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Imagery In Truman Capote's In Cold Blood

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Truman Capote’s book, titled In Cold Blood, is about an unfortunate event that takes place in a small town called Holcomb. In his book, Capote describes Holcomb as a wore down, lonely little town in the middle of nowhere. There isn't much to do there and he really makes it sound like a depressing place. Capote does a very good job of including many different stylistic elements in his writing, such as imagery and tone to describe to us the dull town of Holcomb.
Let's look first at the imagery in Capote's writing. When he describes Holcomb, he uses imagery to paint a clear picture about how the town looks and feels. He makes Holcomb sound like a dirty, forgotten town that nobody would ever want to visit by using sensory words that will tell us

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