in the financial report have been rounded off in accordance with that Class Order to the nearest thousand dollars, unless otherwise stated.

(b) Principles of consolidation
The consolidated financial statements incorporate the financial statements of the Company and entities controlled by the Company. Control is achieved when the Company has the power to govern the financial and operating policies of an entity so as to obtain benefits from its activities.
Income and expenses of subsidiaries acquired or disposed of during the year are included in the consolidated statement of comprehensive income from the effective date of acquisition and up to the effective date of disposal, as appropriate.
The financial statements of subsidiaries are prepared for the same reporting period as the Company, using consistent accounting policies. All intercompany balances and transactions, including unrealised profits and losses arising from intra-group transactions, have been eliminated in full.
The acquisition method of accounting is used to account for the acquisition of subsidiaries by the Company.

70

(c) Joint ventures - jointly controlled assets
The Group undertakes a number of business activities through joint ventures. Joint ventures are established through contractual arrangements that require the unanimous consent of each of the venturers regarding the strategic financial and operating policies of the venture (joint control).
When a Group entity undertakes its activities under joint venture arrangements directly, the Group’s share of jointly controlled assets and liabilities incurred jointly with other venturers are recognised in the financial statements of the relevant entity and classified according to their nature. Liabilities and expenses incurred directly in respect of interests in jointly controlled assets are accounted for on an accruals basis. Income from the sale or use of the Group’s share of the output of jointly controlled assets, and its share of joint venture expenses, are recognised when it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the transactions will flow to or from the Group and the amount can be measured reliably. All such amounts are measured in accordance with the terms of each agreement, which is usually in proportion to the Group’s interest in the jointly controlled assets.

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 1. Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)
The transactions, balances and unrealised gains on transactions between the Group and joint ventures are eliminated to the extent of the Group’s ownership interest.

(d) Segment reporting
Operating segments are reported in a manner consistent with the internal reporting provided to the chief operating decision maker. The chief operating decision maker, who is responsible for allocating resources and assessing performance of the operating segments, has been identified as the Chief Executive Officer.

71

(e) Foreign currency translation
Items included in the financial statements of each of Fortescue’s entities are measured using the currency of the primary economic environment in which the entity operates (the functional currency). For the purpose of the consolidated financial statements, the results and the financial position of each Group entity are expressed in United States dollars, which is the Group’s functional currency and the presentation currency for the consolidated financial statements.

(ii) Transactions and balances

Transactions in foreign currencies have been converted at rates of exchange ruling at the date of those transactions.
Foreign exchange gains and losses resulting from the settlement of such transactions and from the year-end translation of monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are recognised in profit or loss, except when they are deferred in other comprehensive income as qualifying cash flow hedges. Translation differences on assets and liabilities carried at fair value are reported as part of the fair value gain or loss.

(iii) Foreign operations

The results and financial position of all Fortescue entities (none of which has the currency of a hyperinflationary economy) that have a functional currency different from the presentation currency are translated into the presentation currency as follows:


assets and liabilities are translated at the closing foreign exchange rate at the date of the balance sheet;



income and expense items are translated at average exchange rates for the periods presented (unless exchange rates fluctuated significantly during the period, in which case the exchange rates at the dates of the transactions are used); and



all resulting exchange differences are recognised in other comprehensive income and accumulated in equity.

On consolidation, exchange differences arising from the translation of any net investment in foreign entities, and of borrowings designated as hedges of the investment, are recognised in other comprehensive income. When a foreign operation is sold or any borrowings forming part of the net investment are repaid, a proportionate share of the exchange difference is reclassified to profit or loss, as part of the gain or loss on sale where applicable.
Goodwill and fair value adjustments arising on the acquisition of a foreign operation are treated as assets and liabilities of the foreign operation and translated at the closing rate.

(f) Revenue recognition
Revenue is measured at the fair value of the gross consideration received or receivable. Fortescue recognises revenue when the amount of revenue can be reliably measured and it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to the entity. The amount of revenue is not considered to be reliably measurable until all contingencies relating to the sale have been resolved. Fortescue bases its estimates on historical results, taking into consideration the type of customer, the type of transaction and the specific details of each arrangement.

(i) Sale of goods

Revenue from the sale of goods and disposal of other assets is recognised when persuasive evidence, usually in the form of an executed sales agreement, or an arrangement exists, indicating that there has been a transfer of risks and rewards of ownership to the customer, no further work or processing is required by the Group, the quantity and quality of the goods has been determined with reasonable accuracy, the price can be reasonably estimated and collectability is reasonably assured.
Fortescue recognises revenue from the sale of iron ore when the risks and rewards of ownership transfers to the buyer which is typically the bill of lading date. The majority of Fortescue’s executed sales agreements allow for an adjustment to the sales price based on a survey of the iron ore shipment by the customer, therefore the recognition of the sales revenue is based on the most recently determined estimate of product specifications.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

(i) Functional and presentation currency

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 1. Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)
Additionally, the sales price is determined on a provisional basis at the date of sale and adjustments to the sales price may subsequently occur depending on movements in quoted market or contractual iron ore prices to the date of final pricing. The date of final pricing is typically when a notice of readiness is received when the vessel has arrived at its final destination. Revenue on provisionally priced sales is recognised based on the estimated fair value of the total consideration receivable.
72

(ii) Services revenue

Revenue from the provision of services is recognised in the accounting period in which the services are rendered.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

(iii) Interest income

Interest income is recognised when it is probable that the economic benefits will flow to the Group and the amount of revenue can be measured reliably. Interest income is accrued using the effective interest rate method.

(g) Income tax
The income tax expense or revenue for the period is the tax payable on the current period’s taxable income based on the applicable income tax rate for each jurisdiction adjusted by changes in deferred tax assets and liabilities attributable to temporary differences and to unused tax losses.
The current income tax charge is calculated on the basis of the taxation laws enacted or substantively enacted at the end of the reporting period in the countries where the company’s subsidiaries operate and generate taxable income.
Management periodically evaluates positions taken in tax returns with respect to situations in which the applicable tax regulation is subject to interpretation. It establishes provisions where appropriate on the basis of amounts expected to be paid to the taxation authorities.
Deferred income tax is provided in full, using the liability method, on temporary differences arising between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their carrying amounts. However, the deferred income tax is not accounted for if it arises from initial recognition of an asset or liability in a transaction other than a business combination that at the time of the transaction affects neither the accounting nor taxable profit or loss. Deferred income tax is determined using tax rates (and laws) that have been enacted or substantially enacted by the reporting date and are expected to apply when the related deferred income tax asset is realised or the deferred income tax liability is settled.
Deferred tax assets are recognised for deductible temporary differences and unused tax losses only if it is probable that future taxable amounts will be available to utilise those temporary differences and losses.
Deferred tax assets are reviewed at each reporting date and are reduced to the extent that it is no longer probable that the related tax benefit will be realised.
Deferred tax liabilities and assets are not recognised for temporary differences between the carrying amounts and tax bases of investments in foreign operations where the Group is able to control the timing of the reversal of the temporary differences and it is probable that the differences will not reverse in the foreseeable future.
Deferred tax assets and liabilities are offset when there is a legal right to offset current tax assets and liabilities and when the deferred tax balances relate to the same taxation authority. Current tax assets and tax liabilities are offset where the
Group has a legally enforceable right to offset and intends either to settle on a net basis, or to realise the asset and settle the liability simultaneously.
Current and deferred tax balances attributable to amounts recognised directly in equity are also recognised directly in equity. 72

Fortescue has implemented the tax consolidation legislation as of 1 July 2002 and is therefore taxed as a single entity from that date.
The head entity, Fortescue Metals Group Limited and the controlled entities in the tax consolidated group continue to account for their own current and deferred tax amounts. These tax amounts are measured as if each entity in the tax consolidated group continues to be a standalone taxpayer in its own right.
In addition to its own current and deferred tax amounts, the Company also recognises the current tax liabilities (or assets) and the deferred tax assets it has assumed from unused tax losses and unused tax credits from controlled entities in the tax consolidated group.

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Assets or liabilities arising under tax funding agreements within the tax consolidated entities are recognised as amounts receivable from or payable to other entities in the group. Any differences between the amounts assumed and amounts receivable or payable under the tax funding agreement are recognised as a contribution to (or distribution from) wholly-owned tax consolidated entities.
All the entities in the tax consolidated group have entered into a valid and current tax sharing agreement which, in the opinion of the Directors, limits the joint and several liability of the wholly-owned entities in the case of an income tax obligation default by the head entity.

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Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand, deposits held at call with financial institutions and other short-term, highly liquid investments that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value.

(i) Trade receivables
Trade and other receivables are recognised initially at fair value and subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, less provision for impairment. An allowance for impairment of trade receivables is established when there is objective evidence that Fortescue will not be able to collect all amounts due.
Collectability of trade receivables is reviewed on a monthly basis. When there is objective evidence that Fortescue will not be able to collect all amounts due according to the original terms of the receivables, an allowance for impairment of trade receivables is raised. Debts which are known to be uncollectible are written off by reducing the carrying amount directly. Significant financial difficulties of the debtor, probability that the debtor will enter bankruptcy or financial reorganisation and default or delinquency in payments are considered indicators that the trade receivable may not be collected. The amount of the impairment allowance is the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of estimated future cash flows, discounted at the original effective interest rate. Cash flows relating to short-term receivables are not discounted if the effect of discounting is immaterial.
The amount of the impairment allowance is recognised in profit and loss within other administration expenses. When a trade receivable for which an impairment allowance had been recognised becomes uncollectible in a subsequent period, it is written off against the allowance account. Subsequent recoveries of amounts previously written off are credited against other administration expenses.

(j) Inventories
Raw materials and stores, work in progress and finished goods are stated at the lower of cost and net realisable value.
Cost for raw materials and stores is determined as the purchase price. For partly processed and saleable iron ore, cost is based on the weighted average cost method and includes:


labour costs, materials and contractor expenses which are directly attributable to the extraction and processing of ore;



production overheads, including attributable mining and manufacturing overheads; and



transportation expenditure in bringing such inventories to their existing location and condition, together with an appropriate portion of fixed and variable overhead expenditure.

Iron ore stockpiles represent ore that has been extracted and is available for further processing or sale. If there is significant uncertainty as to when the stockpiled ore will be processed it is expensed as incurred. Where the future processing of this ore can be predicted with confidence (if, for example, it exceeds the Group’s cut off grade), it is valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value. If the ore will not be processed within 12 months after the balance sheet date it is included within non-current assets. Quantities are assessed primarily through internal and third party surveys.

(k) Financial assets
Fortescue classifies its investments into the following categories: loans and receivables, financial assets at fair value through profit or loss and available for sale financial assets. The classification depends on the purpose for which the investments were acquired. Management determines the classification of its investments at initial recognition.
Financial assets are initially measured at fair value. Transaction costs that are directly attributable to the acquisition of financial assets, other than financial assets at fair value through profit or loss, are deducted from the fair value of the financial assets, as appropriate, on initial recognition. Transaction costs directly attributable to the acquisition of financial assets at fair value through profit or loss are recognised immediately in profit or loss.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

(h) Cash and cash equivalents

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 1. Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)
(i) Loans and receivables

Loans and receivables are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market and include trade receivables. They are included in current assets, except for those with maturities greater than 12 months after the reporting date which are classified as non-current assets.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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(ii) Financial assets through profit or loss

Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss are financial assets held for trading. Derivatives are classified as held for trading unless they are designated as hedges.
This category comprises only interest rate swaps. They are carried in the balance sheet at fair value with changes in fair value recognised in profit and loss. Other than interest rate derivative financial instruments, Fortescue does not have any assets held for trading nor has it designated any other financial assets as being at fair value through profit or loss.
The fair value of Fortescue’s interest rate derivative was based on comparisons to variable LIBOR rates.

(iii) Available for sale financial assets

Available for sale financial assets, comprising principally marketable equity securities, are non-derivatives that are either designated in this category or not classified in any of the other categories. They are included in non-current assets unless management intends to dispose of the investment within 12 months of the reporting date. Investments are designated as available-for-sale if they do not have fixed maturities and fixed or determinable payments and management intends to hold them for the medium to long term. These instruments are recognised at fair value, with changes in fair value being recognised directly in other comprehensive income, unless the change is considered to be a significant or prolonged decrease below original cost, in which case the decrease is recognised in profit or loss as an impairment loss.

(l) Financial liabilities
Fortescue classifies its financial liabilities into one of the following categories, depending on the purpose for which the liability was acquired.

(i) Fair value through profit and loss

This category comprises only derivative financial instruments. They are carried in the balance sheet at fair value with changes in fair value recognised in profit or loss. Other than these derivative financial instruments, Fortescue does not have any liabilities held for trading nor has it designated any financial liabilities as being at fair value through profit or loss. (ii) Financial liabilities measured at amortised cost

Trade payables and other short-term monetary liabilities, are initially recognised at fair value and subsequently carried at amortised cost using the effective interest method.
Borrowings are initially recognised at fair value, net of any directly attributable transaction costs.
After initial recognition, interest bearing borrowings are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest rate method, which ensures that any interest expense over the period to repayment is at a constant rate on the balance of the liability carried in the balance sheet. Interest expense in this context includes initial amortisation of transaction costs and those payable on redemption, as well as any interest or coupon payable while the liability is outstanding.

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Fees paid on the establishment of loan facilities are recognised as transaction costs of the loan to the extent that it is probable that some or all of the facility will be drawn down. In this case the fee is recognised as an adjustment to the instrument’s effective interest rate and recognised as an expense over the estimated period of the facility. To the extent that the facility has not been drawn down, the fee is capitalised within other current assets to be amortised over the period to which the facility relates.
Fair value is calculated by discounting estimated future cash flows using a market rate of interest.

(iii) Financial guarantee contract liabilities

A financial guarantee contract is a contract that requires the issuer to make specified payments to reimburse the holder for a loss it incurs because a specified debtor fails to make payments when due in accordance with the terms of a debt instrument. NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 1. Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)
Financial guarantee contract liabilities are initially measured at their fair values and, if not designated as at fair value through profit and loss, are subsequently measured at the higher of:


the amount of the obligation under the contract, as determined in accordance with AASB 137 Provisions,
Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets; and



the amount initially recognised less, where appropriate, cumulative amortisation recognised in accordance with the revenue recognition policies set out in note 1(f ) above.

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(m) Hedge accounting

At the inception of the hedge relationship, the entity documents the relationship between the hedging instrument and the hedged item, along with its risk management objectives and its strategy for undertaking various hedge transactions. Furthermore, at the inception of the hedge and on an ongoing basis, the Group documents whether the hedging instrument is highly effective in offsetting changes in fair values or cash flows of the hedged item attributable to the hedged risk.

Cash flow hedges

The effective portion of changes in the fair value of cash assets due to the movements in foreign exchange rates that are designated and qualify as cash flow hedges is recognised in other comprehensive income. The gain or loss relating to the ineffective portion is recognised immediately in profit or loss.
When the forecast transaction that is being hedged results in the recognition of a non-financial asset the gains and losses previously deferred in other comprehensive income are transferred from equity and adjust the cost of the asset.
When a cash flow hedge no longer meets the criteria for hedge accounting then hedge accounting is discontinued prospectively. If the forecast transaction is no longer expected to occur, the cumulative gain or loss that was reported in other comprehensive income is immediately reclassified to profit or loss.

(n) Parent entity financial information
The financial information for the parent entity, Fortescue Metals Group Limited, disclosed in note 37 has been prepared on the same basis as the consolidated financial statements, except as set out below.

(i) Investments in subsidiaries, associates and joint ventures

Investments in subsidiaries, associates and joint ventures are accounted for at cost in the financial statements of
Fortescue Metals Group Limited.

(ii) Tax consolidation legislation

Fortescue Metals Group Limited and its wholly-owned Australian controlled entities have implemented the tax consolidation legislation. The entities have also entered into a tax funding agreement under which the wholly-owned entities fully compensate the Company for any current tax payable assumed and are compensated by the Company for any current tax receivable and deferred tax assets relating to unused tax losses or unused tax credits that are transferred to the Company under the tax consolidation legislation. The funding amounts are determined by reference to the amounts recognised in the wholly-owned entities’ financial statements.
The amounts receivable or payable under the tax funding agreement are due upon receipt of the funding advice from the head entity, which is issued as soon as practicable after the end of each financial year. The head entity may also require payment of interim funding amounts to assist with its obligations to pay tax instalments.
Assets or liabilities arising under tax funding agreements with the tax consolidated entities are recognised as non-current amounts receivable from or payable to other entities in the Group.
Any difference between the amounts assumed and amounts receivable or payable under the tax funding agreement are recognised as a contribution to, or distribution from, wholly-owned tax consolidated entities.

(o) Property, plant and equipment
(i) Recognition and measurement

Each class of property, plant and equipment is stated at historical cost less, where applicable, any accumulated depreciation and impairment loss. Historical cost includes expenditure that is directly attributable to the acquisition of the assets.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Fortescue has implemented a non-derivative hedge strategy to hedge its risks associated with foreign currency fluctuations. NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 1. Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)
The cost of self-constructed assets includes the cost of materials and direct labour and any other costs directly attributable to bringing an asset to a working condition ready for its intended use. When separate parts of an item of property, plant and equipment have different useful lives, they are accounted for as separate items of property, plant and equipment. Purchased software that is integral to the functionality of the related equipment is capitalised as part of the equipment.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

76

Cost also may include transfers from equity of any gain or loss on qualifying cash flow hedges of foreign currency purchases of property, plant and equipment. Borrowing costs related to the acquisition or construction of qualifying assets are capitalised.
Assets under construction are included as assets under development within exploration, evaluation and development expenditure. Upon commissioning, which is the date when the asset is in the location and condition necessary for it to be capable of operating in the manner intended by management, the assets are transferred into property, plant and equipment or development assets, as appropriate.

