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Iranian Government

In: Social Issues

Submitted By hawk0714
Words 548
Pages 3
I believe that Iran does not have a totalitarian government. The reason for this believe is from a couple reasons. One, the government does not demand complete loyalty to themselves, but demands for complete loyalty to Allah, the Islamic God. It also does not destroy other social groups. As in article 3. 26 of the Iranian constitution “The formation of parties, societies, political or professional associations, as well as religious societies, whether Islamic or pertaining to one of the recognized religious minorities, is permitted provided they do not violate the principles of independence, freedom, national unity, the criteria of Islam, or the basis of the Islamic republic. No one may be prevented from participating in the aforementioned groups, or be compelled to participate in them.” As well as article 3.23“The investigation of individuals' beliefs is forbidden, and no one may be molested or taken to task simply for holding a certain belief.” Although a small appointed group controls most of the government, there is still the election process for other pieces of the government. They work together to go in the direction they wish to go. As in article 7.100 “In order to expedite social, economic, development, public health, cultural, and educational programmes and facilitate other affairs relating to public welfare with the cooperation of the people according to local needs, the administration of each village, division, city, municipality, and province will be supervised by a council to be named the Village, Division, City, Municipality, or Provincial Council. Members of each of these councils will be elected by the people of the locality in question. Qualifications for the eligibility of electors and candidates for these councils, as well as their functions and powers, the mode of election, the jurisdiction of these councils, the hierarchy of their...

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