In the Modern World, Does "Traditional Marriage" Still Have a Place, or Are We Seeing a Fundamental Change in Our Culture?

In: Social Issues

Submitted By planorganize
Words 957
Pages 4
Because I chose to believe God’s Word, I know that what we may label today as “fundamental change in our culture” will inevitably completely destroy marriage and the family unit, at some point in the future.(1)

Our culture has changed; however, "traditional marriage" still has a place in the modern world, and is therefore not an outdated and archaic institution. If we look closely at those that believe otherwise, we will most likely find their choice to be founded on hurt, resulting from marriage, or a lack thereof.

Indeed, “[the] CDC finds [that] more U.S. couples [are] living together instead of marrying” (Health Day, 2013); further, a cursory comparison between 2000 and 2013 statistics, gives the impression of an alarming trend toward cohabitation.(2) However, for the time being, the same statistics demonstrate that the majority of In the modern world, does "traditional marriage" still have a place, or are we seeing a fundamental change in our culture?either marry or break up; therefore, cohabitation is not (currently) intended (by the majority) to replace marriage.

Although deceptively attractive, easy and convenient, in my opinion, cohabitation, is caused (at the root) by poor parenting, characterized by dysfunctional, unsupported and selfish parents that recycle and multiply unhappiness and an unfulfilled need for companionship, coupled with fear of commitment.(3)

“Marriage is the most basic and fundamental part of our society, and as such it should be protected and honored. The biggest gift we can give our kids [as my parents have given my sister and I] is a solid marriage. Yet, when we conform to the ever-changing patterns of the culture, we teach the next generation to do the same” (Pardue, 2015).

Ultimately cohabitation causes a lot of pain to most, and crumbles the family unit. Contrary to what the Government believes, as demonstrated…...

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