(ii) Subsequent costs

Subsequent costs are included in the asset’s carrying amount or recognised as a separate asset, as appropriate, only when it is probable that future economic benefits associated with these subsequent costs will flow to Fortescue and the cost of the item can be measured reliably. On-going repairs and maintenance are recognised as an expense in profit and loss during the financial period in which they are incurred.

(iii) Depreciation

Depreciation on assets, other than land, is calculated using the straight-line method or units of production method to allocate their cost, net of residual values, over the estimated useful lives. Depreciation commences on the date of commissioning. Land is not depreciated.
Gains and losses arising on disposal of property, plant and equipment are recognised in profit or loss and determined by comparing proceeds from the sale of the assets with their carrying amount.
Straight line method
Assets within operations where the useful life is not dependent on the quantities of iron ore produced are generally depreciated on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of the assets as follows:


Buildings

20 - 40 years



Machinery

3 - 25 years



Motor vehicles

3 - 5 years



Furniture, fittings and equipment

3 - 8 years



Leased plant and equipment

5 - 15 years

The estimated useful lives, residual values and depreciation method are reviewed at the end of each reporting period, with the effect of any changes in estimate accounted for on a prospective basis.
Units of production method
Where the useful life of an asset is directly linked to the extraction of iron ore from the mine, the asset is depreciated using the units of production method. The units of production method is an amortised charge proportional to the depletion of the estimated proven and probable reserves.

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(p) Leases
Leases of property, plant and equipment where Fortescue, as lessee, has substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership are classified as finance leases. Finance leases are capitalised at the inception of the lease at the fair value of the leased assets or, if lower, the estimated present value of the minimum lease payments. The corresponding finance lease obligations are included in other short-term and long-term payables. Each lease payment is allocated between the liability and finance cost and the finance cost is charged to profit and loss over the lease period to reflect a constant periodic rate of interest on the remaining balance of the liability for each period. The property, plant and equipment acquired under finance leases is depreciated over the shorter of the asset’s useful life and the lease term.
Leases in which a significant portion of the risks and rewards of ownership are not transferred to Fortescue as lessee are classified as operating leases. Payments made under operating leases are recognised as an expense in profit and loss on a straight-line basis over the period of the lease.

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 1. Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(q) Capitalised borrowing costs
Borrowing costs directly attributable to the acquisition, construction or production of qualifying assets, which are assets that necessarily take a substantial period of time to get ready for their intended use or sale, are added to the cost of those assets, until such time as the assets are substantially ready for their intended use or sale.
Investment income earned on the temporary investment of specific borrowings pending their expenditure on qualifying assets is deducted from the borrowing costs eligible for capitalisation.

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(r) Exploration, evaluation and development expenditure
Exploration and evaluation activity involves the search for mineral resources, the determination of technical feasibility and the assessment of commercial viability of an identified resource. Exploration and evaluation expenditure incurred is accumulated in respect of each identifiable area of interest. Exploration and evaluation expenditure is measured at cost and includes:


researching and analysing historical exploration data;



gathering exploration data through topographical, geochemical and geophysical studies;



exploratory drilling, trenching and sampling;



determining and examining the value and grade of the resource;



surveying transportation and infrastructure requirements;



conducting market and finance studies;



administration costs that are directly attributable to a specific exploration area; and



licensing costs.

Exploration and evaluation expenditure related to each identifiable area of interest are recognised as an exploration and evaluation asset in the year in which they are incurred. These costs are only carried forward to the extent that the following conditions are satisfied:


rights to tenure of the identifiable area of interest are current; and



at least one of the following conditions is also met:
i) the expenditure is expected to be recouped through the successful development of the identifiable area of interest, or alternatively, by its sale; or ii) where activities in the identifiable area of interest have not at the reporting date reached a stage that permits a reasonable assessment of the existence or otherwise of economically recoverable reserves and activities in, or in relation to, the area of interest.

A regular review is undertaken of each area of interest to determine the appropriateness of continuing to carry forward costs in relation to that area of interest. Accumulated costs in relation to an abandoned area are written off in full in profit and loss in the year in which the decision to abandon the area is made.
Exploration and evaluation assets are reviewed at each reporting date for indicators of impairment and tested for impairment where such indicators exist. If the test indicates that the carrying value might not be recoverable the asset is written down to its recoverable amount. Any such impairment arising is recognised in profit and loss for the year.
Where an impairment loss subsequently reverses, the carrying amount of the asset is increased to the revised estimate of its recoverable amount, but only to the extent that the increased carrying amount does not exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined had no impairment loss been recognised for the asset in previous years.
Once the technical feasibility and commercial viability of the extraction of mineral resources in an area of interest are demonstrable, exploration and evaluation assets attributable to that area of interest are first tested for impairment and then reclassified from exploration and evaluation expenditure to development expenditure.
Once a mining project has been established as commercially viable and technically feasible, expenditure other than that on land, buildings, plant and equipment is capitalised as development expenditure. Development expenditure includes previously capitalised exploration and evaluation costs, pre-production development costs, development studies and other subsurface expenditure pertaining to that area of interest. Costs related to surface plant and equipment and any associated land and buildings are accounted for as property, plant and equipment.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

All other borrowing costs are recognised in profit or loss in the period in which they are incurred.

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 1. Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)
Development costs are accumulated in respect of each separate area of interest. Costs associated with commissioning new assets in the period before they are capable of operating in the manner intended by management, are capitalised.
Development costs incurred after the commencement of production are capitalised to the extent they are expected to give rise to a future economic benefit.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

78

When an area of interest is abandoned or the Directors decide that it is not commercial or technically feasible, any accumulated cost in respect of that area is written off in the financial period the decision is made. Each area of interest is reviewed at the end of each accounting period and the accumulated costs written off to profit and loss to the extent that they will not be recoverable in the future.
Amortisation of carried forward exploration and development costs is charged on a unit of production basis over the life of economically recoverable reserves.

(s) Impairment of non-financial assets
Assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable. The Group conducts an internal review of asset values bi-annually, which is used as a source of information to assess for any indications of impairment. External factors, such as changes in expected future prices, costs and other market factors are also monitored to assess for indications of impairment. If any such indication exists, an estimate of the asset’s recoverable amount is calculated, being the higher of fair value less direct costs to sell and the asset’s value in use. An impairment loss is recognised for the amount by which the asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount.
Fair value is determined as the amount that would be obtained from the sale of the asset in an arm’s length transaction between knowledgeable and willing parties. Fair value for mineral assets is generally determined as the present value of the estimated future cash flows expected to arise from the continued use of the asset, including any expansion prospects, and its eventual disposal, using assumptions that an independent market participant may take into account.
These cash flows are discounted using an appropriate discount rate to arrive at a net present value of the asset.
Value in use is determined as the present value of the estimated future cash flows expected to arise from the continued use of the asset in its present form and its eventual disposal, discounted using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the asset for which the estimates of future cash flows have not been adjusted. Value in use is determined by applying assumptions specific to the Group’s continued use and does not take into account future development.
In testing for indications of impairment and performing impairment calculations, assets are considered as collective groups and referred to as cash generating units. Cash generating units are the smallest identifiable groups of assets and liabilities that generate cash inflows that are largely independent of the cash inflows from other assets or groups of assets. Impaired assets are reviewed for possible reversal of the impairment at each reporting date.

(t) Intangible assets
Costs incurred in developing products or systems and costs incurred in acquiring software and licenses that will contribute to future period financial benefits through revenue generation or cost reduction are capitalised as software.
Costs capitalised include external direct costs of materials and consultants services, direct payroll and payroll related costs of employees’ time spent on the project.

78

IT development costs include only those costs directly attributable to the development phase and are only recognised following completion of technical feasibility and where Fortescue has an intention and ability to use the asset.
Intangible assets are amortised on a straight line basis over periods generally ranging from 3 to 5 years.

(u) Finance costs
Finance costs comprise interest expense, except where they are incurred for the construction of a qualifying asset, unwinding of the discount on provisions and impairment losses recognised on financial assets.

(v) Provisions
Provisions are recognised when Fortescue has a present legal or constructive obligation as a result of past events, it is more likely than not that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation and the amount can be reliably estimated. NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 1. Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)
Provisions are measured at the present value of management’s best estimate of the expenditure required to settle the present obligation at the balance sheet date. The discount rate used to determine the present value reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the liability. The increase in the provision due to the passage of time is recognised as interest expense.

(w) Employee benefits
Liabilities for wages and salaries, including non-monetary benefits, annual leave and accumulating sick leave expected to be settled within 12 months of the reporting date are recognised in other payables and accruals in respect of employee services up to the reporting date and are measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are settled.

(ii) Long service leave

The liability for long service leave is recognised in the provision for employee benefits and measured as the present value of expected future payments to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date using the projected unit credit method. Consideration is given to expected future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures and periods of service. Expected future payments are discounted using market yields at the reporting date on Australian Government bonds with terms to maturity and currency that match, as closely as possible, the estimated future cash outflows.
The liability for long service leave for which settlement within 12 months of the reporting date cannot be deferred is recognised in the current provision for employee benefits. The liability for long service leave for which settlement can be deferred beyond 12 months from the reporting date is recognised in the non-current provision for employee benefits. (iii) Share-based payments

Share-based remuneration benefits are provided to employees via the Fortescue Metals Group’s Incentive Option
Scheme (IOS) and Performance Rights Plan (PRP). Information relating to these schemes is set out in note 36.
The fair value of options granted under the IOS and PRP are recognised as an employee benefit expense with a corresponding increase in equity. The fair value is measured at grant date and recognised over the period during which the employees become unconditionally entitled to the options.
The fair value at grant date is independently determined using either a binomial or trinomial lattice option pricing model that takes into account the exercise price, the term of the option, the impact of dilution, the share price at grant date and expected price volatility of the underlying share, the effect of additional market conditions, the expected dividend yield and the risk free interest rate for the term of the option.
The fair value of the options granted is measured to reflect expected market vesting conditions, but excludes the impact of any non-market vesting conditions (for example, profitability and sales growth targets). Non-market vesting conditions are included in assumptions about the number of options that are expected to become exercisable. At each reporting date, the entity revises its estimate of the number of options that are expected to become exercisable.
The employee benefit expense recognised each period takes into account the most recent estimate. The impact of the revision to original estimates, if any, is recognised in profit and loss with a corresponding adjustment to equity.

(iv) Incentive plans

Fortescue recognises a liability and an expense for incentive payments where contractually obliged or where there is a past practice that has created a constructive obligation.

(x) Contributed equity
Ordinary shares are classified as equity.
Incremental costs directly attributable to the issue of new shares are shown in equity as a deduction, net of tax, from the proceeds. (y) Dividends
Provision is made for the amount of any dividend declared, being appropriately authorised and no longer at the discretion of the Company, on or before the end of the reporting period but not distributed at the end of the reporting period. 79

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

(i) Wages and salaries, annual leave and sick leave

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 1. Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(z) Earnings per share
(i) Basic earnings per share

Basic earnings per share is calculated by dividing the net profit for the financial year attributable to the ordinary shareholders by the weighted average number of ordinary shares on issue during the financial year.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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(ii) Diluted earnings per share

Diluted earnings per share is calculated by dividing the net profit for the financial year attributable to the ordinary shareholders by the weighted average number of ordinary shares on issue during the financial year, after adjusting for the effects of all potential dilutive ordinary shares that were outstanding during the financial year.

(aa) Rehabilitation
The mining, extraction and processing activities of Fortescue give rise to obligations for site rehabilitation.
Rehabilitation obligations can include facility decommissioning and dismantling, removal or treatment of waste materials, land rehabilitation and site restoration. The extent of work required and the associated costs are estimated based on feasibility and engineering studies using current restoration standards and techniques. Provisions for the cost of each rehabilitation program are recognised at the time that environmental disturbance occurs.
Rehabilitation provisions are initially measured at the expected value of future cash flows required to rehabilitate the relevant site, discounted to their present value. The judgements and estimates applied for the estimation of the rehabilitation provisions are discussed in note 2.
When provisions for closure and rehabilitation are initially recognised, the corresponding cost is capitalised into the cost of the related asset, representing part of the cost of acquiring the future economic benefits of the operation. The capitalised cost of closure and rehabilitation activities is recognised within development expenditure and amortised based on the units-of-production method over the life of the mine. The value of the provision is progressively increased over time as the effect of discounting unwinds, creating an expense recognised in the financial statements.
Where rehabilitation is expected to be conducted systematically over the life of the operation, rather than at the time of closure, provision is made for the present obligation or estimated outstanding continuous rehabilitation work at each balance sheet date and the costs charged to profit and loss in line with remaining future cash flows.
At each reporting date the rehabilitation liability is re-measured to account for any new disturbance, updated cost estimates, changes to the estimated reserves, resources and lives of operations, new regulatory requirements, environmental policies and revised discount rates. Changes to the rehabilitation liability are added to or deducted from the related rehabilitation asset and amortised accordingly.

(ab) Deferred stripping
Overburden and other mine waste materials are often removed during the initial development of a mine in order to access the mineral deposit. This activity is referred to as development stripping. The directly attributable costs, inclusive of an allocation of relevant overhead expenditure, are capitalised as development costs. Capitalisation of development stripping costs ceases and amortisation of those capitalised costs commences upon extraction of iron ore. Amortisation of capitalised development stripping costs is determined on a unit of production basis for each separate area of interest.
Capitalised development and production stripping costs are classified as development expenditure. Development stripping costs are considered in combination with other assets of an operation for the purpose of undertaking impairment assessments.

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Removal of waste material normally continues throughout the life of a mine. This activity is referred to as production stripping and commences upon extraction of iron ore. Production stripping costs for Cloudbreak and Christmas Creek area of interest are not deferred but charged to profit and loss as they are incurred.

(ac) Goods and Services Tax (GST)
Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of associated GST, except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO). In these circumstances the GST is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset or as part of an item of the expense. Receivables and payables in the balance sheet are shown inclusive of GST. The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the ATO is included as a current asset or liability in the balance sheet.
Cash flows are presented in the cash flow statement on a gross basis, except for the GST component of investing and financing activities, which are disclosed as operating cash flows.

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 1. Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(ad) New accounting standards and interpretations
(i) New and amended standards adopted by the Group

The following new standards and amendments to standards are mandatory for the first time for the financial year beginning 1 July 2010:
AASB 2009-5 Further Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from the Annual Improvements
Project - adopted early by the Group in the 2010 financial report;



AASB 2009-8 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards - Group Cash-settled Share-based Payment
Transactions;



AASB 2009-10 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards - Classification of Rights Issues; and



AASB 2010-3 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from the Annual Improvements Project.

The adoption of these standards did not have any impact on the current period or any prior period and is not likely to affect future periods.

(ii) New accounting standards and interpretations not yet adopted

Certain new accounting standards and interpretations have been published that are not mandatory for 30 June 2011 reporting periods and have not yet been applied in the financial report. The Group’s assessment of the impact of these new standards and interpretations is set out below.


AASB 2010-6 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards - Disclosures on Transfers of Financial Assets
(effective for annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 July 2011). Amendments made to AASB 7
Financial Instruments: Disclosures in November 2010, introduce additional disclosures in respect of risk exposures arising from transferred financial assets. The amendments are not expected to have any significant impact on the Group’s disclosures. The Group intends to apply the amendment from 1 July 2011.



IFRS 10 Consolidated Financial Statements (effective for the annual reporting periods commencing on or after
1 January 2013). IFRS 10 introduces certain changes to the consolidation principles, including the concept of de facto control and changes in relation to the special purpose entities. Fortescue is continuing to assess the impact of the standard. The AASB has not yet updated the Australian equivalent of IFRS 10.



IFRS 11 Joint Arrangements (effective for the annual reporting periods commencing on or after 1 January
2013). IFRS 11 introduces certain changes to the accounting for joint arrangements. Joint arrangments will be classified as either joint operations (where parties with joint control have rights to assets and obligations for liabilities) or joint ventures (where parties with joint control have rights to the net assets of the arrangement).
Joint arrangements structured as a separate vehicle will generally be treated as joint ventures and accounted for using the equity method. Fortescue is continuing to assess the impact of the standard. The AASB has not yet updated the Australian equivalent of IFRS 11.



IFRS 13 Fair Value Measurement (effective for annual reporting periods commencing on or after 1 January 2013).
IFRS 13 establishes a single framework for measuring fair value of financial and non-financial items recognised at fair value on the balance sheet or disclosed in the notes to the financial statements. Fortescue is continuing to assess the impact of the standard. The AASB has not yet updated the Australian equivalent of IFRS 13.



IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements (effective for annual reporting periods commencing on or after 1
July 2013). IAS 1, amended in June 2011, introduces amendments to align the presentation items of other comprehensive income with US GAAP. Fortescue will apply the amended standard from 1 July 2013. When the standard is first adopted, there will be changes to the presentation of the statement of comprehensive income.
However, there will be no impact on any of the amounts recognised in the financial statements.



AASB 1054 Australian Additional Disclosures (effective for annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1
July 2011). AASB 1054, issued in May 2011, moves additional Australian specific disclosure requirements for for-profit entities from various Australian Accounting Standards into this Standard as a result of Trans-Tasman
Convergence Project. AASB 1054Australian Additional Disclosures removes the requirement to disclose each class of capital commitments contracted for at the end of the reporting period (other than commitments for the supply of inventories). When the standard is adopted for the first time for the financial year ending 30 June 2012, the financial statements will no longer include disclosures about capital and other expenditure commitments as these are no longer required by AASB 1054.



