Premium Essay

Industrialization and International Development

In: Social Issues

Submitted By PsBee
Words 2416
Pages 10
The terms ‘imperialism’, defines the dynamics of a long-term process of social change and transformation, together with associated class struggles and also to establish hegemony over the world system.1 The old imperialism rise in the late 19th century as direct consequences of industrial capitalism and engaged Europe, the US and Japan in a competitive struggle for markets and territorial control. 2 Actually, structures of exploitation mean exploit a country by using certain level of strategies. In old imperialism, firstly they enter a country by colonized them, secondly they produced and exported manufactured goods in exchange for raw materials, minerals and other industrial inputs or consumer commodities their colonies. Imperialist dominated all the resources in colonial countries where this is way allowing them to accumulate capital3 via ‘unequal exchange 4and unequal development. According to James Petras, there are no differences in new imperialism and old imperialism. But there are some differences, which are in new imperialism, there more focus on development as a form of imperialism. There is still existing of structure exploitation in new imperialism where developing countries are dominated by multinational corporations. In addition, most developing countries where introduced and practice the neo-liberalism system which is also a part of structure exploitation. Neo-liberalism benefited and makes richer the capitalist as much as possible while the developing countries remain underdeveloped. Industrialization is a process of transition from agriculture sector to industry sector where there are consists of two parties, capitalist and workers. The events that led to the adoption of industrialization as a strategy to promote economic growth for post-colonial in

1 &2

James Petras and Henry Veltmeyer, “Multinationals on trial: foreign investment matters”,...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

1. Industrialization and International Development

...secondly they produced and exported manufactured goods in exchange for raw materials, minerals and other industrial inputs or consumer commodities their colonies. Imperialist dominated all the resources in colonial countries where this is way allowing them to accumulate capital[3] via ‘unequal exchange [4]and unequal development. According to James Petras, there are no differences in new imperialism and old imperialism. But there are some differences, which are in new imperialism, there more focus on development as a form of imperialism. There is still existing of structure exploitation in new imperialism where developing countries are dominated by multinational corporations. In addition, most developing countries where introduced and practice the neo-liberalism system which is also a part of structure exploitation. Neo-liberalism benefited and makes richer the capitalist as much as possible while the developing countries remain underdeveloped. Industrialization is a process of transition from agriculture sector to industry sector where there are consists of two parties, capitalist and workers. The events that led to the adoption of industrialization as a strategy to promote economic growth for post-colonial in East Asia in late 1960’s and Latin America after the Second World War is...

Words: 2409 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Late Development

...Gerschenkron and the political economy of late capitalist development Ben Selwyn Available online: 25 Jul 2011 To cite this article: Ben Selwyn (2011): Trotsky, Gerschenkron and the political economy of late capitalist development, Economy and Society, 40:3, 421-450 To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03085147.2011.574425 PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE Full terms and conditions of use: http://www.tandfonline.com/page/termsand-conditions This article may be used for research, teaching and private study purposes. Any substantial or systematic reproduction, re-distribution, re-selling, loan, sub-licensing, systematic supply or distribution in any form to anyone is expressly forbidden. The publisher does not give any warranty express or implied or make any representation that the contents will be complete or accurate or up to date. The accuracy of any instructions, formulae and drug doses should be independently verified with primary sources. The publisher shall not be liable for any loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever caused arising directly or indirectly in connection with or arising out of the use of this material. Economy and Society Volume 40 Number 3 August 2011: 421Á 450 Downloaded by [University of Sussex Library] at 03:33 31 August 2011 Trotsky, Gerschenkron and the political economy of late capitalist development Ben Selwyn Abstract...

Words: 14030 - Pages: 57

Premium Essay

Project Management

...Introduction (1) Chapter 1 Technological Innovation  Technological innovation is the major force for change in modern society  A force of knowledge. Creating knowledge  The domain of science Applying knowledge. The domain of technology.  There are two basic issues about knowledge:   Source: Betz (2011)  Prepared by Chi-Yo Huang, Ph.D. 1 Prepared by Chi-Yo Huang, Ph.D. 3 Contents Introduction (2)        Introduction Timeline of Science, Technology, and Industrialization Innovation Process Technology and Wealth Technical Savvy and Financial Savvy Technical Personnel and Business Personnel 2 There is a difference between technology and scientific technology Technologies are the "how" to do something  E.g. 天工開物  Science is the "why" of something.  So scientific technologies are both the how and why something can be done in nature.  Science understands nature.  Scientific technology manipulates nature. (Scientific technology: the technology invented upon a science base of knowledge that explains why the technology work)  Prepared by Chi-Yo Huang, Ph.D. Prepared by Chi-Yo Huang, Ph.D. 4 Introduction (3) Introduction (5)  The basis for our modern age, characterized by   So many new technologies and Rapid technological progress,  The study of these (science to technology to economy) connections is  is the science base of modern technologies (or scientific......

