Premium Essay

Immigration And Naturalization

Submitted By
Words 1687
Pages 7
The United States of America Immigration and Naturalization Act (INA) can be split into five categories: family-based, employment-based, per-country ceilings, refugees and asylees, the diversity visa program, other forms of humanitarian relief, and finally, U.S. citizenship. These five categories consist of limitations, requirements, and exceptions. One of the most controversial category of immigration today is “Refugees and Asylees”. According to the INA, “Refugees are admitted to the United States based upon an inability to return to their home countries because of a ‘well-founded fear of persecution’ due to their race, membership in a particular social group, political opinion, religion, or national origin” (“How the United”). Moreover, …show more content…
In addition, thousands of harmful illegal aliens are roaming the streets of the United States everyday. These illegal immigrants are felons of crime and unlawful activity. According to a U.S. government analysis, the United States population consists of 55,322 illegal immigrants, and the study constructed a statistic that proved the illegal aliens were arrested at least 459,614 times. Furthermore, each illegal alien had a minimum total of 8 arrests (Martin). Based on the research above, it is evident that illegal immigrants do not take responsibility for their actions, and nevertheless, will not stop updating their criminal records. Although, the data above does not discuss an assault conducted against a single citizen, each criminal act listed in the static above exhibits one or more assaults against many U.S. citizens. “A Congressional Research Service report released in August 2012 found that over a 33-month period, between October 2008 and July 2011, more than 159,000 illegal aliens were arrested by local authorities and identified by the federal government as deportable but nevertheless released back onto the streets. Nearly one-sixth of those same individuals were subsequently again arrested for crimes” (Federation for). Moreover, one dangerous of many illegal aliens admitted to returning to the United States after being deported due to criminal activity. These illegal immigrants are aware of the misconducted immigration system and know ways to return to the U.S. and commit more crimes that negatively impact U.S. citizens. Author Peter B. Gemma reports, “‘United States is stupid … I come back every time,’ asserted Mexican national Rolando Mota-Campos to a Virginia-based immigration agent after his 11th arrest — for crimes ranging from abduction, assault, four DUIs, vehicular assault, attempted robbery, and domestic violence.

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Naturalization Of Immigration Essay

...politically. As Hainmueller noted, one in four residents of Switzerland is a foreigner, and a considerable anti-immigration sentiment exists in the country. "Understanding the effect of naturalization on long-term integration of immigrants is an important question in light of these problems," says Hainmueller, co-director of the Immigration and Integration Policy Lab and faculty affiliate of the The Europe...

Words: 752 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Obstacles for the Immigration and Naturalization Service

...Obstacles for the Immigration and Naturalization Service Abstract Prior to the Immigration Act of 1891, there very little need to regulate immigration much less create and maintain an enforcement agency. The boarders to the United States were wide open to every ethnicity who could manage the cost of the trip from home departure country. The following paper will serve as a synopsis on the creation of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, and the growing pains experienced from its beginning to present day. Obstacles for the Immigration and Naturalization Service The duties and responsibilities of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) include: inspecting people coming in at one of the many ports of entry, finding and combatting illegal entry into the U.S., conducting criminal and administrative investigations and receiving, reviewing, approving or denying applications for various reasons (green card, tourist visa, fiancé visas, etc.). As you can see, from the Services beginning, the challenges the INS have faced have been an uphill battle. Upon arrival at one of the many Ports of Entry into the United States; anyone not native born or already currently legally or permeate accepted into the U.S. will undergo a brief interview upon arrival. This scrutiny will determine your fate as to whether the officer on the other side of the counter allows you to enter, (we all know the famous......

Words: 1328 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Argumentative Essay On Immigration And Naturalization

...The United States Immigration Law is known to be very complicated. There are many questionable opinions and arguments towards this policy. To this day the Immigration and Naturalization Act states that there is worldwide limit of 675,000 immigrants, which can change based on close family members. But this is not a recent problem it has been a problem since the 1770’s. In the very beginning Americans were immigrants traveling here to find jobs and escape being judged based on their views.This caused the Naturalization Act in 1790 which only applied to whites and said you had to have good moral character, and live in the United States for two years, almost 100 years later this was extended to african americans. The more people who migrated...