AASB 9 Financial Instruments and AASB 2009-11 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from
AASB 9 and AASB 2010-7 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 9 (December 2010)
(effective for annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2013). AASB 9 addresses the classification, measurement and derecognition of financial assets and financial liabilities. The standard is not applicable until 1
January 2013 but is available for early adoption. Fortescue is continuing to assess its full impact.

81

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011



NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 1. Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)


Revised AASB 124 Related Party Disclosures and AASB 2009-12 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards
(effective for annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2011). In December 2009 the AASB issued a revised AASB 124 Related Party Disclosures. It is effective for accounting periods beginning on or after
1 January 2011 and must be applied retrospectively. The amendment clarifies and simplifies the definition of a related party. Fortescue will apply the amended standard from 1 July 2011. When the amendments are applied,
Fortescue will need to disclose any transactions between its subsidiaries and its associates. However, there will be no impact on any of the amounts recognised in the financial statements.



AASB 1053 Application of Tiers of Australian Accounting Standards and AASB 2010-2 Amendments to Australian
Accounting Standards arising from Reduced Disclosure Requirements (effective from 1 July 2013). On 30 June 2010 the AASB officially introduced a revised differential reporting framework in Australia. Under this framework, a two-tier differential reporting regime applies to all entities that prepare general purpose financial statements.
Fortescue is listed on the ASX and is not eligible to adopt the new Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced
Disclosure Requirements. The two standards will therefore have no impact on the financial statements of the entity. •

AASB 2010-8 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards - Deferred Tax: Recovery of Underlying Assets
(effective from 1 January 2012). In December 2010, the AASB amended AASB 112 Income Taxes to provide a practical approach for measuring deferred tax liabilities and deferred tax assets when investment property is measured using the fair value model. AASB 112 requires the measurement of deferred tax assets and liabilities to reflect the tax consequences that would follow from the way management expects to recover or settle the carrying amount of the relevant assets or liabilities, that is through use or through sale. The amendment introduces a rebuttable presumption that investment property which is measured at fair value is recovered entirely by sale. The amendment is not expected to have any significant impact on Fortescue’s financial statements. Fortescue intends to apply the amendment from 1 July 2012.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

82

(ae) Comparatives
Where applicable, certain comparatives have been adjusted to conform with current year presentation.

Note 2. Critical accounting estimates and judgements
The preparation of the consolidated financial statements requires management to make judgements and estimates and form assumptions that affect how certain assets, liabilities, revenue, expenses and equity are reported. At each reporting period, management evaluates its judgements and estimates based on historical experience and on other various factors it believes to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis of the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions and conditions.
Fortescue has identified the following critical accounting policies where significant judgements and estimates are made by management in the preparation of these financial statements.

(i) Income taxes

The Group is subject to income taxes in Australia and jurisdictions where it has foreign operations. Significant judgement is required in determining the provisions for income taxes. There are certain transactions and calculations undertaken during the ordinary course of business for which the ultimate tax determination is uncertain. Fortescue estimates its tax liabilities based on the Group’s understanding of the tax law. Where the final tax outcome of these matters is different from the amounts that were initially recorded, such differences will impact the current and deferred income tax assets and liabilities in the period in which such determination is made.

82

Fortescue has recognised deferred tax assets relating to carried forward tax losses to the extent there are sufficient taxable temporary differences relating to the same taxation authority against which the unused tax losses can be utilised. The utilisation of the tax losses depends on the ability of the entities to generate sufficient future taxable profits. (ii) Iron ore reserve estimates

Iron ore reserves are estimates of the amount of product that can be economically and legally extracted from
Fortescue’s current mining tenements. In order to calculate ore reserves, estimates and assumptions are required about a range of geological, technical and economic factors, including quantities, grades, production techniques, recovery rates, production costs, transport costs, commodity demand, commodity prices and exchange rates. Estimating the quantity and grade of ore reserves requires the size, shape and depth of ore bodies or fields to be determined by analysing geological data such as drilling samples. This requires complex and difficult geological judgements and calculations to interpret the data.

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 2. Critical accounting estimates and judgements (continued)
Because the economic assumptions used to estimate reserves change from period to period, and because additional geological data is generated during the course of operations, estimates of reserves may change from period to period.
Changes in reported reserves may affect Fortescue’s financial results and financial position in a number of ways, including the following:


Asset carrying values may be affected due to changes in estimated future cash flows;



Depreciation and amortisation charges in profit and loss may change where such charges are determined by the units of production basis, or where the useful economic lives of assets change; and



The carrying value of deferred tax assets may change due to changes in estimates of the likely recovery of tax benefits.

83

Fortescue’s accounting policy for exploration and evaluation expenditure results in expenditure being capitalised for an area of interest where it is considered likely to be recoverable by future exploitation or sale or where the activities have not reached a stage which permits a reasonable assessment of the existence of reserves. This policy requires management to make certain estimates as to future events and circumstances, in particular whether an economically viable extraction operation can be established. Any such estimates and assumptions may change as new information becomes available. If, after having capitalised the expenditure under the policy, a judgement is made that recovery of the expenditure is unlikely, the relevant capitalised amount will be written off to profit and loss.

(iv) Development expenditure

Development activities commence after commercial viability and technical feasibility of the project is established.
Judgement is applied by management in determining when a project is commercially viable and technically feasible. In exercising this judgement, management is required to make certain estimates and assumptions as to the future events.
If, after having commenced the development activity, a judgement is made that a development asset is impaired, the appropriate amount will be written off to profit and loss.

(v) Property, plant and equipment – recoverable amount

The determination of fair value and value in use requires management to make estimates about expected production and sales volumes, commodity prices, reserves (see ‘iron ore reserve estimates’ above), operating costs, rehabilitation costs and future capital expenditure. Changes in circumstances will alter these projections, which may impact the recoverable amount of the assets. In such circumstances, some or all of the carrying value of the assets may be impaired and the impairment would be charged to profit and loss.

(vi) Rehabilitation

Fortescue’s accounting policy for the recognition of rehabilitation provisions requires significant estimates including the magnitude of possible works required for removal or treatment of waste materials and the extent of work required and the associated costs of rehabilitation work. These uncertainties may result in future actual expenditure differing from the amounts currently provided.

(vii) Unsecured loan note

The Company put in place a US$100 million unsecured loan note during the 2007 financial year. Interest under the note is calculated as 4 per cent of the revenue, net of government royalties, from the sale of iron ore free on board (FOB) Port
Hedland from the tenements of the Cloudbreak and Christmas Creek areas only. Accordingly the interest is only payable on iron ore produced and shipped from these two tenement areas for a period of 13 years from 18 August 2006.
The carrying amount of the note is subject to re-estimation at each reporting date in line with changes in the following management estimates and assumptions, prevailing market conditions and economic forecasts:


Forecast production profile from Christmas Creek and Cloudbreak area of interest;



Forecast future iron ore prices determined by an independent resource sector analyst of future iron ore prices;



The discount rate, determined as implicit interest rate of 42 per cent and applied since inception of the loan note; •

Expected royalty rates payable to the Western Australian state government; and



The reserve estimate of Cloudbreak and Christmas Creek area.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

(iii) Exploration and evaluation expenditure

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 3. Financial risk management
The financial risks that arise during the normal course of Fortescue’s operations comprise market risk, credit risk and liquidity risk. Fortescue’s overall risk management program focuses on the unpredictability of financial markets and seeks to minimise potential adverse effects on financial performance.

(i) General objectives, policies and processes

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

84

The Board has overall responsibility for the determination of Fortescue’s risk management objectives and policies, and whilst retaining ultimate responsibility for them, it has delegated the authority for designing and operating processes that ensure the effective implementation of the objectives and policies to the Audit and Risk Management Committee.
The Audit and Risk Management Committee receives reports as required from the Chief Financial Officer and other relevant Executives through which it reviews the effectiveness of the processes put in place and the appropriateness of the objectives and policies it sets.
Fortescue’s Audit and Risk Management Committee oversees how management monitors compliance with the Group’s risk management policies and procedures and reviews the adequacy of the risk management framework in relation to the risks faced by the Company and Fortescue. Fortescue’s Audit and Risk Management Committee is assisted in its oversight role by an independent internal auditor. The internal auditor undertakes regular reviews of risk management controls and procedures across Fortescue’s business operations, the results of which are reported to the Audit and Risk
Management Committee.
The overall objective of the Board is to set policies that seek to reduce risk as far as possible without unduly affecting
Fortescue’s competitiveness and flexibility.
The following table discloses the carrying amount of each class of financial assets and financial liabilities.
2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

2,662,719

1,235,538

369,114

200,086

8,520

95

3,040,353

1,435,719

4,662,376

2,975,663

Trade and other payables

997,089

805,576

Finance lease liabilities

208,615

12,844

-

16,285

5,868,080

3,810,368

Financial assets
Cash and cash equivalents
Trade and other receivables
Other financial assets

Financial liabilities
Borrowings

Derivatives held at fair value

84

All financial assets and financial liabilities, with the exception of derivatives, are initially recognised at the fair value of the consideration paid or received, net of directly attributable transaction costs. Subsequently, the financial assets and financial liabilities, other than derivatives, are measured at amortised cost. The carrying values of the financial assets and liabilities approximate their fair values.

(a) Market risk
Market risk arises from Fortescue’s exposure to commodity price risk and the use of interest bearing and foreign currency financial instruments. It is the risk that the fair value of future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in interest rates (interest rate risk), foreign exchange rates (currency risk) or iron ore prices
(commodity price risk).

(i) Foreign exchange risk

Fortescue operates internationally and is exposed to foreign exchange risk arising from various currency exposures primarily with respect to the Australian dollar and Euro. Fortescue is exposed to currency risk on cash reserves, trade and other receivables, borrowings, trade and other payables and other financial assets and liabilities.

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 3. Financial risk management (continued)
Fortescue’s policy is, where possible, to allow Group entities to settle liabilities denominated in their functional currency with the cash generated from their own operations in that currency. Where Group entities have liabilities denominated in a currency other than their functional currency, and have insufficient reserves of that currency to settle them, cash already denominated in that currency will, where possible, be transferred from other entities within Fortescue.

Foreign exchange risk arises from future commercial transactions and recognised assets and liabilities denominated in a currency that is not the entity’s functional currency. The exposure to risks is measured using sensitivity analysis and cash flow forecasting. Fortescue has not entered into any forward exchange contracts as at 30 June 2011.
The carrying amounts of the group’s financial assets and liabilities are denominated in five different currencies as set out below: 30 June 2010
USD

AUD

EURO

NZD

RMB

Total

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

Cash and cash equivalents

963,032

249,561

22,945

-

-

1,235,538

Trade and other receivables

115,990

81,074

3,022

-

-

200,086

Other financial assets

-

95

-

-

-

95

Total financial assets

1,079,022

330,730

25,967

-

-

1,435,719

2,477,175

120,331

378,157

-

-

2,975,663

556,809

248,767

-

-

-

805,576

-

12,844

-

-

-

12,844

Financial assets

Financial liabilities
Borrowings
Trade and other payables
Finance lease liabilities
Derivatives held at fair value
Total financial liabilities

16,285

-

-

-

-

16,285

3,050,269

381,942

378,157

-

-

3,810,368

30 June 2011
USD

AUD

EURO

NZD

RMB

Total

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

1,929,402

730,015

1,866

1,368

68

2,662,719

200,328

159,955

8,779

52

-

369,114

Other financial assets

-

8,520

-

-

-

8,520

Total financial assets

2,129,730

898,490

10,645

1,420

68

3,040,353

4,508,473

153,903

-

-

-

4,662,376

338,773

658,316

-

-

-

997,089

-

208,615

-

-

-

208,615

4,847,246

1,020,834

-

-

-

5,868,080

Financial assets
Cash and cash equivalents
Trade and other receivables

Financial liabilities
Borrowings
Trade and other payables
Finance lease liabilities
Total financial liabilities

85

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Fortescue has implemented a non-derivative foreign exchange rate cash flow hedge strategy. The non-derivative cash flow hedge strategy is designed to convert proceeds from the issuance of debt and liquidity created from operating cash flows into Australian dollars to eliminate foreign currency cash flow exposure on equivalent amounts denominated in Australian dollars contracted and highly probable forecast expenditure associated with the Group’s expansion projects. NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 3. Financial risk management (continued)
(ii) Commodity price risk

The Group is exposed to commodity price risk through the movement in contract iron ore prices that are based on an international iron ore index. Fortescue has not entered into any forward commodity price contracts as at 30 June 2011 and is currently fully exposed to commodity price risk. Fortescue’s exposure to commodity price risk at the reporting date was as follows:
2011
Trade receivables
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Unsecured loan note

2010

US$'000

86

US$'000

195,261

102,503

(943,913)

(826,240)

(iii) Interest rate risk

It is Fortescue’s policy either to substantially eliminate interest rate risk over the cash flows on its long-term debt finance through the use of fixed rate instruments or to mitigate the risk through the use of floating-to-fixed interest rate swaps.
Fortescue currently does not have floating rate financial instruments. The Group’s fixed rate borrowings and receivables are carried at amortised cost and are not subject to interest rate risk as defined in AASB 7 Financial Instruments:
Disclosures.
As at 30 June 2010 Fortescue had a floating-to-fixed interest rate swap over its US$250 million Euro-denominated senior secured notes. This interest rate swap together with the floating rate senior secured notes were extinguished during the year.
Fortescue invests surplus cash in term deposits and in doing so exposes itself to the fluctuations in interest rates that are inherent in such a market.
30 June 2011

30 June 2010

US$'000

US$'000

Borrowings - senior secured notes

-

250,947

Interest rate swaps

-

16,285

Net exposure to cash flow interest rate risk

-

267,232

86

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 3. Financial risk management (continued)
(iv) Summarised sensitivity analysis

The Group has used ranges of rate and price fluctuations that approximate the rates observed over the reporting period to estimate its sensitivity to market rates. The Group’s main interest rate exposures are to Australian short-term interest rates; its foreign exchange risk is to the Australian Dollar and Euro rates and commodity price risk is due to spot iron ore prices.

-25 bps
Carrying
amount
30 June
2010
Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents Trade and other receivables Other financial assets
Financial
liabilities
Borrowings
Trade and other payables Finance lease liabilities
Derivatives
held at fair value Total increase/ (decrease)

Pre-tax profit Foreign exchange risk

+25 bps

Other equity Pre-tax profit -10%

Other equity Pre-tax profit -40%
Other
equity

Pre-tax profit +40%
Other
equity

Pre-tax profit Other equity (3,089)

-

3,089

-

(27,251)

-

27,251

-

-

-

-

-

200,086

-

-

-

-

(8,330)

-

8,330

-

(49,594)

-

49,594

-

95

-

-

-

-

(10)

-

10

-

(38)

-

38

-

2,975,663

625

-

(625)

-

49,849

-

(49,849)

-

262,786

- (262,786)

-

805,576

-

-

-

-

38,142

-

(38,142)

-

-

-

-

-

12,844

-

-

-

-

1,969

-

(1,969)

16,285

(625)

-

625

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(3,089)

-

3,089

-

54,369

- (54,369)

-

213,154

- (213,154)

-

-25 bps

Trade and other payables Finance lease liabilities
Total
increase/
(decrease)

Pre-tax profit 1,235,538

Carrying amount Borrowings

+10%
Other
equity

87

US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000

Interest rate risk

30 June
2011
Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents Trade and other receivables Other financial assets
Financial
liabilities

Other price risk

Pre-tax profit Foreign exchange risk

+25 bps

Other equity Pre-tax profit -10%

Other equity Pre-tax profit Other price risk

+10%
Other
equity

Pre-tax profit -25%
Other
equity

Pre-tax profit +25%
Other
equity

Pre-tax profit Other equity US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000 US$'000

2,662,719

(6,657)

-

6,657

-

(73,325)

-

73,325

-

-

-

-

-

369,114

-

-

-

-

(16,879)

-

16,879

-

(57,157)

-

57,157

-

8,520

-

-

-

-

(835)

(17)

835

17

-

-

-

-

4,662,376

-

-

-

-

(15,390)

-

15,390

-

235,978

- (235,978)

-

997,089

-

-

-

-

(65,832)

-

65,832

-

-

-

-

-

208,615

-

-

-

-

(20,861)

-

20,861

-

-

-

-

-

(6,657)

-

6,657

- (193,122)

(17)

193,122

17

178,821

- (178,821)

-

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Interest rate risk

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 3. Financial risk management (continued)

(b) Credit risk
Credit risk is managed on a consolidated basis. Credit risk refers to the risk that a counterparty will default on its contractual obligations resulting in financial loss to Fortescue. Credit risk arises from cash and cash equivalents at bank, derivative financial instruments, deposits with banks and financial institutions and receivables from customers.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

88

Fortescue is exposed to a concentration of risk with the majority of its iron ore customers being located in China.
Fortescue has adopted a policy of only dealing with credit worthy counterparties as a means of mitigating the risk of financial loss from defaults. Cash and cash equivalents are held in various financial institutions with long-term investment grade credit rating and with the capacity for payment of financial commitments considered strong.
Fortescue has not recognised any bad debt expense in the 2011 or 2010 financial years.
The exposure to the credit risk from cash and short-term deposits held in banks is managed by the treasury department and monitored by the Board of Directors. Fortescue minimises the credit risks by holding funds with a range of financial institutions with the credit ratings approved by the Board.
The maximum exposure to credit risk at the reporting date is the carrying amount of the financial assets. For commodity trade receivables Fortescue mitigates its credit risk in most cases by obtaining security in the form of letters of credit on receipt of a bill of lading covering approximately 95 per cent of the value of iron ore shipped.
The analysis of receivables past due is presented in note 10(a). Fortescue does not consider there to be any potential impairment loss on these receivables.

