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Immigration in the Us

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Submitted By GusCharles
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Immigration in the United States
Today people are wondering why the government is allowing immigrants to come to the United States when there are not enough jobs for the citizens currently here. Even though immigration can take jobs away from potential citizens, immigration can bring needed talent to the United States and can better a person’s life. Currently with immigration there is a lot of anti-immigrant sentiment, and lack of major immigration reform. Some immigrants are asylum seekers, while others are looking for a better life. There are benefits to immigration such as population growth and diversity.
People here in America are having trouble finding jobs and are looking towards immigration as the primary reason why. They are wanting the politicians that were elected to choose a side; for immigration or against immigration. This question is part of a huge debate currently raging all across America. People all across America want the United States government to shut down the borders and to deport all of the current illegal immigrants here. As of March 2010, illegal immigrants account for about 11.2 million people currently in the United States (Passel, 2011). Anti-immigration attitudes generally come out when it is harder to find jobs and less when jobs are readily available. Anti-immigrant campaigns blame immigrants for the current job losses and declining wages, as well as higher crime rates and public health crisis (Barry, 2005). A lot of the backlash has to do with the current immigration policies of the United States, which has not been updated since 1990.
The most recent update to the immigration policy was the Immigration Act of 1990 (IMMACT90). IMMACT90 created a new five-tiered employment based system. This system includes three main categories that help bring the most talented people to the United States (Gafner & Yale-Loehr, 2010). The first...

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