Free Essay

Indian Water Problem

In: Science

Submitted By Damonshuai
Words 659
Pages 3
http://www.nbr.org/research/activity.aspx?id=356 http://www.arlingtoninstitute.org/wbp/global-water-crisis/606 http://www.theindianblogger.com/problems/water-problem-of-india/ http://www.azadindia.org/social-issues/water-problem-in-india.html 1.0 Introduction
Water is important, however, water problem in India is so serious, and therefore, I decide to help Indians to solve this problem. In some parts of India, especially in the southeast of India, Indians lack access to clean drinking water, and the situation is only getting worse. In addition to this, unclear management will cause a slew of subsequent problems, such as food shortage, intrastate, and International conflicts.(IMMINENT WATER CRISIS IN INDIA, August 2007) According to the research, over 50% of villages still have no source of protected drinking water and maybe by 2020, India will become a water-stressed nation. The main reason why water problem in India is so serious is population and lack of water supply. (Water problem in India, 2001) In my opinion, building a policy for decentralizing the task of pollution control is a useful way to solve it, because the government can spend least money to control the pollution. Besides, building a water harvest center is an important way to solve lack of water supply. (Indian Bharat, 2010) If the government adapts as I mentioned before, this water problem will solved easily. 2.0 Methodology
During my research, I used Bing search engine, which helps me find all sources online. First, I typed the main point: water problem in India, and typed the questions I made in my cover sheet. Then, I chose some popular websites, which have clear date and author name. If I cannot make sure that whether the information is true or not, I will ask my Indian teacher to prove. When I am searching for information, I have to choose persuasive websites, because it decides whether the article is useful or not. If I can get enough answers for the questions I made on my sheet, it is easy for me to finish my essay. 3.0 Findings
When it comes to the key issue about fresh water, I have to mentions that water pollution and lack of water supply. Although India has deserts, there are also three main lakes, like Ganges, Yamuna and Krishna. However, fresh water in lakes is mostly polluted. For example, New Delhi alone produces 3.6 million cubic meters of sewage everyday, but, due to the poor management, less than half is effectively treated. The remaining untreated waste is dumped in to the Yamuna River, which is one of the largest lakes in India. Finally, when the sewage reaches downstream cities, the government has to heavily treat it, which subsequently drives up cost. (Imminent water crisis in India, August 2007) When it comes to the results of pollution, what we could not deny is water quality. The health burden of poor water quality is enormous. It is estimated that around 37.7 million Indians are affected by waterborne diseases annually, 1.5 million children are estimated to die of diarrhea alone and 73 million working days are lost dye to waterborne disease each year. There are 195613 habitations in the country are affected by poor water quality. (Indira Khurana and Romit Sen) From the statistics above, we know that pollution in India is so serious and it can acquire terrible effects, too. Personally, government should pay more attention to factories, due to the fact that they are the main criminals to pollute water. Another policy is that water can be privatized with a higher price in India, which is supported by World Bank. Because a privatized water supply would prevent waste, improve efficiently, and encourage innovation. The second problem is the lack of water supply, especially in poor areas. Although Indian government has paid large sums of money to build water supply, it has only solved the problems in urban areas.

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