Words: 894 - Pages: 4

Free Essay

Benefits of Becoming a U.S Citizen

...6 Conclusion 7 Abstract This paper examines the requirements, procedures and benefits for becoming a United States citizen. With more and more people coming in the country immigration and citizenship processes have changed to be more selective but easier process. The goal is to provide valuable and free information to all those applying for U.S citizenship. This document draws upon mostly primary sources including, published books, lawyer interviews and material from immigration and government websites. Introduction Are you or someone you know looking to become a United Sates citizen? If so, this document will answer many of your questions saving you money and time during the process of becoming a citizen. “All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside” —from the Fourteenth Amendment. In other words and according to the Merriam-Webster online dictionary, the definition of citizen is “a person who legally belongs to a country and has the rights and protection of that country”. For example, a U.S. citizen can be a person born in United States or a naturalized person with the right to live and work in U.S. Naturalization refers to the process by which a person from another country is given approval to become a U.S. citizen after he or she fulfills the requirements established by Congress...

Words: 2036 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Texas Immigration Issues

...America was founded and built by the hands of immigrants from across the globe. Irish, German, British, Jewish, Catholic, Russian, Polish, Swedish- the list goes on. But where did we draw the line? At what point were immigrants considered “illegal” and obligated to obtain citizenship? Why is immigration at its highest? Most immigrants are in desperate search of the “American Dream” and the freedoms that our country offers. But the toll it is taking on the American people and our pockets is terrifying. To find the balance of helping all who seek citizenship and establishing a stable financial boundary is impossible. Americans are becoming weary of the decrease in jobs and even housing. In 1790, Congress used the power to establish a uniform...

Words: 894 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

The Pros And Cons Of Immigration Reform

...Not only does immigrant reform represent one of the most complex and divisive political issues in America history, it also illustrates one of the greatest paradoxes of American democracy and the foundation of the United States. Even though America was founded on the values of freedom and built by immigrants, the country has a contentious history of antagonizing its existing immigration population and discouraging potential migrants. This historic trend of anti-immigration attitude and legislation stems from the unfamiliarity and uncertainty associated with migrants, which creates vulnerability and represents a threat to the stability of the nation’s national security, both internal and external. Not only is the influx of immigrants viewed as...

Words: 879 - Pages: 4

Free Essay

Dr I Hate This Sign Up

...erhaps one of the most intimidating components of the naturalization process is the citizenship test, which gauges applicants' knowledge and understanding of United States history, government and the legal system. The test often contains information that many native born U.S. citizens don’t even know, believe it or not. Proper preparation is essential to passing this important part of the citizenship application process. While this section will not prepare you for the substance of the test, it does offer resources to help applicants prepare for the citizenship test, including a list of typical citizenship examination questions and an overview of what to expect on the test. Learn About The Citizenship Test What to Expect on the Naturalization Test A guide to the types of tests included in the naturalization process. Learn about the language test, the civics test, what happens if you fail a test, and how to get legal help with the naturalization process. Requirements for Applying for Citizenship in the United States A list of requirements for foreign-born individuals who wish to become U.S. citizens. Learn about the different steps of the citizenship process, including the application, interview, and swearing-in ceremony. Citizenship FAQ A collection of common questions about becoming a naturalized citizen. Find answers to your questions about the naturalization process, how to file a naturalization application, what to do if your application is denied, and......