(c) Liquidity risk
Liquidity risk is the risk that the Group will not be able to meet its financial obligations as and when they fall due. The
Group manages liquidity risk by maintaining adequate cash reserves and banking facilities, by continuously monitoring actual and forecast cashflows, and by matching the maturity profiles of financial assets and liabilities.

(i) Financing arrangements

The table below sets out details of cash and cash equivalents and undrawn facilities that the Group has at its disposal to further reduce liquidity risk.
2011
US$'000
Syndicated loan facility - amount unused
Syndicated loan facility - amount used

US$'000

2,662,719

1,235,538

600,000

-

-

-

3,262,719

Cash and cash equivalents

2010

1,235,538

On 29 June 2011, Fortescue entered into a Syndicated Loan Facility (Facility) with nine bank counterparties, pursuant to which up to US$600 million is available on a revolving basis at a margin of 3.25 per cent over the floating LIBOR rate. The Facility contains negative and affirmative covenants that are substantially consistent with Fortescue’s existing senior notes, and matures on 29 June 2014. Fortescue’s obligations under the Facility are guaranteed by certain of its subsidiaries. The facility is expected to be used for liquidity and general corporate purposes to support Fortescue’s expansion programmes.

88

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 3. Financial risk management (continued)
(ii) Maturities of financial liabilities

The tables below analyse the Group’s financial liabilities into relevant maturity groupings based on the remaining period at the reporting date to the contractual maturity date. The amounts disclosed in the table are the contractual undiscounted cash flows.
Less than 6 months 6 - 12 months Between
1 and 2 years Between
2 and 5 years US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

383,611

6,000

40,884

64,000

-

494,495

494,495

12,221

12,154

254,074

-

-

278,449

250,947

319,312

179,987

452,626

1,336,645

3,917,763

6,206,333

2,938,317

715,144

198,141

747,584

1,400,645

3,917,763

6,979,277

3,683,759

Net settled (interest rate swaps)

2,429

8,023

5,833

-

-

16,285

16,285

Total derivatives

2,429

8,023

5,833

-

-

16,285

16,285

Less than 6 months 6 - 12 months Between
1 and 2 years Between
2 and 5 years Total
Over 5 contractual years cash flows

Carrying amount liabilities

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

Non-interest bearing

726,065

40,000

33,000

48,000

-

847,065

847,065

Fixed rate

272,513

323,701

674,257

4,681,413

2,545,310

8,497,194

5,021,015

998,578

363,701

707,257

4,729,413

2,545,310

9,344,259

5,868,080

30 June 2010

Total
Over 5 contractual years cash flows

Carrying amount liabilities

89

Non-interest bearing
Variable rate
Fixed rate
Total non-derivatives
Derivatives

30 June 2011
Non-derivatives

Total non-derivatives

(d) Fair value estimation
The fair value of financial assets and financial liabilities must be estimated for recognition and measurement for disclosure purposes.
The fair value of borrowings for disclosure purposes would be estimated by discounting the future contractual cash flows at the current market interest rate that is available to Fortescue for similar financial instruments. The current carrying value of the senior secured notes (extinguished in October 2011), senior unsecured notes and preference shares are a close approximation of their fair value. However, due to the unique nature of Fortescue’s unsecured loan notes, there is no comparable instrument against which Fortescue can benchmark in order to determine the fair value of these borrowings.
AASB 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures requires disclosure of the levels of fair value measurements by hierarchy:


Level 1 - quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities;



Level 2 - inputs other than quoted prices included within level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly (as prices) or indirectly (derived from prices); and



Level 3 - inputs for the asset or liability that are not based on observable market data (unobservable inputs).

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Non-derivatives

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 3. Financial risk management (continued)
The following table presents the group’s assets and liabilities measured and recognised at fair value at 30 June 2011 and as at 30 June 2010.
Level 1
30 June 2010
90

Level 2

Level 3

Total

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

Assets
95

-

-

95

Total assets
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Available for sale financial assets - equity securities 95

-

-

95

Liabilities
Derivatives held at fair value

-

16,285

-

16,285

Total liabilities

-

16,285

-

16,285

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Total

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

30 June 2011
Assets
Available for sale financial assets - equity securities 175

-

-

175

Total assets

175

-

-

175

The fair value of financial instruments traded in active markets (such as publicly traded derivatives, and trading and available for sale securities) is based on quoted market prices at the end of the reporting period. The quoted market price used for financial assets held by the Group is the current bid price. These instruments are included in level 1.
The fair value of financial instruments that are not traded in an active market is determined using valuation techniques.
The Group uses a variety of methods and makes assumptions that are based on market conditions existing at the end of each reporting period. Quoted market prices or dealer quotes for similar instruments are used to estimate fair value for long-term debt for disclosure purposes. Other techniques, such as estimated discounted cash flows, are used to determine fair value for the remaining financial instruments. The fair value of interest rate swaps is calculated as the present value of the estimated future cash flows. These instruments are included in level 2. In the circumstances where a valuation technique for these instruments is based on significant unobservable inputs, such instruments are included in level 3.

(e) Capital management
Fortescue’s capital management policy provides a framework to maintain a strong capital structure to sustain the future development and expansion of the business and to provide consistent returns to its equity shareholders.
The capital structure of the Group consists of net debt (borrowings as detailed in notes 19 and 20 offset by cash and bank balances) and the equity of the Group (comprising issued capital, reserves and retained earnings as detailed in the
Statement of Changes in Equity.

90

The Group targets a conservative capital structure consistent with investment grade credit metrics throughout the development, expansion, production and commodity cycles.
The Group monitors capital using financial and non-financial indicators. Financial indicators include, but are not limited to, gearing ratios (calculated as net debt divided by net debt plus equity), interest coverage ratio (calculated as EBITDA divided by finance costs) and leverage ratio (net debt divided by EBITDA).
Target ranges for ratios are provided dependent upon the investment and commodity cycle. During periods of intensive investment, for example expansion programmes, or a commodity cycle downturn, the capital policy contemplates interim ratio levels moving to a targeted longer term level. Interim levels acknowledge and consider the requirements, in certain circumstances, for remedial action to be taken.

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 4. Segment information
Operating segments are reported in a manner consistent with the internal reporting provided to the chief operating decision maker. The chief operating decision maker, who is responsible for allocating resources and assessing performance of the operating segments, has been identified as the Chief Executive Officer.
The internal reporting is provided to the chief operating decision maker on the consolidated basis.
No operating segments have been aggregated to form the above consolidated information.

91

Fortescue operates predominantly in the geographical location of Australia, and this is the location of the vast majority of the segment assets. In presenting information on the basis of geographical segments, segment revenue is based on the geographical location of customers.
2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

China

5,269,935

3,113,779

Other

172,167

106,283

5,442,102

3,220,062

Revenues from external customers

Total revenue from external customers per statement of comprehensive income

(ii) Major customer information

Revenue from one customer amounted to US$386.6 million (2010: US$308.0 million), arising from the sale of iron ore and related shipment of product.

Note 5. Operating sales revenue

5,377,252

3,168,424

64,850

51,638
3,220,062

2011

2010

US$'000

Note 6. Other income

US$'000

5,442,102

Sale of third party product

2010

US$'000
Sale of iron ore

2011

US$'000

Third party port access

17,406

8,998

Provision of services

15,785

38,405

Other income

16,790

17,773

49,981

65,176

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

(i) Geographical information

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 7. Expenses

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

92

Cost of sales
Mining costs
Rail costs
Port costs
Operating leases
Shipping costs
Government royalty
Depreciation and amortisation
Other operating expenses*
Depreciation and amortisation expense
Depreciation of property, plant and equipment
Amortisation of development expenditure
Amortisation of intangible assets
Impairment of intangible assets - software
Administration expenses
Wages and salaries, including superannuation
Share based payments expense
Legal and consultants fees
Other administration expenses
Net finance expenses
Finance costs
Interest expense on borrowings
Interest expense on deposits received
Finance lease interest
Unwinding of discount on site rehabilitation provision
Movement in fair value of derivative instrument
Interest capitalised**
Other
Finance income
Interest income
Net finance expenses

92

Refinancing costs
Premium on buyback of senior secured notes
Bridging facility fees and interest
Redemption of borrowings above amortised cost

2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

1,384,324
127,767
96,926
134,005
508,524
289,406
177,376
39,258
2,757,586

884,375
101,238
70,691
124,552
612,267
150,558
153,174
28,697
2,125,552

114,686
51,400
3,737
7,553
177,376

80,298
71,302
1,574
153,174

36,390
6,295
22,367
31,672
96,724

7,924
1,771
11,118
3,892
24,705

482,513
5,245
4,173
3,534
(1,564)
(42,577)
2,965
454,289

376,741
10,090
1,576
1,452
1,480
2,876
394,215

24,591
429,698

18,909
375,306

668,353
30,882
19,966
719,201

-

* Other operating expenses include the cost of purchasing third party product, infrastructure services and Fortescue’s share of joint venture cost of sales.
** Interest has been capitalised at the rate of interest applicable to specific borrowings financing the development assets under construction, net of interest income from temporary investments on these borrowings. For the year ended
30 June 2011, the capitalisation rate was 5.68% (2010: nil).
Total employee benefits expense, included in cost of sales and administration expenses is US$437.6 million
(2010: US$285.1 million).

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 8. Income tax expense
(a) Income tax expense / (benefit)
2010
US$'000

Current tax

90,619

-

Deferred tax

221,894

(1,770)

312,513

(1,770)

Profit from continuing operations before income tax expense

1,335,068

579,176

Tax at the Australian tax rate of 30% (2010: 30%)

(400,520)

(173,753)

(102)

(1,417)

184

(503)

5,250

5,798

(b) Reconciliation of income tax expense to prima facie tax payable

Tax effect of amounts which are (non-deductible)/deductible in calculating taxable income:
Sundry non-deductible expenses
Share based payments
Research and development concession
Adjustment for prior periods

3,692

26,709

Effect of currency translation on tax base

80,739

61,523

Tax losses previously not recognised

(1,756)

83,413

(312,513)

1,770

(298)

-

(298)

-

Aggregate current and deferred tax arising in the reporting period and not recognised in net profit or loss or other comprehensive income but directly credited to equity:
Net deferred tax - credited directly to equity

(c) Tax consolidation legislation
Fortescue Metals Group Limited and its wholly-owned Australian controlled entities have implemented the tax consolidation legislation. The accounting policy in relation to this legislation is set out in note 1(g).
On adoption of the tax consolidation legislation, the entities in the tax consolidated group entered into a tax sharing agreement which, in the opinion of the directors, limits the joint and several liability of the wholly-owned entities in the case of a default by the head entity, Fortescue Metals Group Limited.
The entities have also entered into a tax funding agreement under which the wholly-owned entities fully compensate
Fortescue Metals Group Limited for any current tax payable assumed and are compensated by Fortescue Metals Group
Limited for any current tax receivable and deferred tax assets relating to unused tax losses or unused tax credits that are transferred to Fortescue Metals Group Limited under the tax consolidation legislation. The funding amounts are determined by reference to the amounts recognised in the wholly-owned entities’ financial statements.
The amounts receivable or payable under the tax funding agreement are due upon receipt of the funding advice from the head entity, which is issued as soon as practicable after the end of each financial year. The head entity may also require payment of interim funding amounts to assist with its obligations to pay tax instalments. The funding amounts are recognised as non-current intercompany receivables or payables.

93

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

2011
US$'000

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 9. Cash and cash equivalents

Short-term deposits
94

US$'000

12

8

427,402

1,235,530

2,235,305

-

2,662,719

Cash at bank

2010

US$'000
Cash on hand

2011

1,235,538

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Cash equivalents include short-term deposits with an original maturity of six months or less.
Cash and cash equivalents balances at 30 June 2011 do not have any restrictions by contractual or legal arrangements
(2010: nil).

Note 10. Trade and other receivables - current

2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

195,261

102,503

35,375

16,048

Security deposits

137,014

84,993

Other receivables

32,081

8,712

399,731

212,256

Trade debtors
GST receivables

Information about Fortescue and its exposure to foreign currency risk, interest rate risk and price risk are disclosed in note 3. Due to the short term nature of these receivables, their carrying value is assumed to approximate their fair value.
Disclosures relating to receivables from related parties are set out in note 31.

(a) Past due but not impaired
As at 30 June 2011, trade receivables of US$44.7 million (2010: US$8.0 million) were past due but not impaired. These relate to a number of independent customers for whom there is no recent history of default. The ageing analysis of these trade receivables is as follows:
2011
US$'000
Less than 30 days
Between 30 and 60 days
Between 60 and 90 days

2010
US$'000

37,363

1,257

3,790

512

3,515

6,207

44,668

7,976

The other classes within trade and other receivables do not contain impaired assets and are not past due. Based on the credit history of these other classes, it is expected that these amounts will be received when due.

94

Receivables that are classified as past due are those that have not been settled within the normal terms and conditions that have been agreed with the customer. None of the receivables past due in the above table are impaired.

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 11. Trade and other receivables - non-current

2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

Amounts held pending arbitration of shipping contracts

1,581

2,848

Employee housing loans

3,177

1,030

12,202

-

16,960

3,878

2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

86,520

51,759

330,018

136,532

416,538

188,291

Other

95

None of the non-current receivables are impaired or past due but not impaired.

Note 12. Inventories
Raw materials and stores - at cost
Iron ore stockpiles - at cost

Inventories included in cost of sales during the year ended 30 June 2011 amounted to US$1,743.0 million (2010:
US$1,180.9 million)

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

The fair value of the non-current receivables approximates their carrying value.

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 13. Property, plant and equipment

Property, plant and equipment Land and buildings Total

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

1,292,740

74,647

1,367,387

64,774

25,622

90,396

30 June 2010
Opening net book value
96

Transfers of assets at cost

14,954

-

14,954

Disposals
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Additions

(17,097)

(7,696)

(24,793)

Impairment*

(3,540)

(3)

(3,543)

Depreciation

(75,549)

(4,749)

(80,298)

1,276,282

87,821

1,364,103

Cost

1,380,972

95,158

1,476,130

Accumulated depreciation

(104,690)

(7,337)

(112,027)

1,276,282

87,821

1,364,103

Closing net book value
At 30 June 2010

Net book value
30 June 2011
Opening net book value

1,276,282

87,821

1,364,103

Transfers of assets at cost

168,013

23,894

191,907

Additions

242,101

-

242,101

Disposals

-

(12,486)

(12,486)

(111,446)

(3,240)

(114,686)

1,574,950

95,989

1,670,939

Cost

1,791,087

106,552

1,897,639

Accumulated depreciation

(216,137)

(10,563)

(226,700)

1,574,950

95,989

1,670,939

Depreciation
Closing net book value
At 30 June 2011

Net book value

* Impairment losses relate to certain assets no longer in use . The whole amount was recognised in profit and loss as there was no amount included in the asset revaluation surplus relating to the assets.
Transfers of assets at cost comprise transfers between the categories of property, plant and equipment, intangible assets and exploration, evaluation and development costs.
Property, plant and equipment includes assets held under finance leases of US$200.7 million (2010: US$12.8 million).
The details of finance leases under which these assets are held are disclosed in note 23.

96

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 14. Exploration, evaluation and development expenditure
Exploration
and evaluation Assets under Development development Total

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

Opening net book value

11,889

369,475

1,328,280

1,709,644

Transfers of assets at cost

-

(90,396)

820

(89,576)

Additions

17,607

468,406

54,529

540,542

Depreciation and amortisation

-

-

(71,302)

(71,302)

Closing net book value

29,496

747,485

1,312,327

2,089,308

Exploration and evaluation

Assets under Development development Total

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

29,496

747,485

1,312,327

2,089,308

-

(220,382)

18,620

(201,762)

112,637

1,351,364

96,257

1,560,258

Capitalised interest

-

42,577

-

42,577

Foreign exchange movements taken to reserves

-

(16,555)

-

(16,555)

30 June 2011
Opening net book value
Transfers of assets at cost
Additions

Depreciation and amortisation
Closing net book value

-

-

(51,400)

(51,400)

142,133

1,904,489

1,375,804

3,422,426

The recoverable amount of assets under development and development expenditure is determined as the higher of its fair value less costs to sell and its value in use (discounted cash flows).
Interest capitalised is calculated as effective interest expense on specific borrowings for qualifying assets.
Transfers of assets at cost comprise transfers between the categories of property, plant and equipment, intangible assets and exploration, evaluation and development costs.
The recoverability of the carrying amount of the exploration and evaluation assets is dependent on successful development and commercial exploitation, or alternatively, sale of the respective areas of interest.

