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Iodine

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IODINE ASSIGNMENT

Iodine is a chemical element with symbol I and atomic number 53.
Iodine is a trace mineral and an essential nutrient found naturally in the body (Medline Plus, 2011)
The body does not produce iodine, so it is an essential part to have in diet. The body uses Iodine to produce thyroid hormones that are necessary for regulating growth, development, metabolism and temperature. Iodine is mostly found in the thyroid gland, some found in blood and muscles (About.com Health’s Disease and Condition, 2012).
Iodine is found in various foods. Common foods high in iodine include iodised salt, dairy products, seafood and some breads.
Iodine deficiency (a lack of iodine in the body) can lead to enlargement of the thyroid (goiter) which results in hypothyroidism (when thyroid hormone production is below normal levels). However, excessive iodine can also trigger auto-immune thyroid disease and hypothyroidism (The NZ Nutrition Foundation, 2009).
The NZ Nutrition Foundation have identified that NZ soils are very low in iodine which results in low iodine levels in locally grown foods so therefore, the public need to be continually educated about the benefits of using iodised salt in their cooking

References: 1. Summaries for Patients. (2012). American Thyroid Association. Retrieved from http://www.thyroid.org/patient-thyroid-information 2. The NZ Nutrition Foundation. (2009). Iodine. Retrieved from http://www.nutrition foundation.org.nz/nutrition-facts/minerals/iodine 3. Medline Plus. (2012). Iodine in diet. Retrieved from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002421.htm 4. Wikipedia-iodine. Retrieved from http://www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/iodine 5. Ministry of health –iodine. Retrieved from http://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/preventative-health-wellness/nutrition/iodine 6. About.com. (2012). Iodine. Retrieved from
http://nutrition.about.com/od/mineralglossary/g/iodine.htm

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