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Immanual Kant Deontology Presentation

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Immanuel Kant Presentation
Deontology – Deon-duty, logos -science

Because we so regularly take it for granted that moral values are closely related with the goal of human well-being or happiness
Kant's claim that these two ideas are absolutely separate makes it difficult to grasp his point of view and easy to misunderstand it.

"Nothing can possibly be conceived in the world, or even out of it, which can be called good without qualification, except a good will."

What does Kant mean by a "good will"?
A "good will" means to act out of a purpose of moral obligation or "duty". In other words, the moral person does a certain action not because of its consequences, but because she comprehends by reasoning that it is morally the right thing to do and so believes herself as having a moral duty or obligation to do that action. One may of course as an added fact get some enjoyment or other reward from doing the right thing, but to act morally, one does not do it for the sake of its desirable results, but because one recognizes that it is morally the right thing to do.
When does one act from a motive of doing one's duty?
Kant replies that we do our moral duty when our purpose is controlled by a belief recognized by reason rather than the want for any expected result or emotional reasons for our actions.
Kant believes that there are only 2 types of motivations 1. Ones that are clear recognition of one’s duties. 2. Selfish one
This includes those people that are motivated by helping others because it “feels good”. This is selfish because it’s not explicitly about your duties.
Imagine someone who just doesn’t care about other people because of their unsociable character. They aren’t troubled by the plight of a homeless person as they walk by them on the street. They see the person perhaps shivering holding a sign that says “Homeless Vet needs help”…...

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