Words: 399 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Love

...IV Essay Question #5 The Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1965 led to a dramatic change in the United States population. This act abolished an old quota system and established a new immigration policy based on reuniting immigrant families. Not only was that attracting but the fact that this would attract skilled laborers to the United States as well. All this eventually changed the United States and the demographics of the American population. New immigrants came from all the world adding new cultures and division to the known American society. The Civil Rights Movement was the strength that pushed the immigration policy into effect and really pushed the growth of it. The movement was based on equal treatment and why push people away who were not Americans while promoting equality? However, many immigrants began to protest and argue that the quota system was in fact discriminatory. All this speculation allowed John F. Kennedy to even get involved in the immigration movement. He spoke among many calling the system in favorable and intolerable. After Kennedy’s involvement it sparked Congress to begin debating on whether or not to pass the Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1965. Soon after the bill was signed in 1965 and marked a monumental moment for all immigrants. However, this did embark on a pretty huge issue for the United States as a country. “All told, in the three decades following passage of the Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1965, more than 18......

Words: 714 - Pages: 3

Free Essay

Master of Computer Science

...the non-immigrants who migrate legally and assimilate into the system using the channel of permanent residency and citizenships but also by the existing citizens of the nation. The United States is a country of unlimited prospects and possibilities, but there must be rules to ensure order and prosperity. To accomplish this, the federal government, in 1952, established the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). The act, which has been amended many times since then, still serves as the basic framework for U.S. immigration law. In general, it provides a single comprehensive statue which governs immigration and naturalization policy in the United States. There was very little opposition to the Immigration and Naturalization Act at the time of its adoption, but supporters of the act, both Democrats and Republicans favored it for different reasons. Democrats who are considered to be liberal political party, the INA act made all races eligible for naturalization, thus eliminating race as a bar to immigration. They also supported the law because it eliminated discrimination between sexes with respect to immigration, afforded greater procedural safeguards to aliens subject to deportation, broadened the grounds for exclusion and deportation of aliens, and provided equal opportunities for...

Words: 438 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Hydera

...Dissolution of the former U.S. Immigration and Naturalization and Customs Service and the creation of separate agencies under the Department of Homeland Security. The United States Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) was an agency of the U.S. Department of Justice from 1933 to 2003. Referred to by some as former INS and by others as legacy INS, the agency ceased to exist under that name on March 1, 2003, when most of its functions were transferred to three new entities – U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) – within the newly created Department of Homeland Security, as part of a major government reorganization following the September 11 attacks of 2001. The main mission of the INS was to inspect persons arriving at an official Port of Entry (POE), detecting and deterring illegal entry between the ports (by the Border Patrol, a component of the INS) and by sea, and conducting investigations of criminal and administrative violations of the Act. The INS also adjudicated applications for permanent residency ("green cards"), change of status, naturalization, and similar matters. Eleven days after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Ridge was appointed as the first Director of the Office of Homeland Security in the White House. The office oversaw and coordinated a comprehensive national strategy to safeguard the country against......

Words: 1243 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Compromised Solution to Illegal Immigration

...A Compromised Solution to Illegal Immigration The issue of illegal immigration is certainly a very pertinent and current issue of today. Currently there are two resolutions to the issue being proposed by the Democrats and the Republican parts. The Democratic plan works to try and legalize all those who are here illegally, whereas the Republican backed plan seeks to enforce the laws that we all ready have in place. Although both plans have advantages and disadvantages, the Republican backed plan seems to be a superior plan. The illegal immigration problem that is occurring in the United States is a mass crossing of the Southern boarder by Mexican and other central American residents. The number of illegal crossings is estimated to be close to one million a year (State Laws Related to Immigration and Immigrants 1). This number is only an estimate though, and only around 500,000 aliens, or people caught illegally in other countries, are apprehended each year meaning that the number could be even larger(1). These large numbers of illegal aliens entering our country brings with it great risk and danger to us. Every year U.S. citizens living along the boarder are killed by illegals crossing into the U.S. , as well as many Boarder patrol agents who are killed and wounded in the line of duty (U.S. Immigration Policy 1). The illegals crossing also usually bring many illegal substances, such as drugs and guns, which are then sold on the black market in the U.S.. Fears are also......