97

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

US$'000
30 June 2010

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 15. Intangible assets

2011
US$'000

Transfers to development

US$'000

22,750

Opening net book value

2010

25,144
(1,574)

Impairment

(7,553)

-

21,315

22,750

Computer software - at cost
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

(820)

(3,737)

Closing net book value

98

9,855

Amortisation

25,052

24,698

Accumulated amortisation

(3,737)

(1,948)

Closing net book value

21,315

22,750

Note 16. Deferred taxes
The composition and movement of deferred tax assets and liabilities is as follows:
Balance
Charged/
1 July (credited)
2009 to profit or loss Charged/
(credited)
to equity

Balance
Charged/
30 June (credited)
2010 to profit or loss Charged/
(credited)
to equity

Balance
30 June
2011

US$'000
Exploration expenditure
Depreciation and amortisation Inventories
Net unrealised foreign exchange (gains)/losses
Finance costs
Borrowings
Accruals
Provisions
Business related costs
Share based payments
Other items
Revenue tax losses

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

(4,813)

4,886

-

73

(41,268)

-

(41,195)

(189,472)

(5,565)

-

(195,037)

(99,613)

-

(294,650)

-

(10,929)

-

(10,929)

(15,027)

-

(25,956)

5,309

(39,538)

-

(34,229)

54,141

-

19,912

(13,726)

19,290

-

5,564

(5,064)

-

500

91,038

17,172

-

108,210

109,826

-

218,036

-

1,817

-

1,817

(1,417)

-

400

38,917

(7,770)

-

31,147

(6,257)

-

24,890

793

268

-

1,061

(358)

-

703

-

-

-

-

2,082

1,769

3,851

(2,487)

8,107

-

5,620

(10,271)

(1,471)

(6,122)

194,636

14,032

-

208,668

(208,668)

-

-

120,195

1,770

-

121,965

(221,894)

298

(99,631)

98

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 16. Deferred taxes (continued)
Assets

Liabilities

Net assets / (liabilities)

2010

2011

2010

2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

-

73

(41,195)

-

(41,195)

73

71,574

88,326

(366,224)

(283,363)

(294,650)

(195,037)

-

519

(25,956)

(11,448)

(25,956)

(10,929)

19,912

-

-

(34,229)

19,912

(34,229)

500

5,564

-

-

500

5,564

218,036

260,358

-

(152,148)

218,036

108,210

400

1,912

-

(95)

400

1,817

24,890

31,293

-

(146)

24,890

31,147

703

1,061

-

-

703

1,061

Share based payments

3,851

-

-

-

3,851

-

Other items

8,464

6,044

(14,586)

(424)

(6,122)

5,620

-

208,668

-

-

-

208,668

348,330

603,818

(447,961)

(481,853)

(99,631)

121,965

Exploration expenditure
Depreciation and amortisation
Inventories
Net unrealised foreign exchange gains/(losses) Finance costs
Borrowings
Accruals
Provisions
Business related costs

Revenue tax losses

Tax losses
At 30 June 2011, Fortescue had capital tax losses of US$18.3 million (2010: US$18.3 million) on which Fortescue has not recognised a deferred tax asset.
As at 30 June 2011 Fortescue has utilised all carried forward revenue losses (2010: US$695.7 million).

Note 17. Trade and other payables - current

Note 18. Trade and other payables - non-current
Customer deposits

63,020

92,600

106,177

482,149

273,283
442,480

2011

2010

US$'000

Other payables and accruals

US$'000

237,861

812,610

Customer deposits

2010

US$'000
Trade payables

2011

US$'000

184,424

265,615

184,424

265,615

99

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

2011

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 19. Borrowings - current

2011
Notes

2010

US$'000

US$'000

Secured
Senior secured notes

20(c)

100

-

59,175

-

Total secured current borrowings

59,175

Unsecured
20(a)

79,971

-

Unsecured loan notes
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Senior unsecured notes

20(b)

113,835

165,279

Preference shares

20(d)

3,340

2,700

Total unsecured current borrowings

197,146

167,979

Total current borrowings

197,146

227,154

All borrowings are interest bearing. Information about Fortescue’s exposure to interest rate risk and foreign exchange rate risk can be found in note 3.

Note 20. Borrowings - non-current

2011

2010

Notes

US$'000

US$'000

20(c)

-

1,969,917

-

1,969,917

Secured
Senior secured notes
Total secured non-current borrowings
Unsecured
Senior unsecured notes

20(a)

3,484,589

-

Unsecured loan notes

20(b)

830,078

660,961

Preference shares

20(d)

150,563

117,631

Total unsecured non-current borrowings

4,465,230

778,592

Total non-current borrowings

4,465,230

2,748,509

(a) Senior Unsecured Notes
On 7 October 2010, Fortescue entered into a Senior Unsecured Syndicated Facility (Syndicated Facility) of US$2,040 million. The net proceeds together with cash on hand were used to satisfy and discharge the Senior Secured Notes issued in 2006.
On 29 October 2010, Fortescue, through its wholly owned subsidiary FMG Resources (August 2006) Pty Limited, completed an offering for US$2,040 million of unsecured loan notes due November 1, 2015. The net proceeds from the offering together with cash on hand were used to refinance the Syndicated Facility.

100

On 13 December 2010, a further offering for US$1,500 million of unsecured loan notes was completed through the same subsidiary comprising US$600 million due in February 2016 and US$900 million due in February 2018. The net proceeds will be used to facilitate the planned expansion of the existing operations at the Chichester Hub, the initial development of the Solomon Hub and the continued development of the Group’s rail and port infrastructure.
The key terms and conditions of the notes are:


$US2,040 million of senior unsecured notes due November 1, 2015 bearing interest at seven per cent per annum accruing from November 8, 2010. Interest is payable on May 1 and November 1 of each year, beginning on
May 1, 2011.



$US600 million of senior unsecured notes due February 1, 2016 bearing interest at 6.375 per cent per annum accruing from 15 December 2010. Interest is payable on February 1 and August 1 of each year, beginning on 1
August 2011.



$US900 million of senior unsecured notes due February 1, 2018 bearing interest at 6.875 per cent per annum accruing from 15 December 2010. Interest is payable on February 1 and August 1 of each year, beginning on 1 August 2011.

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 20. Borrowings - non-current (continued)
Other key terms of the notes are:


The notes are senior in right of payment to all future subordinated indebtedness of the Company;



The notes rank pari passu in right of payment with all other existing and future senior indebtedness of the
Company;



The notes are unconditionally guaranteed on a senior unsecured basis by the Company and certain of its subsidiaries. 101

On 15 July 2006, Leucadia National Corporation subscribed for US$100 million of unsecured loan notes issued by
Chichester Metals Pty Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of Fortescue Metals Group Limited. The key terms and conditions of the notes are:


Interest payable under the note is calculated as four per cent of the revenue, net of government royalties, from the sale of iron ore FOB Port Hedland from the tenements of the Cloudbreak and Christmas Creek areas only. The first payment was made in July 2010; and



The principal of US$100 million is repayable in full in August 2019.

The carrying amount of the note was re-estimated at 30 June 2011 to US$943.9 million (2010: US$826.2 million) in line with changes in the following management estimates, prevailing market conditions and economic forecasts:


Production was revised to reflect Fortescue’s forecast production profile as at 30 June 2011 from Cloudbreak and
Christmas Creek areas;



Future iron ore prices were updated to reflect forecasts provided by Metalytics Pty Limited, an independent resource sector analyst of future iron ore prices;



The discount rate has been applied since inception and reflects the implicit interest rate of 42 per cent of the subordinated loan note;



It is expected that royalty rates payable to Western Australian state government will increase from 5.625 per cent to
6.5 per cent starting 1 July 2012 and from 6.5 per cent to 7.5 per cent starting 1 July 2013; and



The total reserve estimate of Cloudbreak and Christmas Creek areas.

(c) Senior Secured Notes
In August 2006, FMG Resources (August 2006) Pty Limited, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, raised US$1,650 million in US dollar denominated and €315 million in Euro denominated Senior Secured Notes to fund the development and initial operation of the Cloudbreak and Christmas Creek mines and related port and rail infrastructure.
In November 2010 the Senior Secured Notes were redeemed, using cash on hand and the net proceeds from the
Syndicated Facility.
The key terms and conditions of the Senior Secured Notes were:


US$320 million of senior secured notes due 2013 bearing interest at 10.000% per annum accruing from August
18, 2006. Interest payable on March 1 and September 1 of each year, beginning on March 1, 2007.



€315 million of senior secured notes due 2013 bearing interest at 9.750% per annum accruing from August 18,
2006. Interest payable on March 1 and September 1 of each year, beginning on March 1, 2007.



US$1,080 million of senior secured notes due 2016 bearing interest at 10.625% per annum accruing from August
18, 2006. Interest payable on March 1 and September 1 of each year, beginning on March 1, 2007.



US$250 million of senior secured notes due 2011 bearing interest at three month LIBOR plus 4.000% per annum, accruing from August 18, 2006. Interest payable on March 1, June 1, September 1 and December 1 of each year, beginning on December 1, 2006. Fortescue had a floating-to-fixed interest rate swap over its US$250 million senior secured notes due 2011, swapping these notes to a fixed rate of nine per cent per annum. the interest rate swap was settled as part of the redemption of the Senior Secured Notes.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

(b) Unsecured loan notes

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 20. Borrowings - non-current (continued)
Other key terms of the note were:


They ranked pari passu in right of payment with all existing and future senior indebtedness.



They were secured by, among other security documents, fixed and floating charges over the assets of FMG
Resources (August 2006) Pty Limited, (previously FMG Finance Pty Limited), and the project-related assets of
Chichester Metals Pty Limited (previously FMG Chichester Pty Limited), Pilbara Mining Alliance Pty Limited and
The Pilbara Infrastructure Pty Limited (the “Project Guarantors”), a charge, assignment or pledge over the bank accounts in which proceeds of the senior secured notes were deposited, share mortgages over all of the shares in the capital of the Project Guarantors and FMG Resources (August 2006) Pty Limited, a featherweight charge over all of the assets and undertakings of Fortescue and mortgages of the real property leasehold rights of the
Project and the Project mining tenements.



Prior to redemption the notes were listed on the Singapore Stock Exchange.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

102

(d) Preference shares recognised as debt
The Company issued 1,400 fully paid non-converting, redeemable preference shares at a price of $A100,000 per share on 30 September 2008. A holder of preference shares is not entitled to share in the distribution of any surplus assets of the Company beyond its redemption amount. The preference shares rank in priority to Fortescue’s ordinary shares for the payment of distributions in accordance with these terms.
The preference shares confer upon the holder the right in a winding up or return of capital to payment of an amount equal to the redemption amount, in priority to any other class of shares ranking behind it.
The preference shares shall rank pari passu with the most senior ranking preference shares of the Company and in priority to all other preference shares that are expressed to rank junior to the preference shares and the Company’s ordinary shares, in a winding up of the Company.
The key terms for these preference shares are;


Dividend coupon rate of nine per cent fixed per annum payable six monthly either in cash, or where cash distributions are not able to be made by Fortescue, additional preference shares or ordinary shares (calculated on the basis of the volume weighted average share price) as elected by Fortescue;



Term of 8.5 years;



Redeemable by Fortescue at any time subject to minimum 30 days notice;



Preference shares to rank in priority to Fortescue’s ordinary shares on a winding up and in relation to the payment of distributions; and



Limited voting rights.

(e) Credit facilities
Fortescue entered into a syndicated loan facility in June 2011. Refer to note 3(c) for the details of the facility.

102

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 20. Borrowings - non-current (continued)

(f) Summary of movements in borrowings
Unsecured
loan notes

Senior secured notes

Senior unsecured notes

Total

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

114,809

381,631

2,073,865

-

2,570,305

10,911

164,623

201,207

-

376,741

Interest payments

-

-

(193,254)

-

(193,254)

Re-estimation of unsecured loan notes

-

279,986

-

-

279,986

30 June 2010
Balance at 1 July 2009
Interest expense

Foreign exchange loss/(gain)

5,318

-

(52,726)

-

(47,408)

Interest repayments in the form of ordinary shares

(10,707)

-

-

-

(10,707)

Balance at 30 June 2010

120,331

826,240

2,029,092

-

2,975,663

120,331

826,240

2,029,092

-

2,975,663

-

-

-

3,481,638

3,481,638

Interest expense

14,639

266,158

46,601

155,115

482,513

Interest repayments

(6,170)

(241,331)

(127,820)

(72,193)

(447,514)

-

92,846

-

-

92,846

Foreign exchange loss

31,011

-

41,650

-

72,661

Interest repayments in the form of ordinary shares

(5,908)

-

-

-

(5,908)

-

-

(1,989,523)

-

(1,989,523)

153,903

943,913

-

3,564,560

4,662,376

2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

-

16,285

-

16,285

30 June 2011
Balance at 1 July 2010
Initial recognition

Re-estimation of unsecured loan notes

Redemption of senior secured notes
Balance at 30 June 2011

The carrying amount of borrowings approximates their fair value at the reporting date.

Note 21. Derivatives held at fair value
Interest rate derivative held at fair value

The interest rate derivative held at fair value was settled in December 2010.

103

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Preference shares NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 22. Provisions
In accordance with State Government legislative requirements, a provision for site rehabilitation has been recognised in relation to Fortescue’s iron ore operations. The provision has been made in full for all disturbed areas at the reporting date based on current estimates of costs to rehabilitate such areas, discounted to their present value based on expected future cash flows.
104

Movements in provisions during the financial year are set out below:
2010

US$'000
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

2011

US$'000

Carrying amount at 1 July

57,034

55,582

Additional provision recognised

55,590

-

3,534

1,452

15,955

-

132,113

57,034

2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

17,096

12,844

Accretion expense
Impact of foreign exchange revaluation
Carrying amount at 30 June

Note 23. Other financial liabilities
Other financial liabilities - current
Finance lease liabilities
Other financial liabilities

57

-

17,153

12,844

191,519

-

1,118

479

192,637

479

After five years Total

Other financial liabilities - non-current
Finance lease liabilities
Other financial liabilities

(a) Finance lease liabilities
Within one
Between
year one and five years 104

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

US$'000

12,923

-

-

12,923

(79)

-

-

(79)

12,844

-

-

12,844

32,998

152,303

114,227

299,528

(15,902)

(59,255)

(15,756)

(90,913)

17,096

93,048

98,471

208,615

30 June 2010
Future minimum lease payments
Effect of discounting
Present value of minimum lease payments
30 June 2011
Future minimum lease payments
Effect of discounting
Present value of minimum lease payments

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 24. Contributed equity
(a) Share capital
2011
3,113,498,151

Ordinary shares fully paid

2010
3,107,196,989
105

Date
1 July 2009

Details
Opening balance
Shares issued
Exercise of options issued under the
Fortescue Metals Group Incentive
Option Scheme
Transfer of option expense from reserve for converted options

30 June 2010
1 July 2010

Balance
Opening balance

Number of shares Issue price

3,089,596,699

US$'000
1,229,876

10,682,660

$3.83

40,977

6,917,630

$0.33

2,211

-

1,586

3,107,196,989

1,274,650

3,107,196,989

1,274,650

Shares issued

3,917,412

$4.47

17,523

Exercise of options issued under the
Fortescue Metals Group Incentive
Option Scheme

2,383,750

$0.76

1,815

Transfer of option expense from reserve for converted options
30 June 2011

Balance

-

1,045

3,113,498,151

1,295,033

(c) Ordinary shares
Fully paid ordinary shares entitle the holder to participate in dividends and to one vote per share at meetings of the
Company. Ordinary shares participate in the proceeds on winding up of the Company in proportion to the number of shares held.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

(b) Movements in ordinary share capital

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 25. Reserves
(a) Reserves
2011

2010

US$'000
3,437

-

Share-based payments reserve

106

US$'000

Hedging reserve

9,161

2,155

740

678

-

(77,202)

13,338

(74,369)

2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

Asset revaluation reserve
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Foreign currency translation reserve

Movements
Hedging reserve
Balance 1 July
Net cash flow hedge fair value gains, net of deferred tax
Net cash flow hedge movements reclassified on recognition of non-financial hedged assets, net of deferred tax
Balance 30 June

-

-

15,026

-

(11,589)

-

3,437

-

Share-based payments reserve
Balance 1 July

2,155

1,970

(1,045)

(1,586)

(15)

(456)

Share options expense accrued for unvested options

6,295

2,227

Deferred tax

1,771

-

Balance 30 June

9,161

2,155

678

610

Exercise of options
Forfeited options

Asset revaluation reserve
Balance 1 July
Revaluation of available for sale financial assets
Balance 30 June

106

62

68

740

678

(77,202)

(77,202)

77,202

-

-

(77,202)

Foreign currency translation reserve
Balance 1 July
Transfer resulting from change in tax functional currency
Balance 30 June

(b) Nature and purpose of reserves
(i) Hedging reserve

The hedging reserve represents hedging gains and losses recognised on the effective portion of cash flow hedges, net of deferred tax. The cumulative deferred gain or loss on the hedge is recognised as an adjustment to the initial cost of non-financial hedged items.

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(ii) Share based payments reserve

The share based payments reserve records items recognised as expenses on valuation of employee share options. The movement in the share based payments reserve is disclosed in the Statements of Changes in Equity.

(iii) Asset revaluation reserve

The asset revaluation reserve records revaluations of non-current assets held at fair value and revaluations of available-for-sale financial investments.
107

(iv) Foreign currency translation reserve

Note 26. Dividends
(a) Dividend paid during the year

2010

US$'000

US$'000

95,820

-

2011

2010

US$'000

Interim unfranked dividend for the half-year ended 31 December 2010: A$0.03 per share (31 December 2009: nil)

2011

US$'000

128,837

-

At 30 June 2011 Fortescue had no franking credits available (2010: nil).

