Instructional Strategies for Ell Students

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Running Head: INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES FOR ELL CLASSROOMS

Instructional Strategies for ELL Classrooms
Jacqueline Freeland
Professor:
Grand Canyon University
ESL 423 N
8/8/10

Abstract
There is an art of teaching English Language Learning (ELL) students which requires teachers to be comfortable and using diversified instructions. There was a time when schools used the method of one size fits all, but in today’s learning world this method will not be fair to all students. Therefore every teacher has to incorporate a different learning instruction and concepts to fit his/her classroom. From communications to understanding skills of different students it has placed educators in a position where they must exhibit different types of teaching methods. Even though, these methods should keep students on target in their learning environment so that they can hit the benchmark. America is considered the melting pot and when we look around we can see that there are many rich cultures. Although this has always been the case in America it just seems that it is more evident now than it was in the past.

Instructional Strategies for ELL Classrooms
English Language Learners need certain instructions while in class. Within the United States there are multiple strategies that are used during instructional teaching. Within this paper we will review a range of components for instructional strategies for ELL classrooms. We will take a look at comprehensible input. The next stages we will discuss are; grouping structures, techniques, and feedback. Thirdly, we will look at schema, vocabulary development and background. Lastly, we will look at demonstration of student engagement and how it attributes to the success of ELL students.

Comprehensible Input:

We know that communication is a way that students understand and it is an effective tool and…...

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