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Indians and Americans

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Indians and Americans

The customs of Indians are different than that of Americans. Even with Indians that have moved here and built their lives in America. From religion to fashion there is a big difference in Native Indians and Americans. They have adapted to a lot of America ways and enjoy their lives here yet some miss their Indian customs.
India is acknowledged as the origin of Hinduism and Buddhism which are the third and fourth largest religions in the world. According to the “Handbook of Research on Development and Religion” Edited by Matthew Clarke (Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013). There are differences of Hinduism and four predominant sects, Smarta, Shakteya, Vaishnava, and Shaiva. With around 13 percent of Indians being Muslims it makes India one of the largest Islamic nations in the world. Sikhs and Christians make up a small percentage of the India population, with even a smaller percentage of Jains and Buddhists (Indian Culture, 2016). In contrast, just about every religion known is practiced in the United States of America. Around 83 percent of Americans are identified as Christians according to the ABC poll, unlike the small percentage of Christians in India. Judaism is the second most religions identification and only .6 percent responding to being Muslim. India is almost opposite in comparison with religion in America (American Culture, 2016).
Traditional clothing for men in India is the dhoti. It is an unstitched piece of cloth they tie around their waist and legs. Men also wear a kurta, which is a shirt that is loose and worn about knee-length. And for special occasions the men will wear a sherwani. This is a long coat which is buttoned to the collar and to the knees. The women wear colorful silk saris (Indian Culture, 2016). In contrast American’s clothing varies by region, social status, climate and occupation. Some

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