(b) Dividend proposed and not recognised as a liability
Fully franked dividend for the year ended 30 June 2011: A$0.04 per share (2010: nil)

Note 27. Key management personnel
(a) Key management personnel remuneration
The Key Management Personnel remuneration included within ‘administration expenses’ in the Statement of
Comprehensive Income are as follows:
2011
US$000
Short-term employee benefits
Post-employment benefits
Share-based payments
Equity compensation benefits

2010
US$000

8,122

4,227

608

303

5,560

1,073

4,375

-

18,665

5,603

Detailed remuneration disclosures are provided in the remuneration report.
Balances above are recognised on a gross basis. Wages and salaries, disclosed as part of administration expenses in the profit and loss statement, are recognised net of salary recoveries.
Apart from the details disclosed in this note, no Director has entered into a material contract with the Company or
Fortescue since the end of the previous financial year and there were no material contracts involving Directors’ interests existing at year end.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Foreign currency differences arising on the revaluation of Australian deferred tax assets and liabilities to US dollar deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognised directly in equity in the foreign currency translation reserve.

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 27. Key management personnel (continued)

(b) Equity instrument disclosures relating to key management personnel
(i) Options over equity instruments

The movement during the reporting period in the number of options over ordinary shares in the Company held directly, indirectly or beneficially, by each of the Key Management Personnel, including their related parties, is as follows:
108

2010
Name

Balance at
Granted as start of the compensation year Exercised Other changes during the year

Balance at end of the year Vested

Unvested

Not exercisable FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Directors of Fortescue Metals Group Limited
A Forrest

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

600,000

-

-

-

600,000

150,000

450,000

600,000

G Rowley

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

H Elliott

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

K Ambrecht

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

G Brayshaw

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

O Hegarty

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

I Burston

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

L Xiaowei

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

M Barnaba

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

I Cumming

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

R Scrimshaw

Other key management personnel of the Company
P Hallam

600,000

-

-

-

600,000

150,000

450,000

600,000

S Pearce

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

W Ramsey

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

P Meurs

-

7,500,000

-

-

7,500,000

-

7,500,000

7,500,000

I Buitendag

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Vested

Unvested

Not exercisable 2011
Name

Balance at start of the year Granted as Exercised Other changes compensation during the year

Balance at end of the year Directors of Fortescue Metals Group Limited
A Forrest

108

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

600,000

-

-

-

600,000

300,000

300,000

300,000

G Rowley

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

H Elliott

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

K Ambrecht

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

G Brayshaw

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

O Hegarty

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

I Burston

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

L Xiaowei

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

M Barnaba

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

I Cumming

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

300,000

R Scrimshaw*

Other key management personnel of the Company
P Hallam

600,000

-

(150,000)

-

450,000

150,000

300,000

S Pearce

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

P Meurs

7,500,000

-

-

-

7,500,000

2,187,500

5,312,500

7,500,000

W Ramsey

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

N Power

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

* Russell Scrimshaw retired as an executive director effective 30 June 2011. Russell has accepted Fortescue’s invitation to remain a non-executive director and has also agreed, at the Company’s request, to provide on-going advisory services.

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 27. Key management personnel (continued)
(ii) Share holdings

The movement during the reporting period in the number of ordinary shares in the Company held directly, indirectly or beneficially, by each Key Management Person, including their related parties, are set out below.
2010
Name

Held at 1 Received on
July 2009 exercise of options Issued as part of
Senior Staff
Executive
scheme

Purchases

Sales

Transfers

Other

Held at 30
June 2010

109

A Forrest
R Scrimshaw
H Elliott

972,828,300

-

-

-

-

-

1,915

972,830,215

8,000,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

8,000,000

2,167,938

-

-

-

-

-

-

2,167,938

19,235,690

-

-

500,000

(500,000)

-

-

19,235,690

K Ambrecht

6,313,130

-

-

-

-

-

-

6,313,130

G Brayshaw

33,149

-

-

11,000

-

-

-

44,149

L Xiaowei

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

M Barnaba

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

I Cumming

-

-

-

-

-

277,986,000 (277,986,000)

-

J Steinberg

277,986,000

-

-

-

- (277,986,000)

-

-

8,300

-

-

-

8,300

G Rowley

Other key management personnel of the Company
S Pearce

-

-

-

P Hallam

-

-

-

-

-

-

10,157

10,157

P Meurs

-

-

-

7,500,000

-

-

-

7,500,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

375,000

-

8,802

25,000

-

-

-

408,802

Held at 1 Received on
July 2010 exercise of options Issued as part of
Senior Staff
Executive
scheme

Purchases

Sales

Transfers

Other

Held at 30
June 2011

I Buitendag
W Ramsey

2011
Name

Directors of Fortescue Metals Group Limited
A Forrest

972,830,215

-

18,608

-

-

(8,000,000)

-

964,848,823

R Scrimshaw

8,000,000

-

89,526

529

(500,000)

-

-

7,590,055

H Elliott

2,167,938

-

-

-

-

-

-

2,167,938

19,235,690

-

-

31,832

(122,571)

-

-

19,144,951

K Ambrecht

6,313,130

-

-

-

-

(10,100)

-

6,303,030

G Brayshaw

52,149

G Rowley

44,149

-

-

8,000

-

-

-

O Hegarty

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

I Burston

-

-

-

20,000

-

-

-

20,000

L Xiaowei

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

M Barnaba

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

I Cumming

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Other key management personnel of the Company
S Pearce

8,300

-

36,447

-

-

-

866

45,613

P Hallam

10,157

150,000

86,510

-

-

-

-

246,667

7,500,000

-

-

652,882

-

-

-

8,152,882

408,802

-

293,900

-

-

-

-

702,702

-

-

-

50,000

-

-

-

50,000

P Meurs
W Ramsey
N Power

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Directors of Fortescue Metals Group Limited

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 27. Key management personnel (continued)

(c) Other transactions with directors and key management personnel

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

110

Dr Ian Burston was appointed as a Non-Executive Director of Fortescue Metals Group Limited on 13 October 2008. He is also Chairman and Director of NRW Holdings Limited (NRW). NRW provide mining contracting services to Fortescue’s
Cloudbreak and Christmas Creek mines. Fortescue has incurred US$179.5 million for services rendered by NRW during the financial year (2010: US$73.3 million). As at 30 June 2011 amounts owed to NRW by Fortescue were US$16.6 million
(2010: nil).

Note 28. Remuneration of auditors

2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

Audit and review

470

343

Other assurance services

155

21

Agreed upon procedures

217

-

Total remuneration of BDO Audit (WA) Pty Ltd

842

364

73

-

915

364

Audit services
BDO Audit (WA) Pty Ltd
Audit and other assurance services

Other services

Other audit firms
Audit and other assurance services
Audit of financial statements
Total auditors' remuneration

Note 29. Contingent liabilities
ASIC Proceedings

On 23 December 2009, judgement was handed down by the Federal Court in the civil penalty proceedings brought by
ASIC. Fortescue and Fortescue’s co-defendant, Mr. Andrew Forrest, were successful and all of the contraventions alleged by ASIC were dismissed by the Federal Court. ASIC appealed (Appeal) the decision and the Appeal was heard by the Full
Federal Court in November 2010.

110

On 18 February 2011, the Full Federal Court upheld the Appeal. In response, on 18 March 2011, Fortescue and Mr.
Forrest lodged an application for special leave to appeal to the High Court. The special leave hearing is likely to be heard on 29 September 2011, and if successful will then lead to a full hearing of Fortescue’s and Mr. Forrest’s appeal in the High Court during 2012. If the application for special leave is unsuccessful, then the matter will proceed to a penalty hearing before a judge of the Federal Court based on the contraventions found by the Full Federal Court.
These proceedings and the decision by the Full Federal Court in respect of the Appeal by ASIC are civil and not criminal, with maximum penalties sought by ASIC of approximately A$6 million from Fortescue and A$4.4 million from Mr.
Forrest personally. ASIC have applied for orders to make Mr. Forrest personally liable for any civil penalties or costs imposed upon Fortescue, and to also disqualify Mr. Forrest from managing corporations.

Leucadia National Corporation (Leucadia) – Interest Calculation Dispute

Leucadia has disputed the method used by Fortescue to calculate the interest payable on the unsecured loan notes
(Leucadia Notes).
The dispute has been submitted to Expert Determination in accordance with the provisions of the governing Note
Deed. The parties are preparing for the hearing, which is expected to take place in late September 2011.
It is not currently possible to provide an accurate estimate of the likely quantum of the dispute.

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 29. Contingent liabilities
Leucadia – Note Issuance Dispute

Leucadia National Corporation and Baldwin Enterprises (Baldwin) have initiated proceedings seeking injunctive orders restraining Chichester Metals Pty Limited (Chichester) and Fortescue from issuing or causing to be issued additional notes under the Note Deed Poll and seeking orders against Chichester, Fortescue and Mr. Forrest.
On 18 August 2006, Chichester issued loan notes, guaranteed by Fortescue, in the principal amount of US$100 million to Leucadia under the Note Deed Poll. Baldwin is the current holder of the existing Leucadia Notes. Arguably any additional loan notes issued under the terms of the Note Deed Poll would share in the interest calculated on the
Leucadia Notes, and thereby reduce the amount of interest payable to Baldwin on the Leucadia Notes it holds.
On 1 September 2010, Leucadia and Baldwin filed a writ of summons in the Supreme Court of Western Australia, and on 22 October 2010, they filed a statement of claim. Chichester, Fortescue and Mr. Forrest filed their defense on 22
December 2010.
Leucadia also seeks damages for alleged breaches of representations and warranties given by Chichester and Fortescue contained or implied in the Leucadia Subscription Agreement. In relation to Mr. Forrest, Leucadia seeks damages from
Mr. Forrest as a person knowingly concerned in the alleged conduct of Chichester and Fortescue.

Note 30. Commitments
(a) Capital commitments
At 30 June 2011 Fortescue has commitments to capital expenditure contracted for at the reporting date but not recognised as liabilities. Fortescue expects that these contractual commitments for expenditure, together with other expenditure and liquidity requirements will be met from operating cash flows and existing facilities.
2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

2,190,913

89,000

2,598

-

-

-

2,193,511

89,000

2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

Within one year

120,593

124,692

Between one and five years

138,870

243,531

259,463

368,223

Contacted but not provided for in the financial statements and payable:
Within one year
Between one and five years
Later than five years

(b) Operating lease commitments
Operating lease commitments payable:

Fortescue leases various offices and other premises under non-cancellable operating leases expiring within one to seven years. The leases have varying terms, escalation clauses and renewal rights. On renewal, the terms of the leases are renegotiated.
Fortescue also leases various motor vehicles, office equipment and plant and machinery under non-cancellable operating leases. The leases have varying terms.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

111

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 30. Commitments (continued)

(c) Exploration tenement leases - commitments for expenditure
In order to maintain current rights of tenure to exploration tenements, Fortescue is required to outlay lease rentals and to meet the minimum expenditure requirements of US$13.2 million over the next financial year (2010: US$11.7 million).
112

Financial commitments for subsequent periods are contingent upon future exploration results and cannot be estimated. These obligations are subject to renegotiation upon expiry of the exploration leases or when application for a mining licence is made and have not been provided for in the financial statements.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Fortescue’s share of joint venture commitments in relation to exploration tenement leases is disclosed in note 34.

Note 31. Related party transactions
(a) Key management personnel
Disclosure relating to key management personnel are set out in note 27.

(b) Transactions with other related parties
No other transactions have occurred with related parties other than subsidiaries, entities with joint control, directors or key management personnel as disclosed above.

112

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 32. Subsidiaries
The consolidated financial statements incorporate the assets, liabilities and results of the following subsidiaries in accordance with the accounting policy described in note 1(b):
Equity holding

Investment

2011

2011

2010

%
Fortescue Metals Group Limited

2010
%

US$

US$

Australia

Ordinary

-

-

-

-

International Bulk Ports Pty Limited

Australia

Ordinary

100

100

1

1

The Pilbara Infrastructure Pty Limited*

Australia

Ordinary

100

100

-

-

FMG Resources Pty Limited

Australia

Ordinary

100

100

339

339

FMG Pilbara Pty Limited

Australia

Ordinary

100

100

1

1

Chichester Metals Pty Limited**

Australia

Ordinary

100

100

-

-

FMG Resources (August 2006) Pty Limited***

Australia

Ordinary

100

100

-

-

Pilbara Mining Alliance Pty Limited

Australia

Ordinary

100

100

1

1

Karribi Developments Pty Limited

Australia

Ordinary

100

100

1

1

FMG Magnetite Pty Limited

Australia

Ordinary

100

100

1

1

FMG North Pilbara Pty Limited

Australia

Ordinary

100

100

1

1

New Zealand

Ordinary

100

100

1

1

Singapore

Ordinary

100

100

1

1

Pilbara Housing Services Pty Limited

Australia

Ordinary

100

100

1

1

FMG Solomon Pty Limited**

Australia

Ordinary

100

100

-

-

Masters Way Homes Pty Limited****

Australia

Ordinary

100

100

-

-

Hong Kong

Ordinary

100

-

1

-

FMG Iron Bridge (Aust) Pty Limited*****

Australia

Ordinary

100

-

108

-

FMG Air Pty Limited

Australia

Ordinary

100

-

1

-

FMG Capital Pty Limited

Australia

Ordinary

100

-

113

FMG Pacific Limited
FMG International Pte Limited

FMG Iron Bridge Limited

1

-

459

348

* The Pilbara Infrastructure Pty Limited is a subsidiary of International Bulk Ports Pty Limited.
** This entity is a subsidiary of FMG Pilbara Pty Limited.
*** FMG Resources (August 2006) Pty Limited (previously FMG Finance Pty Limited) is a subsidiary of Chichester
Metals Pty Limited.
**** Masters Way Homes Pty Limited is a subsidiary of Pilbara Housing Services Pty Limited.
***** FMG Iron Bridge (Aust) Pty Limited is a subsidary of FMG Iron Bridge Limited.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Controlled entities

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 33. Deed of cross guarantee
Fortescue Metals Group Limited and certain of its subsidiaries are parties to a deed of cross guarantee under which each company guarantees the debts of the others:

Holding Entity

114

Fortescue Metals Group Limited

Group Entities
FMG Pilbara Pty Limited


FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011



Chichester Metals Pty Limited



FMG Resources (August 2006) Pty Limited



FMG Resources Pty Limited



International Bulk Ports Pty Limited



The Pilbara Infrastructure Pty Limited



FMG Solomon Pty Limited

(a) Consolidated statement of comprehensive income and summary of movements in consolidated retained earnings
The statement of comprehensive income and summary movements in consolidated accumulated losses for the year ended 30 June 2011 along with the consolidated balance sheet as at 30 June 2011 for the closed group represented by the above companies are materially the same as that of the consolidated group.

114

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 34. Interests in joint ventures
(a) Jointly controlled assets
Fortescue, through its wholly owned subsidiary FMG Pilbara Pty Limited, holds a 50 per cent participating interest in the
Nullagine Iron Ore Joint Venture. The joint venture’s activity is the production of iron ore in the Pilbara, with Fortescue entitled to receive 50 per cent of the joint venture output. The Group’s interests in the assets employed in the joint venture are included in the balance sheet, in accordance with the accounting policy described in note 1(c), under the following classifications:
2010

US$'000

US$'000

8,353

-

12,843

-

Other current assets

1,791

-

Total current assets

22,987

-

36,283

-

Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents - included in other current assets
Inventories

Non-current assets
Property, plant and equipment
Exploration, evaluation and development expenditure

19,010

-

Total non-current assets

55,293

-

Share of assets employed in joint venture

78,280

-

Trade payables and accruals

16,138

-

Total current liabilities

16,138

-

26,876

-

988

-

Total non-current liabilities

27,864

-

Share of liabilities employed in joint venture

44,002

-

Net assets

34,278

-

Current liabilities

Non-current liabilities
Loans and borrowings
Provisions

Each of the partners in the Nullagine Iron Ore Joint Venture are jointly and severally liable for the debts of the partnership. The assets of the partnership exceed its debts.
As at 30 June 2011, the partnership did not have any contingent liabilities not provided for in the balance sheet.

(b) Fortescue’s share of joint venture commitments
2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

4,027

-

4,027

-

543

-

2,598

-

3,141

-

Capital commitments
Within one year
Exploration expenditure commitments not recognised as a liability
Within one year
Between one and five years

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

2011

115

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 35. Earnings per share
(a) Basic earnings per share

2010

Cents

Cents

32.86

18.85

32.83

18.82

2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

1,022,555

580,946

1,022,555

580,946

2011

2010

Number

From continuing operations attributable to the ordinary equity holders of the
Company

2011

Number

3,111,466,228

3,081,948,244

3,008,326

4,909,872

3,114,474,554

3,086,858,116

116

(b) Diluted earnings per share
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

From continuing operation attributable to the ordinary equity holders of the
Company

Basic earnings per share
Profit attributable to the ordinary equity holders of the Company used in calculating basic earnings per share
Diluted earnings per share
Profit attributable to the ordinary equity holders of the Company used in calculating diluted earnings per share

Weighted average number of ordinary shares used as the denominator in calculating basic earnings per share
Adjustments for calculation of diluted earnings per share:
Potential ordinary shares
Weighted average number of ordinary shares and potential ordinary shares used as the denominator in calculating diluted earnings per share

(i) Options

Options granted to employees under the Fortescue incentive plan are considered to be potential ordinary shares and have been included in the determination of diluted earnings per share to the extent to which they are dilutive. The options have not been included in the determination of basic earnings per share. Details relating to the options are set out in note 36.