Words: 1634 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Fallacy of Taking Development to the People

...DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS AND POLICY DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL AND NATURAL RESOURCES UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT BERKELEY Working Paper No. 887 FALLACIES IN DEVELOPMENT THEORY AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR POLICY by Irma Adelman Copyright © 1999 by Irma Adelman. All rights reserved. Readers may make verbatim copies of this document for non-commercial purposes by any means, provided that this copyright notice appears on all such copies. California Agricultural Experiment Station Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics May, 1999 FALLACIES IN DEVELOPMENT THEORY AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR POLICY. by Irma Adelman I. Introduction No area of economics has experienced as many abrupt changes in leading paradigm during the post Word War II era as has economic development. Since economic development is a policy science, the twists and turns in development economics have had profound implications for development policy. Specifically, the dominant development model has determined policy prescriptions concerning the desirable: role of government in the economy; its degree of interventionism; the form interventionism; and the nature of government-market interactions. Changes in both theory and policy prescriptions arise mainly from the following five sources: First, there is learning. As our empirical and theoretical knowledge-base enlarges, new theoretical propositions, or new evidence concerning either resounding real-world......

Words: 13335 - Pages: 54

Free Essay

Import Substitution an Industrialization

...Import Substitution and Industrialization in Latin Amercia: Experiences and Interpretations Author(s): Werner Baer Source: Latin American Research Review, Vol. 7, No. 1 (Spring, 1972), pp. 95-122 Published by: The Latin American Studies Association Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2502457 Accessed: 26/08/2009 09:21 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unless you have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and you may use content in the JSTOR archive only for your personal, non-commercial use. Please contact the publisher regarding any further use of this work. Publisher contact information may be obtained at http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=lamer. Each copy of any part of a JSTOR transmission must contain the same copyright notice that appears on the screen or printed page of such transmission. JSTOR is a not-for-profit organization founded in 1995 to build trusted digital archives for scholarship. We work with the scholarly community to preserve their work and the materials they rely upon, and to build a common research platform that promotes the discovery and use of these resources. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. The Latin American Studies......

Words: 12006 - Pages: 49

Free Essay

Working Student

...A Research Paper On Why Capitalism Succeeded In Generating An Industrial Revolution In Other Countries But Failed In The Philippines Submitted by Manuel Ortega Abis Student No. 11-71-003, BPA Special Program Batch 8-A CAPA, Universidad de Manila Professor Ronaldo J. Navata PREFACE The research materials and references used in this research paper were managed to be gathered through unlimited internet hours and limited library hours, but the pages on the web and the pages of the book offered equal enlightenment and enjoyment. The premises and conclusions built and reached in this paper are products of the researcher’s serious analysis of the Philippine economic situation. The researcher, however, is praying that his objectivity and the sincerity of his language shall not fail him in his own humble attempt to bring this mini-thesis to its just and proper course and closure. The twin causes formulated in this paper are generally subdivided into two: the concept of economic will (policy system of governance) and the concept of economic ownership (property system of the governed). Further reading is advised on critical and related topics of this paper. For the economy, these words: there is no such thing as the co-existence of freedom and equality. God bless the......

Words: 16024 - Pages: 65

Premium Essay

S Development the Real Output Expected of Cross-Border Financial Flows from Intermediaries?

...: Development Histories, Theories and Practices TITLE OF PAPER: Is Development the Real Output Expected of Cross-Border Financial Flows from Intermediaries? The role played by financing in the process of development cannot be addressed as either enhancing or undermining, because it could function as both depending on the global dynamics and internal structural differences within countries in a specific period of time. As seen through history, financing has showed that the combination of political and historical factors influence the resulting situation whether it is development or not reflected on its economic growth, by designing a unique path that later will have implications on social issues not being address at first. Depending on the initial situation and a clear idea of the expected results from an entering cash flow to the economy could influence to be a beneficial transference. The purpose of this essay is to discuss the dilemma on whether cross-border cash flows into a financial system increases or decreases economic growth translated somehow in industrialization, mostly from under a economic point of view that takes into consideration the macroeconomic policies, taking this factors as components of development; knowing that there are other social, cultural and political issues that are part of this process that while are not being approached entirely in this essay as poverty and inequality, are indirectly implied as part of the process. First I briefly......

