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Introduction to Criminology

In: Social Issues

Submitted By aymanelzeiny
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Chapter 1
Introduction To Criminology
A-why criminology?
There is very important and critical questions , impose it self at our minds. why do people get paid to study crime and criminal behavior , and why do people engage in this area of study ?
There are a variety of answers of these questions, built around many kinds of concerns , like the anxiety, anger , and fear that are common responses to crime of the future crimes . former victims of crimes may contribute of showing the importance of studying criminology by, transferring them experience and feeling of anxiety, anger, and fear which Generated from crimes to other persons .
Then the need to study criminology become at the forefront of priorities , to predict and control crime; the hope of preventing crime through individual and social reform the wish to understand and explain crime and societal reactions to it; and the simple desire to learn more about crime and what it can tell us about our society .
Criminologists disagree, sometimes violently, about which of these kinds of concerns are most legitimate and important .
So Criminology was the composite result of the thinking and endeavors of many people, and them desire to the understanding the individual behavior and deviation and the structuring of the social order .
The study of crime has engaged the interest of many academic disciplines. Building on centuries of philosophical debate, systematic attempts to explain crime emerged from the developing biological and social sciences in the late nineteenth century.
Anthropologists, statisticians, and economists have contributed to the analysis of crime, but the major theories have come from sociology, psychology, and psychiatry.
Yet, despite the overlapping concerns of these disciplines, their theories have developed against a background of mutual disinterest, if not antipathy. This partly...

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