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Ideal School Essay, Sociology

In: Social Issues

Submitted By toriwatson97
Words 2359
Pages 10
Outline and Assess Features of an Ideal School
(50 marks)
In my opinion, the purpose of education is too teach students specific skills to students that would give them specific skills to help them in the future and continue to benefit them in later life. Education should be beneficial to the individual and that should be seen as most important, then this should automatically lead to it benefiting society completely. If every individual was being separately catered to in education where they are excelling well then this would create a problem free system. I think Marxists view schools as a control mechanism that is only beneficial to the capitalists. Whereas, functionalists view it as a teaching mechanism which ensure a consensus within society. Feminists view education and the education system as patriarchal and only really beneficial for men. My ideal school may not be appropriate for all individuals as not everyone is not guaranteed success in later life by being taught the skills we teach.
I think the purpose of schools and education in general is to prepare a student for the next stage in their life. Education should be there to help you become the best possible person in the future. You should be prepared for important things in the future such as voting, money handling, bill paying, money managed meant and also things like how to live in a recession and how to deal with the stress of living in a recession etc. I think that this would ensure an ideal school as these are the skills that everyone requires in society. They are needed no matter what as it is what the basics are of being an adult and the general life style everyone has. This therefore would lead to a society where everyone will understand fully what is going on and a consensus would be formed. However, it would be far too difficult to make sure everyone underst00d such complex issues fully. Also...

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