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International Criminal Law

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Resolution 827 (United Nations Security Council 25 de May de 1993)
Azuero, J. C. (2008). DIFERENCIAS ENTRE EL DERECHO PENAL INTERNACIONAL Y EL DERECHO INTERNACIONAL PENAL. Prolegómenos: Derechos y valores, dec, 181-211
Clariana, G. G. (1976). Sobre la Noción de Cooperación en el Derecho Internacional. Revista Española de Derecho Internacional N° 1
Comité Internacional de la Cruz Roja - Genova. (s.f.). El régimen de consentimiento del Estado contra la jurisdicción universal. Recuperado el 1 de Febrero de 2012, de CICR: http://www.icrc.org/spa/resources/documents/misc/5tdm9b.htm
Corzo Aceves, V. E., & Corzo Aceves, E. E. (2006). EL SISTEMA PENAL INTERNACIONAL. Revista Mexicana de Justicia, Los nuevos desafíos de la Procuraduría General de la República, Sexta Época, No. 13, 15-35
Domínguez, A. C. (2006). Derecho Penal Internacional. Valencia: Tirant lo Blanch. Kant, I. (1785). Groundwork of the Metaphysic of Morals. Germany.
Lemkin, R. (April 1946). Genocide. American Scholar
Oficina en Colombia del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Derechos Humanos. (2003). Compilación de Derecho Internacional Penal: El Estatuto de Roma y otros instrumentos de la Corte Penal Internacional. Bogotá: Alejandro Valencia Villa
Plana, M. A. (s.f.). DERECHO PENAL INTERNACIONAL. Recuperado el 1 de Febrero de 2012, de LegalInfo-Panama.com: http://www.legalinfo- panama.com/articulos/dpi-1.pdf
Ruiz, L. C. (2006). La Corte Penal Internacional.
Salmón, E., & García, G. (s.f.). Los tribunales internacionales que juzgan individuos: el caso de los tribunales ad-hoc para la ex-Yugoslavia y Rwanda y el Tribunal Penal Internacional como manifestaciones institucionales de la subjetividad internacional del ser humanos. En Serie de Libros Azules Vol. VII "Las Naciones Unidas y los Derechos Humanos, 1945-1995"
Szczaranski, C. (2004). Culpabilidades y sanciones en crímenes contra los derechos humanos. Otra clase de delitos. Santiago de Chile: Fondo de Cultura Económica.
Vallejo, M. J. (2008). Crisis del Principio de Legalidad en el Derecho Penal Internacional. Bogotá: Ibáñez.

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