Note 36. Share-based payments

116

(a) Employee Option Plan
During the financial year ended 30 June 2011 the Company issued 400,000 employee options (2010: 7,500,000) under two equal tranches (200,000 options per tranche) to an employee. Tranche 1 will vest over a three year period, with
33.3 per cent vesting on each anniversary date. Tranche 2 will vest over a four year period, with 25 per cent vesting on each anniversary date. In addition, the Directors have imposed a further requirement that the exercise price of options is conditional upon Fortescue shares trading above A$7.83 for tranche 1 and A$9.10 for tranche 2 for a period of five consecutive trading days. The options have been issued at the exercise price of A$5.69, which is in accordance with the
Fortescue incentive scheme whereby the exercise price must be at or greater than the volume weighted average price for the five consecutive trading days prior to the grant date, which was 3 December 2010.

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 36. Share-based payments (continued)

Weighted average Number of options exercise price
2011
2011

Weighted average Number of options exercise price
2010
2010

US$

Number

US$

Number

Outstanding at 1 July

3.32

11,577,500

0.73

11,620,380

Exercised during the year

0.76

(2,383,750)

0.33

(6,917,630)

Forfeited during the year

0.57

(43,750)

2.14

(625,250)

Granted during the year

5.69

400,000

4.41

7,500,000

Outstanding at 30 June

4.59

9,550,000

3.32

11,577,500

Exercisable at 30 June

2.70

750,000

0.59

2,727,500

Grant Date

Expiry date

Exercise Balance at price start of the
($A)
year

Granted during the year Exercised during the year Forfeited during the year Balance at Vested and end of the exercisable year at end of the year

2010
25 January 2006
1 June 2006
11 February 2009
13 May 2010

25 January
2011
1 June 2011

$0.569

1,837,500

-

(1,268,750)

-

568,750

568,750

$0.703

2,643,750

-

(935,000)

-

1,708,750

1,708,750

11 February
2014
13 May 2015

$2.50

2,400,000

-

-

(600,000)

1,800,000

450,000

$5.00

-

7,500,000

-

-

7,500,000

-

(600,000) 11,577,500

2,727,500

Total

6,881,250

7,500,000 (2,203,750)

2011
25 January 2006
1 June 2006
11 February 2009
13 May 2010
3 December 2010

25 January
2011
1 June 2011

$0.569

568,750

-

(543,750)

(25,000)

-

-

$0.703

1,708,750

-

(1,690,000)

(18,750)

-

-

11 February
2014
13 May 2015

$2.50

1,800,000

-

(150,000)

-

1,650,000

750,000

$5.00

7,500,000

-

-

-

7,500,000

-

20 September
2015

$5.69

-

400,000

-

-

400,000

-

400,000 (2,383,750)

(43,750)

9,550,000

750,000

Total

Fair value of options granted

11,577,500

The assessed fair value at grant date of options granted during the year ended 30 June 2011 was A$3.88 per option
(2010: A$2.66 per option) for tranche 1 and A$3.87 per option (2010: A$2.65) for tranche 2. The fair value at grant date was determined using a trinomial lattice option pricing model that takes into account the exercise price, the term of the option, the impact of dilution, the share price at grant date, expected price volatility of the underlying share, the effect of additional market conditions, the expected dividend yield and the risk free interest rate for the term of the option.

117

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

During the financial year ended 30 June 2010 the Company issued 7,500,000 employee options under two equal tranches (3,750,000 options per tranche) to a key executive. Tranche 1 vests over a three year period, with 33.3 per cent vesting on each anniversary date. Tranche 2 vests over a four year period, with 25 per cent vesting on each anniversary date. In addition, the Directors have imposed a further requirement that the exercise of options is conditional upon
Fortescue shares trading above A$7.00 for tranche 1 and A$8.00 for tranche 2 for a period of five consecutive days. The options have been issued at an exercise price of A$5.00, which is in accordance with the Fortescue incentive scheme whereby the price must be at or greater than the volume weighted average price for the five days prior to the offer date, which was 13 May 2010.

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 36. Share-based payments (continued)
The model inputs for options granted during the year ended 30 June 2011 included:
(a) grant date: 3 December 2010 (2010: 13 May 2010)
(b) expiry date: 20 September 2015 (2010: 13 May 2015)
(c) exercise price: A$5.69 (2010: A$5.00)
118

(d) price of shares on grant date: A$6.50 (2010: A$4.35)
(e) expected volatility: 62.15 per cent (2010: 76.40 per cent)
(f ) risk-free interest rate: 5.20 per cent (2010: 5.00 per cent)

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

(g) dividend yield: nil

(b) Employee expenses

2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

6,295

1,768

6,295

1,768

2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

292,832

136,223

Employee expenses
Share-based payment expense

Note 37. Parent entity financial information
(a) Summary financial information
The individual financial statements for the parent entity show the following aggregate amounts:

Balance sheet
Current assets
Non-current assets

118

3,450,863

1,472,530

3,743,695

1,608,753

-

99,384

437,111

122,522

437,111

221,906

3,306,584

1,386,847

1,295,033

1,274,649

9,901

(6,598)

2,001,650

118,796

3,306,584

1,386,847

Profit for the year

411,912

179,916

Total comprehensive income for the year

421,343

179,984

Total assets
Current liabilities
Non-current liabilities
Total liabilities
Net assets
Contributed equity
Reserves
Retained earnings
Total equity

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 37. Parent entity financial information (continued)

(b) Guarantees entered into by the parent entity
The parent entity has not provided any financial guarantees other than the cross guarantees given by Fortescue Metals
Group Limited, as described in note 33.
No liability was recognised by the parent entity or the consolidated entity in relation to the cross guarantees, as the fair value of the guarantees is immaterial.

119

The parent entity did not have any contingent liabilities as at 30 June 2011 or 30 June 2010, other than disclosed in note 29. For information about guarantees given by the parent entity, please see above.

Note 38. Reconciliation of profit after income tax to net cash inflow from operating activities
2011

2010

US$'000

US$'000

1,022,555

580,946

169,823

153,174

7,553

3,543

496

(3,612)

Accretion expense

3,534

1,452

Equity settled share-based payment transactions

6,295

1,771

92,846

279,986

312,513

(1,770)

37,195

(83,805)

450,755

383,981

Profit for the year
Depreciation and amortisation
Impairment of obsolete software
Loss / (profit) on disposal of non-current assets

Re-estimation of carrying value of senior unsecured notes
Tax expense / (benefit)
Net foreign exchange loss / (gain)
Add interest expense (disclosed within financing activities)
Add refinancing costs (disclosed within financing activities)

719,201

-

Deduct interest income relating to investing activities

(24,591)

(18,909)

308,639

111,590

Increase in receivables

(113,248)

(47,044)

Increase in inventory

(215,404)

(67,169)

2,778,162

1,294,134

(5,908)

(10,707)

Acquisition of plant and equipment by finance lease

(204,321)

-

Total non-cash financing and investing activities

(210,229)

(10,707)

Working capital adjustments:
Increase in payables and provisions

Net cash inflow from operating activities
Non-cash financing and investing activities
Interest paid by the issue of shares

Note 39. Subsequent events
On 19 August 2011, the Directors declared a final fully franked dividend of four Australian cents per ordinary share payable on 30 September 2011.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

(c) Contingent liabilities of the parent entity

DIRECTORS’ DECLARATION
1.

In the opinion of the directors of Fortescue Metals Group Limited (the Company):
(a) The consolidated financial statements and notes that are set out on pages 34 to 89 and the Remuneration report set out on pages 14 to 31 to the Directors’ report, are in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001, including: (i) complying with Australian Accounting Standards and the Corporations Regulations 2001; and
(ii) giving a true and fair view of the Group’s financial position as at 30 June 2011 and of its performance, for the financial year ended on that date; and

120

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

2.

There are reasonable grounds to believe that the Company and the Group entities identified in note 32 will be able to meet any obligations or liabilities to which they are or may become subject to by virtue of the Deed of Cross
Guarantee between the Company and those Group entities pursuant to ASIC Class Order 98/1418.

3.

This declaration has been made after receiving the declarations required to be made to the directors in accordance with Section 295A of the Corporations Act 2001 for the financial year ended 30 June 2011.

4.

The directors draw attention to note 1(a) to the consolidated financial statements, which includes a statement of compliance with International Financial Reporting Standards.

Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Directors.

Mr Andrew Forrest
Chairman
Dated at Perth this 19th day of August 2011.

120

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT TO THE MEMBERS

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

121

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT TO THE MEMBERS

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

122

122

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

123

SHAREHOLDER INFORMATION
Information as at 28 September 2011

Top 20 Holders of Ordinary Shares
Rank Name
124

Units

% of issued capital

The Metal Group Pty Ltd

811,328,300

26.06

2

HSBC Custody Nominees (Australia) Limited - A/C 2

269,606,025

8.66

3
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

1

Valin Investments (Singapore) Pte Ltd

228,007,497

7.32

4

National Nominees Limited

181,245,947

5.82

5

JP Morgan Nominees Australia Limited

180,385,339

5.79

6

JP Morgan Nominees Australia Limited

177,650,907

5.71

7

Valin Resources Investments (Singapore) Pte Ltd

154,267,590

4.95

8

The Metal Group Pty Ltd

117,500,000

3.77

9

LUK-Fortescue Llc

95,586,000

3.07

10

Emichrome Pty Ltd

91,807,598

2.95

11

Valin Mining Investments (Singapore) Pte Ltd

80,910,892

2.60

12

Citicorp Nominees Pty Limited

73,278,125

2.35

13

Leucadia National Corporation

60,000,000

1.93

14

The Metal Group Pty Ltd

36,000,000

1.16

15

HSBC Custody Nominees (Australia) Limited - A/C 2

35,682,396

1.15

16

AMP Life Limited

15,675,707

0.50

17

Cogent Nominees Pty Limited

15,049,231

0.48

18

Mr William Graeme Rowley

12,644,951

0.41

19

UBS Nominees Pty Ltd

9,863,951

0.32

20

WWB Investments Pty Ltd

9,594,815

0.31

2,656,085,271

85.30

Total

124

SHAREHOLDER INFORMATION
Information as at 28 September 2011

Substantial Shareholders
Substantial Shareholder

Total Shares

% of Total Shares

The Metal Group Ltd

964,828,300

30.99

Hunan Valin Iron and Steel Group

468,769,480

15.05

125

Range

Total Holders

Units

% Issued Capital

1-1,000

28,344

15,431,277

0.50

1,001 – 5,000

26,823

69,859,298

2.24

5,001 – 10,000

5,963

46,335,504

1.49

10,001 – 100,000

3,630

89,556,775

2.88

100,000 - max
Total

316

2,892,615,297

92.90

65,076

3,113,798,151

100.00

Unmarketable Parcels
There were 2,775 members holding less than a marketable parcel of shares in the company.

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Range of Shares

TENEMENT REPORT
Information as at 14 September 2011
Western Australian Tenure
Holder: Chichester Metals Pty Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights
E 45/2497

E 45/2593

E 45/2651

E 45/2652

E 45/2708

E 46/467

E 46/516

E 46/518

E 46/567

E 46/568

E 46/569

E 46/590

E 46/595

E 46/600

E 46/601

E 46/610

E 46/612

E 46/623

E 46/664

E 46/675

E 47/1434

M 45/1082

M 45/1083

M 45/1084

M 45/1085

M 45/1086

M 45/1087

M 45/1088

M 45/1089

M 45/1090

M 45/1091

M 45/1092

M 45/1093

M 45/1094

M 45/1102

M 45/1103

M 45/1104

M 45/1105

M 45/1106

M 45/1107

M 45/1124

M 45/1125

M 45/1126

M 45/1127

M 45/1128

M 45/1138

M 45/1139

M 45/1140

M 45/1141

M 45/1142

M 46/292

M 46/293

M 46/314

M 46/315

M 46/316

M 46/317

M 46/318

M 46/319

M 46/320

M 46/321

M 46/322

M 46/323

M 46/324

M 46/325

M 46/326

M 46/327
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

E 45/2499

E 46/566

E 46/611

126

E 45/2498

E 46/519

M 46/328

M 46/329

M 46/330

M 46/331

M 46/332

M 46/333

M 46/334

M 46/335

M 46/336

M 46/337

M 46/338

M 46/339

M 46/340

M 46/341

M 46/342

M 46/343

M 46/344

M 46/345

M 46/346

M 46/347

M 46/348

M 46/349

M 46/350

M 46/351

M 46/352

M 46/353

M 46/354

M 46/355

M 46/356

M 46/357

M 46/401

M 46/402

M 46/403

M 46/404

M 46/405

M 46/406

M 46/407

M 46/408

M 46/409

M 46/410

M 46/411

M 46/412

M 46/413

M 46/414

M 46/415

M 46/416

M 46/417

M 46/418

M 46/419

M 46/420

M 46/421

M 46/422

M 46/423

M 46/424

M 46/449

M 46/450

M 46/451

M 46/452

M 46/453

M 46/454
Holder: Chichester Metals Pty Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: 100% all iron ore rights
E 46/413
Holder: Chichester Metals Pty Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: n/a
G 46/7

L 45/152

L 46/35

L 46/36

L 46/37

L 46/40

L 46/46

L 46/47

L 46/48

L 46/49

L 46/51

L 46/52

L 46/53

L 46/54

L 46/55

L 46/56

L 46/57

L 46/58

L 46/62

L 46/64

L 46/66

L 47/193

L 47/197

L 47/198

Holder: Chichester Metals Pty Ltd Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights
M 45/1147

M 45/1148

M 45/1149

M 45/1150

E 46/666

Holder: Chichester Metals Pty Ltd Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: n/a
L 46/78

L 47/204

L 46/60

Holder: FMG Pilbara Pty Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights

126

E 08/1439

E 08/1440

E 08/1547

E 08/1549

E 08/1624

E 08/1628

E 08/1629

E 08/1630

E 08/1631

E 08/1632

E 08/1741

E 08/1760

E 08/1761

E 08/1762

E 08/1831

E 08/1942

E 08/1949

E 08/1959

E 08/1961

E 08/1985

E 08/1986

E 08/1992

E 08/2003

E 08/2034

E 08/2065

E 08/2114

E 08/2117

E 08/2157

E 08/2193

E 08/2194

E 08/2195

E 08/2196

E 08/2200

E 45/2841

E 45/2843

E 45/2847

E 45/2863

E 45/2864

E 45/2865

E 45/2866

E 45/3270

E 45/3310

E 45/3318

E 45/3328

E 45/3360

E 45/3366

E 45/3369

E 45/3386

E 45/3399

E 45/3412

E 45/3413

E 45/3414

E 45/3421

E 45/3422

E 45/3428

E 45/3429

E 45/3430

E 45/3431

E 45/3433

E 45/3438

E 45/3442

E 45/3443

E 45/3469

E 45/3552

E 45/3561

E 45/3570

E 45/3611

E 45/3650

E 45/3658

E 45/3697

E 45/3698

E 46/517

E 46/621

E 46/694

E 46/695

E 46/696

E 46/697

E 46/698

E 46/699

E 46/700

E 46/701

E 46/702

E 46/703

E 46/704

E 46/706

E 46/708

E 46/715

E 46/716

E 46/725

E 46/726

E 46/727

E 46/728

E 46/729

E 46/741

E 46/776

E 46/799

E 46/805

E 46/832

E 46/859

E 46/870

E 46/871

E 46/872

E 46/882

E 47/1320

E 47/1351

E 47/1355

E 47/1370

E 47/1373

E 47/1375

E 47/1387

E 47/1388

E 47/1420

E 47/1423

E 47/1446

E 47/1447

E 47/1448

E 47/1449

E 47/1532

E 47/1533

E 47/1579

E 47/1623

E 47/1668

E 47/1681

E 47/1688

E 47/1702

E 47/1703

E 47/1735

E 47/1741

E 47/1761

E 47/1763

E 47/1764

E 47/1772

E 47/1808

E 47/1809

E 47/1821

E 47/1832

E 47/1920

E 47/1921

E 47/1923

E 47/1944

E 47/1988

E 47/2026

E 47/2035

E 47/2036

E 47/2037

E 47/2046

E 47/2055

E 47/2056

E 47/2062

E 47/2080

E 47/2085

E 47/2119

E 47/2138

E 47/2143

E 47/2146

E 47/2157

E 47/2159

E 47/2160

E 47/2171

E 47/2172

E 47/2173

E 47/2174

E 47/2177

E 47/2226

E 47/2229

E 47/2234

E 47/2236

E 47/2237

E 47/2238

E 47/2240

E 47/2242

E 47/2243

E 47/2244

E 47/2285

E 47/2292

E 47/2331

E 47/2334

E 47/2378

E 47/2379

E 47/2431

E 47/2442

E 47/2459

E 47/2466

E 47/2470

E 47/2475

E 47/2476

E 52/1779

E 52/1788

E 52/1789

E 52/1790

E 52/1937

E 52/1977

E 52/2113

E 52/2114

E 52/2264

E 52/2277

E 52/2284

E 52/2285

E 52/2290

E 52/2311

E 52/2333

E 52/2340

E 52/2341

E 52/2342

E 52/2353

E 52/2380

E 52/2382

E 52/2393

E 52/2414

E 52/2415

E 52/2416

E 52/2470

E 52/2484

E 52/2486

E 52/2521

E 52/2522

E 52/2527

E 52/2555

E 52/2576

E 52/2594

E 52/2620

E 52/2626

E 52/2637

E 52/2699

WA/14EOS

M 45/1177

M 47/1413

M 47/1431

P 45/2721

P 45/2748

P 45/2749

P 47/1210

P 47/1211

P 47/1237

P 47/1252

P 47/1253

P 47/1257

P 47/1270

P 47/1279

P 47/1286

P 47/1306

P 47/1307

P 47/1308

P 47/1309

P 47/1398

P 47/1399

P 47/1400

P 47/1401

P 47/1402

P 47/1403

P 47/1404

P 47/1405

P 47/1406

P 47/1407

P 47/1408

P 47/1409

P 47/1410

P 47/1411

P 47/1412

P 47/1423

P 47/1427

P 47/1468

P 47/1469

P 47/1470

P 47/1513

P 47/1514

P 47/1555

E 47/1155

E 47/1390

E 47/1391

E 47/1392

E 47/1393

E 47/1395

E 47/1396

E 47/1455

E 47/1479

E 47/1480

E 47/1611

E 47/1612

E 47/1846

E 47/1855

E 47/2241

E 52/1759

E 52/1760

E 52/2034

E 52/2035

TENEMENT REPORT
Information as at 14 September 2011
Western Australian Tenure (continued)
Holder: FMG Pilbara Pty Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights except diamonds
E 47/1333