Words: 1445 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Industrial Revolution

...America starts with the occurrence of industrialization, which, basically, meant switching from home production to plants and factories. The industrial revolution took place at the beginning of the XIXth century in most of the developed countries all over the world. Still it is considered more American phenomenon. This revolution changed the States so critically that I consider it to be the main factor that lead to the modern place of this country in the international environment. In my essay I will discuss some positive and negative aspects of the influence of industrialization on the United States. In my opinion the most constructive and crucial effect of the industrial revolution in America is change in people’s behavior. I believe labor is the only factor that is significant for development of any country. And the industrialization time in the States forced people to invent and implement everything they could imagine and construct in order to simplify the production process. There were very few scientists and specialists at that time in this country. So, every American had no other way to survive and earn money at that time and had to create, construct machines, build factories or work on factories. This changed the people’s psychology a lot. Till now, Americans consider new inventions, new machines and processes to be the only way for development of their lives. Another strong positive outcome of the industrial revolution is the development of infrastructure. Most of......

Words: 564 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Civil War

...United States became a much more industrialized society. Between 1865 and 1920, industrialization improved American life in many ways. However, industrialization also created problems for the American society. Industrialization lead to the development of the middle-class. Immigrants from all over the world arrived in the United States in large numbers. Several Americans migrated from rural areas to the urban areas. The advancement in transportation brought international markets for the US society (Meyer, 2003). The industrial revolution saw vital turning points in the history of the United States such as equal rights for women, advancements in technology, rights for African Americans and many others. On the other hand, industrialization also resulted in several problems such as child labor, unsafe working conditions, low wages and no proper government regulations. The country inclined towards industries and had less focus on the agricultural lands. The systemic organization of labor and the division of work increased the production of goods, thus increasing the economy of the country. An increase in the economy due to the industrial activities increased the standard of living of the people. People started migrating from the South to the North in search of employment as there were enormous factories in the North (Rees). The geography of America also played a significant role during industrialization, due to the abundant supply of water and forests available in the......

Words: 649 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Industrialization In Pakistan Case Study

...Trends and phases Industrialization In this section we will discuss different industrialization trend effects on GDP. ⦁ 1947-50 ⦁ At the time of participation out of 955 industries Pakistan got only 34 industries the rest were located in India. Pakistan got only small scale industries .In 1947 suggested that for growth and development of country there were need to establish new industries for that purpose Govt. establish industrial finance corporation& industrial credit corporation in1948 at that time investor invest in these industries which show the highest profit. The contribution in GDP 6.9% ⦁ 1950s ⦁ In1960s there were shifted consumer goods industries to heavy machines such as steel, petro chemical steel. The industrial performance in...

Words: 1478 - Pages: 6

Free Essay

Advantages and Disadvantages of Modern Technologies

...Economic History of Hong Kong Hong Kong’s economic and political history has been primarily determined by its geographical location.  The territory of Hong Kong is comprised of two main islands (Hong Kong Island and Lantau Island) and a mainland hinterland. It thus forms a natural geographic port for Guangdong province in Southeast China. In a sense, there is considerable continuity in Hong Kong’s position in the international economy since its origins were as a commercial entrepot for China’s regional and global trade, and this is still a role it plays today.  From a relatively unpopulated territory at the beginning of the nineteenth century, Hong Kong grew to become one of the most important international financial centers in the world.  Hong Kong also underwent a rapid and successful process of industrialization from the 1950s that captured the imagination of economists and historians in the 1980s and 1990s.  Hong Kong from 1842 to 1949 After being ceded by China to the British under the Treaty of Nanking in 1842, the colony of Hong Kong quickly became a regional center for financial and commercial services based particularly around the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank and merchant companies such as Jardine Matheson.  In 1841 there were only 7500 Chinese inhabitants of Hong Kong and a handful of foreigners, but by 1859 the Chinese community was over 85,000 supplemented by about 1600 foreigners. The economy was closely linked to commercial activity, dominated by shipping,......

Words: 2125 - Pages: 9

Free Essay

Micro

...conditions for the development of oil and gas industry in Viet Nam. * The political and social environment The stability of politics is one of the elements which not only contributes to help Viet Nam persevere in the developing economy policy but also make our country step in the period of peace and prosperity. Being in the stable politics, oil and gas field has many favourable conditions in order to develop turnovers as well as innovate new technology or export oil and gas to international market. * The economic environment The task of renovating economy and politics has been deployed since 1986, which helped Viet Nam change from one of the poorest country in the world with GDP under 100 dollars to 2200 dollars at the end of 2015. The rate of the poor has declined sharply from 58% in 1993 to 5% in 2015. Moreover, the index of social security is improved significantly. The strategy of economic and social development over the period of 10 years, between 2011 and 2020 will focus on reforming structure, improving not only the environment, the human resources (especially human resources serving for the modern industry field), the democracy to stabilize macroeconomic but also the institution of economic market, investing the infrastructure so that Viet Nam can become a modern industrial country. The development of economy in Viet Nam is the good condition to oil and gas field in order that it can accomplish the goal of national industrialization and modernization......

