Identify the Brain Areas Implicated in Learning That Finally Culminate in Perception, Memory, and Language.

In: Social Issues

Submitted By bishop40
Words 1067
Pages 5
Eric Davis

Soc 120 Introduction to Ethics & Social Responsibility

Joe Niehaus

October 3, 2010

Environmental Ethical Issues
History

According to the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, (2008) environmental ethics began to come to the surface in 1970s. The environmentalists started urging philosophers who were involved with environmental groups to do something about environmental ethics. Most academic activity in the 1970s was spent debating the Lynn White thesis and the tragedy of the commons. These debates were primarily historical, theological, and religious, not philosophical. Throughout most of the decade philosophers sat on the sidelines trying to determine what a field called environmental ethics might look like. The first philosophical conference was organized by William Blackstone at the University of Georgia in 1972. Environmental ethics is the discipline in philosophy that studies the moral relationship of human beings to, and also the value and moral status of the environment and its nonhuman contents. In the literature on environmental ethics the distinction between instrumental value and intrinsic value has been of considerable importance. When environmental ethics emerged as a new sub-discipline of philosophy in the early 1970s, it did so by posing a dispute to traditional anthropocentrism. It questioned the assumed moral superiority of human beings to members of other species on earth. In addition, it investigated the possibility of rational arguments for assigning intrinsic value to the natural environment and its nonhuman contents.

Environmental Ethical Issues
Current events

British Petroleum industry has a long history of oil spills which have destroyed beaches. For example; when an oil slick from a large oil spill reaches the beach, the oil coats and clings to every rock and grain of sand. If the oil washes into…...

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