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In This Essay I Will Evaluate the Theory of Psychosexual Development and Demonstrate an Evaluate the Extent to Which Freud’s T

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“Evaluate the extent to which Freud’s theory of psychosexual development can help us to understand a client’s presenting issue”

In this essay I am asked to evaluate one aspect of Freudian theory. I will begin by first describing Freud’s psychosexual theory and demonstrate an understanding of its relationship to adult neurotic behavior. Having done this I will examine some of the criticisms that have been levelled at Freudian theory in order to evaluate it.
In 1905 Freud published ‘Three Essays on the theory of Sexuality and other Works’, one of these essays was titled ‘Infantile Sexuality’. In this essay Freud sets out his theory of psychosexual development. He asserts that there is in all humans an innate drive (or instinct>another theory to be debated) for pleasure, a sort of psychic energy, which he calls the libido and this energy needs to be discharged. He then goes on to describe how this drive finds outlet at the earliest stages in life, as babies, toddlers and infants and describes the oral, anal and phallic stages and the psychological effects of fixation at these stages. It is important to note that Freud separated sexual aims and objectives. What Freud meant by sexual in his own writing in German, was ‘life force’ or ‘emotional energy’ (Bettelheim 1983). While this concept has a sexual aspect to it, it is unfortunate that the English translation focuses mainly on this aspect. His work on sexuality and perversions led to the wider theory of sexuality whereby he differentiated the sexual aim (the desire for pleasure) and the object (the person or thing used to fulfil the desire). He asserted that sexuality is more than just a genital copulation between adults and this work is the background to his theory on infantile sexuality. He emphasized particular erogenous zones as being of primary importance at different stages of infancy. Each stage impacts in...

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