Inclusion Paper

In: Social Issues

Submitted By JAJAchris
Words 1097
Pages 5
Inclusion is a viewpoint that brings different students, whether able or disabled to create schools and other social institutions based on acceptance, belonging and community. In any classroom there are different kinds of children, but you may not be able to notice the differences among them from just looking at them. In almost every classroom they should be at least one child that needs special services that is not given in the classroom. There is no one law that forces classrooms to be inclusive, but when the Americans with Disabilities Act was passed in 1990 it made it illegal for any facility to deny any person or persons admittance into a facility because they had a disability. Advocacy for Inclusion believes that children who have a disability should have an inclusive Education of their choosing in the same way that choices are available to students in the broader community. The below are the discussion to maintain successful inclusion education.
In the Camp children with special needs are first educated in a separate special education classroom called respite care, then they are transferred into a regular education classroom, but only after they had met certain criteria that would place them in a typically developing classroom with typically developing children. But simply placing a child into respite care class is not enough to develop child and be able to learn with others but Careful planning of the child’s entrance into the normal classroom must be carried out to ensure a successful experience. Interactions between the disabled children and the children who are not disabled are a better way to promote good social relationships. When a child is coming from respite care class, other children don’t feel comfortable to learn with that particular child simply because that child is older than them in the class. Disabled child also can feel ashamed to be in…...

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