E 47/1334

E 47/1352

M 47/1409

M 47/1410

M 47/1411

E 47/1372

E 47/1398

E 47/1399

E 47/1436

E 47/1523

E 47/1524

M 47/1408

Holder: FMG Pilbara Pty Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: n/a
G 45/275

G 45/285

G 45/286

L 47/232

L 47/293

L 47/294

L 47/296

L 47/298

L 47/299

L 47/300

L 47/302

L 47/351

L 47/360

L 47/297

L 47/301

L 47/362

L 47/363

L 47/375

L 47/381

L 47/383

L 47/391

L 47/392

L 47/393

127

Holder: FMG Pilbara Pty Ltd Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights
E 08/1548

E 08/1550

E 08/1585

E 08/1623

E 08/1626

E 08/1627

E 08/1633

E 08/1814

E 08/1816

E 08/1878

E 08/1893

E 08/1894

E 08/1895

E 08/1896

E 08/1897

E 08/1898

E 08/1902

E 08/1903

E 08/1904

E 08/1905

E 08/1906

E 08/1907

E 08/1908

E 08/1915

E 08/1916

E 08/1933

E 08/1943

E 08/1950

E 08/1962

E 08/1982

E 08/2000

E 08/2004

E 08/2038

E 08/2039

E 08/2059

E 08/2060

E 08/2061

E 08/2062

E 08/2063

E 08/2067

E 08/2072

E 08/2088

E 08/2137

E 08/2175

E 08/2218

E 08/2250

E 08/2258

E 08/2263

E 08/2284

E 08/2286

E 08/2287

E 08/2293

E 08/2294

E 08/2295

E 08/2296

E 08/2298

E 45/2842

E 45/2844

E 45/2850

E 45/2851

E 45/2852

E 45/2853

E 45/2854

E 45/2855

E 45/2856

E 45/2857

E 45/2858

E 45/2859

E 45/2860

E 45/2861

E 45/2862

E 45/2867

E 45/2870

E 45/2919

E 45/2920

E 45/2945

E 45/2946

E 45/2970

E 45/2971

E 45/2972

E 45/2973

E 45/3191

E 45/3305

E 45/3306

E 45/3307

E 45/3400

E 45/3402

E 45/3417

E 45/3423

E 45/3426

E 45/3441

E 45/3445

E 45/3448

E 45/3463

E 45/3473

E 45/3489

E 45/3535

E 45/3536

E 45/3545

E 45/3591

E 45/3600

E 45/3605

E 45/3606

E 45/3608

E 45/3641

E 45/3654

E 45/3659

E 45/3663

E 45/3664

E 45/3699

E 45/3705

E 45/3711

E 45/3739

E 45/3746

E 45/3760

E 45/3762

E 45/3764

E 45/3767

E 45/3816

E 45/3817

E 45/3825

E 45/3845

E 45/3866

E 45/3938

E 46/711

E 46/724

E 46/735

E 46/743

E 46/861

E 46/862

E 46/878

E 46/889

E 47/1342

E 47/1343

E 47/1349

E 47/1357

E 47/1361

E 47/1363

E 47/1383

E 47/1384

E 47/1397

E 47/1404

E 47/1419

E 47/1433

E 47/1435

E 47/1453

E 47/1500

E 47/1535

E 47/1543

E 47/1549

E 47/1578

E 47/1651

E 47/1652

E 47/1653

E 47/1654

E 47/1655

E 47/1656

E 47/1660

E 47/1665

E 47/1666

E 47/1667

E 47/1669

E 47/1670

E 47/1673

E 47/1674

E 47/1675

E 47/1677

E 47/1679

E 47/1682

E 47/1684

E 47/1685

E 47/1686

E 47/1687

E 47/1690

E 47/1728

E 47/1762

E 47/1773

E 47/1818

E 47/1833

E 47/1843

E 47/1879

E 47/1989

E 47/1990

E 47/1991

E 47/1992

E 47/1993

E 47/1994

E 47/1995

E 47/1996

E 47/1997

E 47/1998

E 47/1999

E 47/2000

E 47/2020

E 47/2061

E 47/2137

E 47/2197

E 47/2198

E 47/2223

E 47/2235

E 47/2239

E 47/2333

E 47/2336

E 47/2337

E 47/2357

E 47/2358

E 47/2369

E 47/2465

E 47/2490

E 47/2491

E 47/2496

E 47/2506

E 47/2507

E 47/2513

E 47/2538

E 47/2546

E 47/2547

E 47/2559

E 47/2560

E 47/2572

E 47/2573

E 47/2574

E 47/2575

E 47/2576

E 47/2577

E 47/2578

E 47/2579

E 47/2584

E 47/2585

E 51/1493

E 52/1984

E 52/2347

E 52/2696

E 69/2722

E 69/2724

E 69/2725

E 69/2726

E 69/2727

E 69/2728

E 69/2729

E 69/2965

M 45/1196

M 47/1404

M 47/1433

M 47/1434

M 47/1441

M 47/1453

M 47/1456

M 47/1457

M 47/1458

M 47/1459

M 47/1461

M 47/1466

P 08/531

P 08/532

P 08/617

P 08/618

P 08/619

P 08/620

P 08/621

P 08/622

P 08/624

P 45/2786

P 45/2787

P 47/1198

P 47/1199

P 47/1261

P 47/1262

P 47/1269

P 47/1278

P 47/1280

P 47/1281

P 47/1282

P 47/1283

P 47/1284

P 47/1285

P 47/1287

P 47/1304

P 47/1305

P 47/1315

P 47/1390

P 47/1391

P 47/1392

P 47/1393

P 47/1394

P 47/1395

P 47/1396

P 47/1397

P 47/1536

P 47/1537

P 47/1545

P 47/1552

P 47/1553

P 47/1554

P 47/1581

P 47/1582

P 47/1583

P 47/1603

P 47/1604

P 47/1605

P 47/1606

P 47/1607

P 47/1608

P 47/1609

P 47/1610

P 47/1612

P 47/1613

P 47/1614

P 47/1615

P 47/1616

P 47/1617

P 47/1618

P 47/1623

P 47/1626

P 47/1633

P 47/1634

P 52/1415

Holder: FMG Pilbara Pty Ltd Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights except diamonds
M 47/1408

M 47/1409

M 47/1410

M 47/1411

M 47/1417

E 47/1398

E 47/1399

Holder: FMG Pilbara Pty Ltd Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: n/a
L 45/240

L 45/241

L 45/242

L 45/243

L 45/244

L 45/245

L 45/246

L 47/295

L 47/350

L 47/361

L 47/367

L 47/368

L 47/382

L 47/394

L 47/395

L 47/396

L 47/397

L 47/471

L 47/472

L 47/473

E 52/1947

E 52/2423

L 47/507
Holder: FMG North Pilbara Pty Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights
E 45/3084
Holder: FMG North Pilbara Pty Ltd Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights
M 45/1211

M 45/1212

M 45/1213

M 45/1184

Holder: FMG Resources Pty Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights
E 04/1534

E 16/420

E 51/1158

E 51/1159

E 51/1165

E 51/1166

E 52/1945

E 52/1946

E 52/2621

E 59/1267

E 59/1275

E 59/1360

E 70/3546

E 70/4013

E 70/4014

E 77/1385

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

E 08/1432

TENEMENT REPORT
Information as at 14 September 2011
Western Australian Tenure (continued)
Holder: FMG Resources Pty Ltd Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights
E 04/1536

E 04/1539

E 04/2129

E 08/2259

E 08/2260

E 08/2261

E 08/2280

E 08/2281

E 09/1873

E 09/1874

E 29/824

E 30/432

E 45/3221

E 45/3222

E 45/3223

E 45/3224

E 45/3226

E 45/3563

E 45/3564

E 45/3565

E 45/3566

E 45/3567

E 45/3568

E 45/3569

E 52/2701

E 57/738

E 57/756

E 59/1279

E 59/1779

E 63/1500

E 63/1501

E 63/1502

E 63/1503

E 63/1504

E 69/2516

E 69/2517

E 69/2518

E 69/2519

E 69/2520

E 69/2521

E 69/2522

E 69/2523

E 69/2524

E 69/2525

E 69/2526

E 69/2527

E 69/2528

E 69/2529

E 69/2530

E 69/2531

E 69/2929

E 69/2930

E 69/2945

E 69/2946

E 69/2947

E 69/2948

E 69/2949

E 69/2950

E 69/2951

E 69/2953

E 69/2954

E 69/2955

E 69/2956

E 69/2960

E 69/2961

E 69/2962
FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

E 04/1538

E 09/1872

E 45/3225

128

E 04/1537

E 08/2282

E 69/2963

E 69/2969

E 69/2970

E 69/2971

E 69/2993

E 74/500

E 74/501

E 74/504

E 74/506

E 77/1906

E 77/1907

E 77/1932

E 77/1954

P 77/4056

P 77/4057

P 77/4058

P 77/4059

P 77/4060

L 45/262

L 45/263

L 45/264

P 47/1174

P 47/1175

P 47/1176

Holder: FMG Magnetite Pty Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights
E 45/2510

E 45/2535

Holder: FMG Magnetite Pty Ltd Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights
E 09/1871
Holder: FMG Magnetite Pty Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: n/a
L 45/268

L 45/269

L 45/270

L 45/271

L 45/272

L 45/273

L 45/274

L 45/257
Holder: Fortescue Metals Group Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: n/a
L 45/158

L 45/191

Holder: Fortescue Metals Group Ltd Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights
E 47/1319

M 45/1180

M 45/1181

M 45/1182

P 47/1177

P 47/1178

P 47/1179

P 47/1180

M 45/1183

P 47/1172

P 47/1173

Holder: The Pilbara Infrastructure Pty Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: n/a
AL 70/1

L 45/199

L 45/222

L 45/223

L 45/224

L 46/86

L 46/87

Holder: The Pilbara Infrastructure Pty Ltd Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: n/a
L 47/516

L 47/517

L 47/518

L 47/519

L 47/520

L 47/521

L 47/522

L 47/523

L 47/524

L 47/525

L 47/526

L 47/527

L 47/528

L 47/529

L 47/530

L 47/531

L 47/532

L 47/533

L 47/534

L 47/535

L 47/536

L 47/537

L 47/538

L 47/539

L 47/540

L 47/541

L 47/542

L 47/424

L 47/425

L 47/426

L 47/427

L 47/428

L 47/429

L 47/430

L 47/431

L 47/432

L 47/433

L 47/434

L 47/435

L 47/436

L 47/437

L 47/438

L 47/439

L 47/440

L 47/441

L 47/442

L 47/443

L 47/444

L 47/445

L 47/446

L 47/447

L 47/448

L 47/449

L 47/450

L 47/451

L 47/452

L 47/453

L 47/454

L 47/455

L 47/456

L 47/457

L 47/458

L 47/459

L 47/460

L 47/461

L 47/462

L 47/463

L 47/464

L 47/465

L 47/466

L 47/467

L 47/468

L 47/469

L 47/470

L 47/474

L 47/475

L 47/476

L 47/477

L 47/478

L 47/479

L 47/480

L 47/481

L 47/482

L 47/483

L 47/484

L 47/485

L 47/486

L 47/487

L 47/488

L 47/489

L 47/490

L 47/491

L 47/492

L 47/493

L 47/494

L 47/495

L 47/496

L 47/497

L 47/498

L 47/499

L 47/500

L 47/501

L 47/502

L 47/503

L 47/504

L 47/505

L 47/506

L 47/508

L 47/509

L 47/510

L 47/511

L 46/96

L 47/415

L 47/329

L 47/330

L 47/331

Holder: Pilbara Iron Ore Pty Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: 50% all mineral rights
E 47/1191

E 47/1192

E 47/1224

E 47/1225

E 47/1235

E 47/1380

P 47/1156

Holder: Pilbara Iron Ore Pty Ltd Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: 50% all mineral rights
M 47/580

M 47/581

M 47/582

Holder: Pilbara Iron Ore Pty Ltd Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: n/a

128

L 47/205
Holder: Derek Ammon Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: 40% all mineral rights
E 47/1140
Holder: Derek Ammon Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: 40% all mineral rights
M 47/583
Holder: David Ryan Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: Option for 100% all mineral rights
P 47/1275
Holder: Contract Power Australia Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: n/a
L46/63
Holder: Cullen Exploration Pty Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: Earning 51% iron ore rights
E 08/1393

E 47/1154

E 47/1649

E 47/1650

E 52/1667

P 08/556

Holder: Flinders Mines Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: 100% iron ore rights
E 47/1011

E 47/1016

E 47/1306

P 47/1414

TENEMENT REPORT
Information as at 14 September 2011
Western Australian Tenure (continued)
Holder: Flinders Mines Ltd Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: 100% iron ore rights
M 47/663

M 47/664

M 47/665

M 47/666

M 47/667

M 47/668

M 47/669

M 47/670

M 47/671

M 47/672

M 47/1407
Holder: Maincoast Pty Ltd Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights
E 47/1461

E 70/2596

129

Holder: Gwalia Tantalum Pty Ltd Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: Earning 60% iron ore rights
E 45/2310
Holder: Blue Mist Enterprises Pty Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights
E 47/1863

Holder: Talisman Mining Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: 100% iron ore rights
E 47/1136

E 47/1194

E 47/1195

E 47/1196

Holder: BC Iron Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: 50% iron ore rights
E 45/2552

E 45/2717

E 46/522

E 46/523

E 46/657

E 46/658

E 46/663

M 46/515

E 46/651

E 46/652

E 46/653

E 46/654

E 46/655

E 46/656

L 46/75

L 46/76

L 46/79

L 46/80

L 46/81

ELA
2011/00155

ELA
2011/00156

ELA
2011/00157

50995

52604

52606

51267

51330

51258

Holder: BC Iron Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: n/a
G 46/8

G 46/9

L 46/68

L 46/73

L 46/74

L 46/82
Holder: Flint, Warrick John Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights
P 47/1316

P 47/1317

P 47/1318

South Australian Tenure
Holder: FMG Resources Pty Ltd Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights
ELA
2011/00130

ELA
2011/00131

ELA
2011/00134

ELA
2011/00135

ELA
2011/00136

ELA
2011/00137

ELA
2011/00154

ELA
2011/00158

Queensland Tenure
Holder: FMG Resources Pty Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: 100% coal rights
EPC 1984
Holder: FMG Resources Pty Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: 100% all coal rights
EPC 1972

EPC 1975

EPC 2010

EPC 2013

EPC 2090

EPC 2321

New Zealand Tenure
Holder: FMG Pacific Pty Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights
50993

50994

50873

50874

50961

50960

Holder: FMG Pacific Pty Ltd Status: Granted FMG mineral rights status: 100% coal rights
50990

51183

51209

51212

51213

51074

53694
Holder: FMG Pacific Pty Ltd Status: Application FMG mineral rights status: 100% all mineral rights
52727

52728

52147

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

E 47/1861

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

130

130

CORPORATE DIRECTORY
Annual General Meeting

ABN 57 002 594 872

9th November 2011

Directors

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Andrew Forrest – Non-Executive Chairman
Herb Elliott – Non-Executive Deputy Chairman
Nev Power – Executive Director
Graeme Rowley – Non-Executive Director
Ken Ambrecht – Non-Executive Director
Geoff Brayshaw – Non-Executive Director
Owen Hegarty – Non-Executive Director
Li Xiaowei – Non-Executive Director
Mark Barnaba – Non-Executive Director
Geoff Raby – Non-Executive Director
Herbert Scruggs - Non-Executive Director

Company Secretaries
Mark Thomas
Rod Campbell

Principal Registered Office in Australia
Level 2, 87 Adelaide Terrace
East Perth WESTERN AUSTRALIA 6004
Tel: +61 8 6218 8888 Fax: +61 8 6218 8880
Website: www.fmgl.com.au
Email: fmgl@fmgl.com.au

Auditor
BDO Audit (WA) Pty Ltd
38 Station Street
Subiaco WESTERN AUSTRALIA, 6008

Internal Auditor
KPMG
235 St Georges Terrace
Perth WESTERN AUSTRALIA, 6000

Stock Exchange Listings
Fortescue Metals Group Limited shares are listed on the
Australian Securities Exchange (ASX)
ASX Code: FMG

Share Register
Link Market Services Limited
Ground floor, 178 St Georges Terrace
Perth WESTERN AUSTRALIA, 6000
Locked Bag A14
Sydney South NEW SOUTH WALES, 1235
Tel: 1300 733 136 or + 61 2 8280 760
Fax: +61 2 9287 0303
For any change in personal details, please contact
Link Market Services.

Every year we are required to communicate information to securityholders, including annual reports, notices of meetings and other advices.
We believe everyone benefits from electronic securityholder communication – securityholders receive prompt information and have the convenience and security of electronic delivery, there are significant cost savings, and our communications are environmentally friendly. Please use the enclosed form to alter your communication preferences or by logging in via the
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131

FORTESCUE METALS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 2011

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