Words: 1092 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Immigration

...of US immigration legislation (http://immigration-bills.wikispaces.com/History) 1862 and 1875 Immigration Acts * First acts aimed at a specific group * Outlawed the transporting of Chinese "coolies" on American ships 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act * Suspended Chinese worker immigration for ten (10) years * Barred Chinese from naturalization * Chinese exclusion laws made permanent in 1904, until repealed in 1943 1907 Gentleman’s Agreement * Restricted Japanese laborer immigration * Followed in 1924 by the Japanese Exclusion Act 1917 Immigration Act * Created the Asia-Pacific "Barred Zone," further limiting Asian immigration 1920 – 1965: Quotas and External Factors Decrease Numbers 1921 Quota Act * First quantitative immigration law * Restricted any Eastern Hemispheric nationality coming to the U.S. to 3% of their 1910 resident population. The 350,000 "quota immigrants", therefore, came mostly from Northern and Western Europe 1925-1930 * Restrictive legislation cuts immigrant inflows approximately 50% to about 220,000 per year, during the 1925-1930 timeframe * Italian, Russian, Polish numbers fell. Only 15,000 Italians per year were admitted, for example, in 1925-1930 timeframe versus 222,000 in 1921. 1952 The Immigration and Nationality Act allows individuals of all races to be eligible for naturalization. The act also reaffirms national origins quota system, limits immigration......

Words: 463 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Immigration

...The population of the United States has increased dramatically, making the United States Bureau of Immigration cut down on the laws of entering the U.S. illegally. Since congress passed the law of allowing a certain amount of immigrants to enter the U.S., they issue them passports and visas. After their passport and visa expire, they have to leave the country. Although this is a law, most immigrants do not leave the country, living illegally. If it were not for the Border Patrol, the American population would be higher than it already is. The Border Patrol regulates immigrants from illegally crossing the border. They patrol the border searching for possible immigrants crossing the border. If an immigrant is caught by U.S. authority, they will deport them and can charge them with additional fines and some jail time. For example, Mexico has the largest population of immigrants coming to America. Mexicans will actually hide from the Border Patrol in bushes, dirt, rubbish etc until they see the right moment and “run for it”. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) keep the documents of Immigrants who are legal to live in the United States. Immigration and Naturalization Service strictly enforce the law of keeping immigration to a minimum. They only let a small amount of immigrants to come to America each year. The immigrants who can legally come to America are carefully chosen, it sometimes can take years to get approved. Estimated four million immigrants now live......

Words: 359 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Philippines Citizenship

...otherwise he followed the citizenship of the alien father and acquired at best only an inchoate Philippine citizenship which he could perfect by election upon attaining majority age.  EXCEPT if he is born out of lawful wedlock, in which case, he will be considered a Filipino by virtue of his mother’s citizenship.       In addition, only natural-born citizens are allowed to hold constitutional offices such as the office of the President; Senators; Members of the House of Representatives; Members of the Supreme Court; and the Chairman and Commissioners of the Constitutional Commissions (Civil Service Commission, COMELEC and the Commission on Audit). NATURALIZED FILIPINO       Naturalization takes place either voluntarily by complying both the substantive and procedural requirements of the general naturalization law or by operation of law. This process may be direct...

Words: 11780 - Pages: 48

Premium Essay

Elian Gonzales Case Study

...The Immigration and Naturalization Service (“INS”) have reflected a reliable evidence of agency’s Deference efficiency by interpreting the Elian Gonzales Case. INS officials made a reasonable decision based on an accurate and objective review, taking into consideration special circumstances that surrounded this deference (Hall, 2015). A six-year- child who came from Cuba in hard conditions was the cornerstone of this case. The competence of INS was proved by many reasons (Hall, 2015). First, INS was proactive in this case by sending of its officers to have a personal interview with the father of the child(Elian). Even though the father was living in Cuba, but this did not prevent INS to meet with him in order to make a fair and responsible...

Words: 258 - Pages: 2