Words: 1266 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

International Banking: Historical Synthesis of the Basic Problems and Developments of the Monetary and Credit Systems During the 19th and 20th Centuries

...Virac, Catanduanes INTERNATIONAL BANKING: HISTORICAL SYNTHESIS OF THE BASIC PROBLEMS AND DEVELOPMENTS OF THE MONETARY AND CREDIT SYSTEMS DURING THE 19th AND 20th CENTURIES A requirement in English 2 ( Writing in Discipline ) Second Semester SY : 2012 – 2013 TF 7:00 – 8:30 am PRINCE JOHN A. ARCILLA AB – Economics 1 DR. YOLANDA T. TARIMAN PROFESSOR - ENGLISH II FEBRUARY 8, 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS CONTENTS PAGE PRELIMINARY PAGE Title Page Table of Contents Outline CHAPTERS 1 Introduction Overview of the Topic 2 Discussion 3 Conclusion BIBLIOGPAPHY CURRICULUM VITAE ii INTERNATIONAL BANKING: HISTORICAL SYNTHESIS OF THE BASIC PROBLEMS AND DEVELOPMENTS OF THE MONETARY AND CREDIT SYSTEMS DURING THE 19th AND 20th CENTURIES Thesis Statement: Our historical synthesis focuses on the economic and political aspects of banking, with questions of industrial management and the credit economy taking second place. OUTLINE I CURRENCY AND MONETARY HISTORY IN THE 19th CENTURY 1 From Silver and Bimetal Currency to Gold Standard 2 The Development of the Bank Note into a Legal Tender A Bank Notes and Issuing Banks in England until Mid-19th Century B Peel’s Bank Charter Act C The Banque de France in the 19th Century D Overcoming the Federal System of German Issuing Banks E The United States’ Arduous Journey Towards the Federal System II BANKS AND BANKING FROM THE EARLY PHASE OF INDUSTRIALIZATION TO THE MIDDLE......

Words: 1509 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Nike Marketing

...Authors Name Institutional Affiliation Chapter 4 The chapter looks at the main factors that led to the concern off international health. It explores the main backgrounds of modern international health from the time of the Eurasian plague for three hundred years. It examines events like the rise of the slave trade and imperialism and the health consequences that came with these events. It then turns and examines the Industrial Revolution in the 19th century and the upsurge of the sanitary reform movement. These events led to the presence and development of new international health institutions. Plague outbreaks led to the beginnings of the earliest health regulations. The increase of rival leaders fighting for power and increase of travel and trade led to the outbreaks of widespread diseases. The Middle Ages were characterized by two great plague outbreaks. The Plague of Justinian affected populations moving from Asia to Ireland. The second great plague was the great Black Death in the 14th century. The plague is said to be the most critical epidemic in mankind’s history. The plague shook the whole political, economic, social and ecclesiastical structure of Europe and it led to a death of 25 million people throughout India, China and Mediterranean. The plague was suspected to have been caused by the numerous human contacts. This led to the earliest efforts of international disease control. In the faith that the plague was introduced by the movement of trade ships, Venice......

Words: 1568 - Pages: 7

Free Essay

Rise of Export Processing Zones

...The post-WWII era was a period that brought about significant global social and economic change. With the conversion from domestic to export production due to increasing domestic production costs, First World nations sought after Third World labour as a way to reduce production costs. The rise of Third World industrialization, or newly industrialized countries (NICs), in the 1970s and growing throughout the rest of the century allowed the First World to keep up with rising consumption rates while keeping labour costs low. To represent the shift to export production, and to serve firms seeking lower wages and Third World governments seeking capital investment, export processing zones (EPZs) were created. Most EPZs are located in developing countries, and these zones attract employers as a solution to domestic production while also taking advantage of reduced trade barriers set up by the host nation in an attempt to reduce poverty, unemployment, and stimulate their domestic economy. The creation of these EPZs supported the rise of neoliberal globalization and the free market system throughout the latter half of the 20th century, which stated that the private sector would determine state priorities. This paper will examine the rise of EPZs and their connection to neoliberal globalization, as well as their relationship to the debt crisis of the 1980s and the growth of structural adjustment programs. With the Cold War immediately following WWII, countries were divided into a......

Words: 2265 - Pages: 10